BBC National Short Story Award

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BBC National Short Story Award is a British literary award for short stories. It was founded in 2005 by the NESTA (the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts) with support from BBC Radio 4 and Prospect magazine.[1] The winner receives GB£15,000 for a single short-story.[1][2] The award was originally known as 'National Short Story Award' and renamed to 'BBC' starting in 2008 to reflect the current sponsor.[1]

The award has been called the richest prize in the world for a single short story,[2] however the Sunday Times EFG Private Bank Short Story Award is greater at GB£30,000.[3]

Normally the award is open to British authors only, in 2012 the award was opened to a global audience for one year only in honour of the 2012 Summer Olympics which were hosted in London.[4]

Winners[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "BBC National Short Story Prize wepage". BBC. Retrieved September 14, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c Richard Lea (4 July 2008). "Field narrows in race for richest story award". The Guardian. Retrieved September 29, 2012. 
  3. ^ Staff writer (19 February 2012). "OMG: Text speak short story in running for £30,000 prize". The Telegraph. Retrieved January 22, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b Alison Flood (September 14, 2012). "Deborah Levy joins shortlist for BBC international short story award". The Guardian. Retrieved September 14, 2012. 
  5. ^ Alison Flood (3 October 2012). "Miroslav Penkov wins BBC international short story award". The Guardian. Retrieved 3 October 2012. 
  6. ^ Liz Bury (8 October 2013). "Sarah Hall's tale of woman who turns into a fox wins BBC short story award". The Guardian. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Sarah Hall wins the BBC National Short Story Award". BBC. 8 October 2013. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Lionel Shriver wins BBC National Short Story Award". BBC News. September 30, 2014. 

External links[edit]