Axis order of battle for the invasion of Yugoslavia

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graphic map overlay showing the German thrusts into Yugoslavia
The German-led Axis invasion of Yugoslavia as shown in the United States Government Why We Fight documentary series

The Axis order of battle for the invasion of Yugoslavia includes a listing (or order of battle) of all operational formations of the German Wehrmacht and Waffen-SS, Italian Armed Forces and Hungarian Armed Forces that were involved in the World War II invasion of Yugoslavia which commenced on 6 April 1941. It involved the German 2nd Army, with elements of the 12th Army, a panzer group and an independent motorised corps combined with overwhelming German Air Force (German: Luftwaffe) support. The nineteen German divisions included five panzer divisions, two motorised infantry divisions and two mountain divisions. The German force also included three well-equipped independent motorised regiments and was supported by over 750 aircraft. The Italian 2nd Army and 9th Army committed a total of twenty-two divisions, and the Royal Italian Air Force (Italian: Regia Aeronautica) had 666 aircraft available to support the invasion. The Hungarian 3rd Army also participated, with support available from over 500 aircraft of the Royal Hungarian Air Force (Hungarian: Magyar Királyi Honvéd Légierő, MKHL).

The Axis ground forces had effectively surrounded the Kingdom of Yugoslavia before the invasion began. The German 2nd Army, consisting of one motorised, one mountain, and two infantry corps was concentrated in southwestern Hungary and southeastern Austria, poised to drive south and east. One motorised corps of the German 12th Army was assembled near Sofia, Bulgaria, along with one motorised corps of the First Panzer Group, and these formations were assigned the task of striking the strongest Yugoslav formations stationed along the eastern border of the country. A further motorised corps was deployed near Timisoara in western Romania, ready to thrust south into the Banat region. The Italian 2nd Army, consisting of one fast (Italian: celere) corps, one motorised corps and three infantry corps was assembled in northeastern Italy, with the task of driving southeast down the Dalmatian coast. The Italian 9th Army, comprising two corps and a sector defence command was stationed in occupied northern Albania, and its stance was largely defensive. The Hungarian 3rd Army was concentrated along the Yugoslav border largely between the Danube and the Tisza, with the objective of seizing the Bačka and Baranja regions.

German, Italian and Hungarian air support was concentrated in Austria, Italy, southern Hungary, southern Romania, western Bulgaria and Albania. In total, over 1,900 Axis aircraft were available to support the invasion. Naval forces used to support the invasion were limited to a few destroyers of the Royal Italian Navy (Italian: Regia Marina) operating in the Adriatic Sea.

German[edit]

German land forces[edit]

The German formations committed to the invasion of Yugoslavia included over 337,000 men, and more than 2,000 mortars, 1,500 artillery pieces, 1,100 anti-tank guns, 875 tanks and 740 other armoured fighting vehicles.[1]

2nd Army[edit]

The German 2nd Army was commanded by Generaloberst (General) Maximilian von Weichs, and consisted of one motorised, one mountain, and two infantry corps, and was assembled in southwestern Hungary and southeastern Austria.[2][3] The LII Infantry Corps suffered significant delays in deploying to its assembly area and was initially held in reserve.[4] Direct command combat support units of 2nd Army included two bridging battalions.[5]

Composition of German 2nd Army[6]
Corps Commander Assembly area Division
Nagykanizsa, Hungary
8th Panzer Division
14th Panzer Division
16th Motorised Infantry Division
Klagenfurt, Austria
1st Mountain Division
538th Frontier Guard Division
General der Infanterie
Hans-Wolfgang Reinhard
Leibnitz, Austria
101st Light Infantry Division
132nd Infantry Division
183rd Infantry Division
LII Infantry
General der Infanterie
Kurt von Briesen
Leibnitz, Austria
79th Infantry Division
125th Infantry Division

Direct command combat arms and combat support units of XLVI Motorised Corps included three motorised heavy artillery battalions, a motorised pioneer battalion and a bridging battalion.[7] XLIX Mountain Corps allocated its two direct command motorised heavy artillery battalions to the 1st Mountain Division.[8] LI Infantry Corps included seven motorised heavy artillery battalions, two assault gun battalions and two motorised pioneer battalions with a large quantity of bridging equipment.[9]

12th Army[edit]

The German 12th Army was commanded by Generalfeldmarschall (Field Marshal) Wilhelm List, and consisted of one mountain, one infantry and one motorised corps.[10] Most of the 12th Army was deployed along the Bulgarian-Greek border in preparation for the invasion of Greece,[11] and of the corps commanded by List, only General der Panzertruppe (Lieutenant General) Georg Stumme's XL Motorised Corps was committed to the invasion of Yugoslavia. For the first phase of the invasion of Yugoslavia, List also commanded the First Panzer Group.[12] Direct command combat arms units of XL Motorised Corps included three motorised heavy artillery battalions and two motorised pioneer battalions with bridging equipment.[13]

Composition of XL Motorised Corps[10][14]
Corps Commander Assembly area Division/Regiment
XL Motorised
General der Panzertruppe
Georg Stumme
southwest of Sofia, Bulgaria
9th Panzer Division
73rd Infantry Division
Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler

First Panzer Group[edit]

The German First Panzer Group was commanded by Generaloberst Paul Ludwig Ewald von Kleist, and consisted of one motorised and one infantry corps,[15] which assembled northwest of Sofia, Bulgaria.[16] While XI Infantry Corps was also subordinated to the First Panzer Group, only one of its divisions participated in the invasion of Yugoslavia. Direct command combat support units of XIV Motorised Corps included two motorised heavy artillery battalions and a motorised pioneer battalion with bridging equipment.[15]

Elements of First Panzer group[6]
Corps Commander Division
XIV Motorised
General der Infanterie
Gustav Anton von Wietersheim
5th Panzer Division
11th Panzer Division
294th Infantry Division
4th Mountain Division
XI Infantry
General der Infanterie
Joachim von Kortzfleisch
60th Motorised Infantry Division

XLI Motorised Corps[edit]

The German XLI Motorised Corps was commanded by General der Panzertruppe (Lieutenant General) Georg-Hans Reinhardt, and was an independent command that assembled near Timisoara, in western Romania. Direct command combat arms units of XLI Motorised Corps included two motorised heavy artillery battalions and a motorised pioneer battalion with bridging equipment.[17]

Composition of XLI Motorised Corps[6]
Corps Division/Regiment
XLI Motorised
SS Motorised Infantry Division Reich
Großdeutschland Motorised Infantry Regiment
General Göring Regiment

Commanders[edit]

Major German formation commanders
seated male in German uniform wearing spectacles
Generaloberst Maximilian von Weichs commanded the 2nd Army 
black and white photograph of a male in German uniform wearing a monocle
General der Panzertruppe Georg Stumme commanded the XL Panzer Corps 
seated male in German dress uniform with gloves and sword
Generaloberst Paul Ludwig Ewald von Kleist commanded the First Panzer Group 
male in German field uniform wearing a peaked cap with goggles resting above the peak
General der Panzertruppe Georg-Hans Reinhardt commanded the independent XLI Panzer Corps 

German Air Force[edit]

The German Air Force (German: Luftwaffe) operated out of bases in Austria, Romania and Bulgaria during the invasion of Yugoslavia. In total, the Germans had over 750 aircraft available to support the invasion of Yugoslavia, more than half of which were positioned in Bulgaria to support the simultaneous invasion of Greece. In total, the Germans fielded 257 fighter aircraft, 56 heavy fighters, more than 300 dive bombers, 95 light bombers, 26 medium bombers and 23 reconnaissance aircraft. In addition, a reconnaissance squadron equipped with Henschel Hs 126 two-seater reconnaissance aircraft was attached to most of the corps headquarters and every panzer division of the German ground forces.[18][19]

4th Air Fleet[edit]

a twin engined aircraft in flight
Junkers Ju 88 divebombers were operated by the 51st Bomber Wing

The Luftwaffe 4th Air Fleet (German: Luftflotte IV) was commanded by General der Flieger (Lieutenant General) Alexander Löhr, and had its headquarters in Vienna,[20] and direct command units based on airfields in western Austria. These units included one squadron (German: Staffel) of the 121st Reconnaissance Group (German: Aufklärungsgruppe 121), the entire 51st Bomber Wing (German: Kampfgeschwader 51, KG 51), and four bomber groups (German: Kampfgruppen) drawn from the 2nd, 3rd and 4th Bomber Wings (KG 2, KG 3 and KG 4). In total, the 4th Air Fleet had 25 medium bombers, 95 light bombers, 38 dive bombers and six reconnaissance aircraft available in Austria to support the invasion of Yugoslavia.[18][21][22]

Composition of 4th Air Fleet
Unit[21] Location[21] Aircraft type[18]
4th Squadron/121st Long Range Reconnaissance Group 6 × Junkers Ju 88D Long-range photo-reconnaissance aircraft
1 × Messerschmitt Bf 110C heavy fighter
Headquarters 2nd Bomber Wing 6 × Dornier Do 17Z light bombers
I Group/2nd Bomber Wing
Zwölfaxing
28 × Dornier Do 17Z light bombers
III Group/2nd Bomber Wing
Zwölfaxing
29 × Dornier Do 17Z light bombers
III Group/3rd Bomber Wing 26 × Dornier Do 17Z light bombers
II Group/4th Bomber Wing 25 × Heinkel He 111P medium bombers
Headquarters 51st Bomber Wing 6 × Dornier Do 17Z light bombers
I Group/51st Bomber Wing
Wiener Neustadt
1 × Junkers Ju 88A dive bomber
II Group/51st Bomber Wing
Wiener Neustadt
18 × Junkers Ju 88A dive bombers
III Group/51st Bomber Wing 19 × Junkers Ju 88A dive bombers

Fliegerführer Graz[edit]

Fliegerführer Graz was commanded by Oberstleutnant (Lieutenant Colonel) Karl Christ, commander of the 3rd Dive Bomber Wing (German: Sturzkampfgeschwader 3, StG 3). It was located in Graz, Austria, and consisted of the headquarters and II Group of StG 3, the headquarters and II Group (German: Jagdgruppe) of the 54th Fighter Wing (German: Jagdgeschwader 54, JG 54) (less one squadron), and I Group of the 27th Fighter Wing (JG 27). In total, Air Command Graz had 54 fighters, 1 medium bomber and 35 dive bombers available to support the invasion of Yugoslavia.[18][21][23][24][25]

Composition of Fliegerführer Graz
Unit Aircraft type
Headquarters 3rd Dive Bomber Wing 1 × Junkers Ju 87B dive bomber
1 x Heinkel He 111H medium bomber[23]
II Group/3rd Dive Bomber Wing 34 × Junkers Ju 87B dive bombers[23]
Headquarters 54th Fighter Wing 3 × Messerschmitt Bf 109E fighters[24]
II Group/54th Fighter Wing (part) 24 × Messerschmitt Bf 109E fighters[24]
I Group/27th Fighter Wing 27 × Messerschmitt Bf 109E fighters[25]

Fliegerführer Arad[edit]

Fliegerführer Arad was commanded by Oberstleutnant Clemens Graf von Schönborn-Wiesentheid, commander of the 77th Dive Bomber Wing (StG 77). With its headquarters in Arad, Romania, it consisted of the headquarters, I and III Groups of StG 77, headquarters, II and III Groups of the 77th Fighter Wing (JG 77), III Group of JG 27, and I Group of the 26th Heavy Fighter Wing (German: Zerstörergeschwader 26, ZG 26). In total, Air Command Arad had 77 fighters, 31 heavy fighters and 68 dive bombers available to support the invasion of Yugoslavia.[18][21][23][24][26]

Composition of Fliegerführer Arad
Unit[21] Location[21] Aircraft type[18]
Headquarters 77th Dive Bomber Wing
Arad
3 × Junkers Ju 87B dive bombers[23]
4 × Messerschmitt Bf 109E fighters
I Group/77th Dive Bomber Wing
Arad
33 × Junkers Ju 87B dive bombers[23]
1 × Messerschmitt Bf 110C heavy fighter
III Group/77th Dive Bomber Wing
Arad
32 × Junkers Ju 87B dive bombers[23]
Headquarters 77th Fighter Wing 6 × Messerschmitt Bf 109E fighters
II Group/77th Fighter Wing
Deta
34 × Messerschmitt Bf 109E fighters
III Group/77th Fighter Wing
Deta
33 × Messerschmitt Bf 109E fighters
I Group/26th Heavy Fighter Wing
Szeged, Hungary
30 × Messerschmitt Bf 110C/E heavy fighters[26]

VIII Air Corps[edit]

a biplane with Nazi German markings in flight
Henschel Hs 123 dive bombers were operated by the 10th Dive Bomber Squadron of the 2nd Demonstration Wing

The VIII Air Corps (German: Fliegerkorps VIII) was commanded by General der Flieger Wolfram Freiherr von Richthofen, who had operational control of all air operations for the invasion.[20] With its headquarters in Gorna Dzhumaya, Bulgaria, it was based at various airfields in western Bulgaria, and consisted of one squadron of the 11th Reconnaissance Group, the headquarters, I and II Groups of the 2nd Dive Bomber Wing (StG 2), I Group of StG 3, the headquarters, II and III Groups of the 27th Fighter Wing, a fighter group and a ground attack group from the 1st Demonstration Wing (German: Lehrgeschwader 1, LG 1), and a reinforced dive bomber group from the 2nd Demonstration Wing. In total, the VIII Air Corps had 126 fighters, 25 heavy fighters, more than 160 dive bombers and 17 reconnaissance aircraft available to support the invasions of both Yugoslavia and Greece.[18][19][23][26]

Composition of VIII Air Corps
Unit[19] Location[19] Aircraft type[18]
Headquarters 2nd Dive Bomber Wing 4 × Junkers Ju 87B[23]
6 × Dornier Do 17P long-range photo-reconnaissance aircraft
I Group/2nd Dive Bomber Wing
Belitsa and Krainici
30 × Junkers Ju 87B dive bombers[23]
9 × Junkers Ju 87R long-range dive bombers[23]
III Group/2nd Dive Bomber Wing
Belitsa and Krainici
35 × Junkers Ju 87B dive bombers[23]
I Group/3rd Dive Bomber Wing
Belitsa
30 × Junkers Ju 87B dive bombers[23]
9 × Junkers Ju 87R long-range dive bombers[23]
I Group/1st Dive Bomber Wing
Krainici
23 × Junkers Ju 87R long-range dive bombers[23]
II Dive Bomber Group/2nd Demonstration Wing 23 × Messerschmitt Bf 109E fighters
10th Dive Bomber Squadron/2nd Demonstration Wing
Krainici
20 × Henschel Hs 123A biplane dive bomber
II Group/26th Heavy Fighter Wing
Kraishte and Vrazhdebna
25 × Messerschmitt Bf 110C/E heavy fighters[26]
Headquarters 27th Fighter Wing
Belitsa and Sofia
5 × Messerschmitt Bf 109E fighters
II Group/27th Fighter Wing
Belitsa and Sofia
37 × Messerschmitt Bf 109E fighters
III Group/27th Fighter Wing
Belitsa and Sofia
39 × Messerschmitt Bf 109E fighters
I Fighter Group/2nd Demonstration Wing
Vrazhdebna
22 × Messerschmitt Bf 109E fighters
I Group/1st Demonstration Wing
Vrazhdebna
Junkers Ju88A dive bombers
2nd Squadron/11th Long Range Reconnaissance Group
Sofia
11 × Dornier Do 17P long-range photo-reconnaissance aircraft
7th Squadron/2nd Demonstration Wing
Vrazhdebna
Messerschmitt Bf 110C heavy fighters
7th Sea Rescue Squadron various floatplanes
IV Group/1st Transport Group Junkers Ju 52/3m transport aircraft

X Air Corps[edit]

The X Air Corps (German: Fliegerkorps X) was based in Sicily, and consisted of four bomber groups, one heavy fighter group and one fighter squadron with a total of 168 aircraft.[27] It was available to provide on-call support to the 4th Air Fleet as required.[1]

Commanders[edit]

Major German Luftwaffe commanders
a standing male in Luftwaffe uniform
General der Flieger Alexander Löhr commanded the 4th Air Fleet during the invasion 
black and white picture of a male in Luftwaffe uniform
General der Flieger Wolfram Freiherr von Richthofen commanded the VIII Air Corps 

Italian[edit]

Italian ground forces[edit]

The Italian 2nd Army and 9th Army committed a total of 22 divisions to the operation,[28] comprising around 300,000 troops.[29]

2nd Army[edit]

The Italian 2nd Army (Italian: 2° Armata) was commanded by Generale designato d’Armata (acting General) Vittorio Ambrosio,[30] and consisted of one fast (Italian: celere) corps, one motorised corps and three infantry corps, and was assembled in northeastern Italy.[31][32] Direct command combat arms and combat support units of the 2nd Army included three bridging battalions, a chemical battalion, fourteen mobile territorial battalions, and two garrison battalions.[33]

Composition of Italian 2nd Army[34]
Corps Commander Division
1st Cavalry Division Eugenio di Savoia
2nd Cavalry Division Emanuele Filiberto Testa di Ferro
3rd Cavalry Division Amedeo Duca d'Aosta
15th Infantry Division Bergamo
57th Infantry Division Lombardia
Generale di Corpo d'Armata
Lorenzo Dalmazzo
12th Infantry Division Sassari
20th Infantry Division Friuli
26th Mountain Infantry Division Assietta
Generale di Divisione
Mario Robotti
13th Infantry Division Re
14th Infantry Division Isonzo
3rd Mountain Infantry Division Ravenna
3rd Alpine Group
Generale di Corpo d'Armata
Francesco Zingales
9th Motorised Division Pasubio
52nd Motorised Division Torino
133rd Armoured Division Littorio

Direct command combat arms units of V Corps included one artillery battalion, two machine gun battalions, and a sapper battalion,[33] as well as two artillery battalions allocated from 2nd Army.[35] VI Corps included one artillery battalion and two machine gun battalions,[36] supplemented by three artillery regiments allocated from 2nd Army.[35] XI Corps included one artillery battalion, two machine gun battalions, and an engineer battalion,[37] with another two artillery battalions allocated from 2nd Army.[35] The Motorised Corps included an artillery battalion and an engineer battalion.[38]

9th Army[edit]

The elements of the Italian 9th Army (Italian: 9° Armata) that were involved in the campaign were commanded by Generale d’Armata (General) Alessandro Pirzio Biroli, and consisted of two infantry corps and some sector troops assembled in northern Albania.[39][40]

Elements of Italian 9th Army[41]
Corps Commander Division
Generale di Divisione
Giovanni Vecchi
38th Infantry Division Puglie
41st Infantry Division Firenze
Generale di Corpo d'Armata
Giuseppe Pafundi
18th Infantry Division Messina
32nd Infantry Division Marche
131st Armoured Division Centauro
Generale di Corpo d'Armata
Gabriele Nasci
53rd Infantry Division Arezzo
41st Infantry Division Firenze
24th Infantry Division Pinerolo

The direct command combat arms units of the XIV Corps included a cavalry regiment, two Blackshirt battalions, one Alpini battalion, three Frontier Guard battalions and one Finance Guard battalion.[42] The XVII Corps included the Diamanti Blackshirt group which incorporated six Blackshirt "legions" (regiments) and the Albanian-raised Skanderbeg Blackshirt group, a cavalry regiment, a Bersaglieri motorcycle battalion, thre Frontier Guard battalions, one Finance Guard battalion, a motorised artillery regiment and a tank company.[43] The Librazhd Sector included a Bersaglieri regiment, a cavalry regiment, one Blackshirt regiment and two Blackshirt battalions, one Alpini battalion, two Finance Guard battalions and four artillery groups.[42]

Royal Italian Air Force[edit]

The Royal Italian Air Force (Italian: Regia Aeronautica) operated out of bases in southeastern and northeastern Italy and Albania during the invasion of Yugoslavia. In total, the Italians had 666 aircraft available to support the invasion, 229 of which were positioned in Albania to also support the German invasion of Greece. These aircraft comprised 318 fighter aircraft, 40 dive bombers, 178 medium bombers, 12 floatplane naval bombers and 118 reconnaissance aircraft.[44]

2nd Air Force[edit]

The headquarters of the 2nd Air Force (Italian: 2nd Squadra Aerea) was at Padua, in northeastern Italy. It comprised two fighter wings, two bomber groups and three reconnaissance groups. In total, the 2nd Air Force had 91 fighters, 29 medium bombers and 49 reconnaissance aircraft available to support the invasion of Yugoslavia.[44]

Composition of Italian 2nd Air Force[45]
Unit Location Aircraft
4th Fighter Wing 46 × Macchi C.200 fighters
54th Fighter Wing 45 × Macchi C.200 fighters
31st Bomber Group 15 × Fiat BR.20 medium bombers
99th Bomber Group 14 × Fiat BR.20 medium bombers
61st Reconnaissance Group
Gorizia
8 × Caproni Ca.311 reconnaissance aircraft
8 × IMAM Ro.37 reconnaissance biplanes
63rd Reconnaissance Group
Udine
14 × IMAM Ro.37 reconnaissance biplanes
71st Reconnaissance Group
Udine/Gorizia
12 × IMAM Ro.37 reconnaissance biplanes
7 × Caproni Ca.311 reconnaissance aircraft

4th Air Force[edit]

The headquarters of the 4th Air Force (Italian: 4th Squadra Aerea) was at Bari, in southern Italy. It comprised two fighter groups, four bomber wings, one combined bomber and naval bomber wing, three bomber groups and one dive bomber group. In total, the 4th Air Force had 87 fighters, 20 dive bombers, 149 medium bombers and 12 naval bombers available to support the invasion of Yugoslavia.[44]

Composition of Italian 4th Air Force[46]
Unit Location Aircraft
8th Independent Fighter Group 14 × Macchi C.200 fighters
153rd Independent Fighter Group 64 × Macchi C.200 fighters
9 × Fiat CR.42 biplane fighters
13th Bomber Wing 24 × Fiat BR.20 medium bombers
37th Bomber Wing 30 × Fiat BR.20 medium bombers
38th Bomber Wing 16 × Fiat BR.20 medium bombers
35th Bomber/Naval Bomber Wing
Brindisi
15 × CANT Z.1007 medium bombers
12 × CANT Z.506 floatplane naval bombers
47th Bomber Wing
Grottaglie
26 × CANT Z.1007 medium bombers
50th Bomber Group
Brindisi
8 × CANT Z.1007 medium bombers
104th Bomber Group
Foggia
15 × Savoia-Marchetti SM.79 medium bombers
105th Bomber Group
Bari
15 × Savoia-Marchetti SM.79 medium bombers
87th Dive Bomber Group
Lecce
20 × Junkers Ju 87B dive bombers[23]

Air Command Albania[edit]

Air Command Albania (Italian: Comando Aeronautica Albania) comprised five fighter groups, one dive bomber group equipped with German Junkers Ju 87B Stuka aircraft, and eight reconnaissance squadrons. In total, the Italians had 140 fighters, 20 dive bombers and 69 reconnaissance aircraft available in Albania to support the invasions of Yugoslavia and Greece.[47]

Composition of Air Command Albania[48]
Unit Location Aircraft
22nd Independent Fighter Group 37 × Macchi C.200 fighters
24th Independent Fighter Group 26 × Fiat G.50 fighters
150th Independent Fighter Group 20 × Macchi C.200 fighters
154th Independent Fighter Group
Devoli
27 × Fiat G.50 fighters
160th Independent Fighter Group
Tirana
30 × Fiat CR.42 biplane fighters
101st Independent Dive Bomber Group
Tirana
20 × Junkers Ju 87B dive bombers[23]
25th Reconnaissance Squadron
Tirana
9 × IMAM Ro.37 reconnaissance biplanes
31st Reconnaissance Squadron 9 × IMAM Ro.37 reconnaissance biplanes
35th Reconnaissance Squadron 9 × IMAM Ro.37 reconnaissance biplanes
39th Reconnaissance Squadron
Berat
9 × IMAM Ro.37 reconnaissance biplanes
42nd Reconnaissance Squadron
Valona
9 × IMAM Ro.37 reconnaissance biplanes
87th Reconnaissance Squadron
Tirana
7 × Caproni Ca.311 reconnaissance aircraft
25th Reconnaissance Squadron
Tirana
8 × Caproni Ca.311 reconnaissance aircraft
25th Reconnaissance Squadron 9 × Caproni Ca.311 reconnaissance aircraft

Aircraft types[edit]

Aircraft types in service with the Royal Italian Air Force
a single-engine monoplane with green and black mottled camouflage paint parked on the tarmac
Macchi C.200 fighters were operated by several Italian fighter wings and independent fighter groups 
a single-engine monoplane parked on grass with men in uniform seated under the fuselage
Junkers Ju 87 dive bombers were operated by two Italian dive bomber groups 
a single-engined monoplane in flight
Fiat G.50 fighters were operated by two fighter groups of Air Command Albania. 

Royal Italian Navy[edit]

Three destroyers of the Royal Italian Navy (Italian: Regia Marina) were deployed into the Adriatic in direct support of the invasion, and other units were tasked to suppress the Royal Yugoslav Navy.[29]

Hungarian[edit]

Royal Hungarian Army[edit]

The Hungarian Army (Hungarian: Magyar Honvédség) committed seven brigades to the invasion force, all drawn from the Mobile, IV or V Corps of Altábornagy (Lieutenant General) Elemér Gorondy-Novák's 3rd Army. The 1st Parachute Battalion was also earmarked for airborne operations, and the I and VII Corps were held in reserve.[49] The Hungarian invasion force was deployed along the Yugoslav border largely between the Danube and the Tisza.[50]

Elements of the Hungarian 3rd Army[49]
Corps Brigade
Mobile Corps
1st Motorised Brigade
2nd Motorised Brigade
2nd Cavalry Brigade
IV Corps
10th Infantry Brigade
11th Infantry Brigade
12th Infantry Brigade
V Corps
14th Infantry Brigade

Royal Hungarian Air Force[edit]

a single engined monoplane on the ground with a person in the cockpit
A Regianne Re.2000 fighter

At the commencement of the invasion, the Royal Hungarian Air Force (Hungarian: Magyar Királyi Honvéd Légierő, MKHL) had 536 aircraft in its inventory. Six fighter squadrons and three bomber squadrons of the 1st Air Brigade of the MKHL were deployed in the southern areas of Hungary.[51] The MKHL had the following types of aircraft in service at the time of the invasion:

Aircraft types[51]
Aircraft type Model Class Number Origin/notes
Fighter aircraft
Fiat CR.32
69
 Italy
Fiat CR.42
68
 Italy
Reggiane Re.2000
34
 Italy
Heinkel He 112
3
 Germany
Bomber aircraft
Junkers Ju 86K-2
medium
34
 Germany
Caproni Ca.135
medium
36
 Italy
Reconnaissance aircraft
Weiss WM-21 Sólyom
48
 Hungary
Heinkel He 46
38
 Germany
IMAM Ro.37
37
 Italy
Heinkel He 111B
13
 Germany

The Hungarians also had a small number of locally made Repülőgépgyár Levente II training and liaison aircraft, various German and Italian trainer aircraft, and four Savoia-Marchetti SM.75 paratroop transports.[51]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Zajac 1993, p. 50.
  2. ^ Lennox 1997, p. D-1.
  3. ^ U.S. Army 1986, pp. 39–41.
  4. ^ U.S. Army 1986, pp. 48–49.
  5. ^ Nafziger 1998a, p. 1.
  6. ^ a b c U.S. Army 1986, p. 41.
  7. ^ Nafziger 1998a, p. 8.
  8. ^ Nafziger 1998a, p. 5.
  9. ^ Nafziger 1998a, pp. 6–7.
  10. ^ a b Zajac 1993, p. 49.
  11. ^ U.S. Army 1986, Map 3.
  12. ^ U.S. Army 1986, p. 32.
  13. ^ Nafziger 1998b, pp. 14–15.
  14. ^ Nafziger 1998b, pp. 14–19.
  15. ^ a b Nafziger 1998b, p. 7.
  16. ^ U.S. Army 1986, p. 50.
  17. ^ Nafziger 1998b, p. 12.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h Shores, Cull & Malizia 1987, pp. 180–181.
  19. ^ a b c d Nafziger 1993a, pp. 1–2.
  20. ^ a b U.S. Army 1986, p. 39.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g Nafziger 1993a, p. 1.
  22. ^ Scutts 1978, p. 39.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Weal 1998, p. 88.
  24. ^ a b c d Weal 2001, p. 121.
  25. ^ a b Weal 2003, p. 45.
  26. ^ a b c d Weal 2012, p. 62.
  27. ^ Barefield 1993, p. 48.
  28. ^ Nafziger 1997, pp. 1–10.
  29. ^ a b Krzak 2006, p. 573.
  30. ^ Loi 1978, p. 32.
  31. ^ Jowett 2000, p. 9.
  32. ^ Loi 1978, pp. 51–54 & 186.
  33. ^ a b Nafziger 1997, p. 2.
  34. ^ Nafziger 1997, pp. 1–7.
  35. ^ a b c Nafziger 1997, p. 1.
  36. ^ Nafziger 1997, p. 3.
  37. ^ Nafziger 1997, p. 4.
  38. ^ Nafziger 1997, p. 6.
  39. ^ Jowett 2000, p. 10.
  40. ^ Loi 1978, p. 76.
  41. ^ Nafziger 1997, pp. 8–10.
  42. ^ a b Nafziger 1997, p. 8.
  43. ^ Nafziger 1997, p. 9.
  44. ^ a b c Shores, Cull & Malizia 1987, pp. 183–184.
  45. ^ Nafziger 1993b, p. 2.
  46. ^ Nafziger 1993b, pp. 1–2.
  47. ^ Shores, Cull & Malizia 1987, p. 183.
  48. ^ Nafziger 1993b, p. 1.
  49. ^ a b Thomas & Szabo 2008, p. 14.
  50. ^ Tomasevich 1975, p. 67.
  51. ^ a b c Szabó 2005, p. 196.

References[edit]

Books[edit]

Journals and papers[edit]

Web[edit]