Aydınids

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"Aydınoğlu" redirects here. For the village in Mersin, see Aydınoğlu, Mut.
Principality of Aydin
Aydınoğulları

1308–1426
Shown as Aydınoğulları, leftmost green.
Capital Birgi, Selçuk
Languages Turkish
Religion Islam
Government Emirate
History
 -  Collapse of the Sultanate of Rum 1308
 -  Annexation by the Ottoman Empire 1426
Today part of  Turkey

The Aydinids or Aydinid dynasty (Modern Turkish: Aydınoğulları, Aydınoğulları Beyliği), also known as the Principality of Aydin and Beylik of Aydin (Aydın Beyliği ), was one of the Anatolian beyliks. Its capital was at first in Birgi, and later in Ayasluğ (present day Selçuk), was one of the frontier principalities established in the 14th century by Oghuz Turks after the decline of Sultanate of Rûm. It is named after its founder Aydınoğlu Mehmed Bey.

İsa Bey Mosque in Selçuk, built by the Aydinids in 1375

The Aydinids also held parts of the port of Smyrna (modern İzmir) all through their rule and all of the port city with intervals. Especially during the reign of Umur Bey, the sons of Aydın were a significant naval power of the time.[1] The naval power of Aydin played a crucial role in the Byzantine civil war of 1341–1347, where Umur allied with John VI Kantakouzenos, but also provoked a Latin response in the form of the Smyrniote crusades, that captured Smyrna from the emirate.

The Beylik was incorporated into the Ottoman Empire for the first time in 1390, and after the passage of Tamerlane in Anatolia in 1402 and the ensuing period of troubles that lasted until 1425, its territories became again part of the Ottoman realm, this time definitively.

The Beys of Aydin left important architectural works, principally in Birgi and Ayasluğ (Selçuk), their capital cities.

The city of Aydın was named after the dynasty.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • İnalcık, Halil (1993). "The Rise of the Turcoman Maritime Principalities in Anatolia, Byzantium, and the Crusades". The Middle East & the Balkans Under the Ottoman Empire: Essays on Economy & Society. Indiana University Turkish Studies Department. pp. 309–341. ISBN 1878318047. 
  • Lemerle, Paul (1957). L'émirat d'Aydin, Byzance et l'Occident: Recherches sur la "Geste d'Umur Pacha". Bibliothèque byzantine: Etudes No. 2 (in French). Paris: Presses Universitaires de France. 
  • Mélikoff, Irene (1986). "Aydi̊̊n-Og̲h̲lu". The Encyclopedia of Islam, New Edition, Volume I: A–B. Leiden and New York: BRILL. ISBN 90-04-08114-3. 
  • Uzunçarşılı, İsmail Hakkı (1984). Anadolu Beylikleri ve Akkoyunlu, Karakoyunlu Devletleri (in Turkish). Ankara: Türk Tarih Kurumu Basımevi. pp. 104–120. OCLC 563553149. 
  • Zachariadou, Elisabeth A. (1983). Trade and crusade: Venetian Crete and the emirates of Menteshe and Aydin (1300-1415). Venice: Istituto Ellenico di Studi Bizantini e Post-bizantini di Venezia. OCLC 144691037. 

Coordinates: 38°05′21″N 27°44′16″E / 38.08917°N 27.73778°E / 38.08917; 27.73778