BBC Sports Personality of the Year Coach Award

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Warren Gatland, the winner in 2013

The BBC Sports Personality of the Year Coach Award is an award given annually as part of the BBC Sports Personality of the Year ceremony each December. The award is given to the coach who was considered to have made the most substantative contribution to British sport in that year. The award is decided by a panel of over 30 sporting journalists. Each panelist votes for their top two choices; their first preference is awarded two points, and their second preference is awarded one point. The winning coach is the one with the largest points total. In the case of a points tie, the person chosen as first preference by the most panelists is the winner. If this is also a tie the award is shared.[1]

The first recipient of the award was association football manager Alex Ferguson, in 1999. The award has been presented to a football manager on five occasions. It has been awarded to four Britons, and five of the other six winners were European. Daniel Anderson, the only winner from the Southern Hemisphere, was in his native Australia at the time of the awards, so the then St Helens captain, Paul Sculthorpe, collected it on his behalf.[2] In 2007, Enzo Calzaghe was the first recipient of the award who had coached an individual and not a team. The most recent award was presented in 2013 to Warren Gatland.

Winners[edit]

By year[edit]

Alex Ferguson, the inaugural winner in 1999.
A head-and-shoulders photograph of a gentleman in his 50s. He is wearing a red polo shirt underneath a blue coat, he has grey hair, and his eyes are slightly closed.
Arsène Wenger, two times winner in 2002 and 2004.
José Mourinho, winner in 2005.
A head-shot of a brown-haired man in his sixties. He has blue eyes and is wearing glasses.
Fabio Capello, the winner in 2009
BBC Sports Personality of the Year Coach Award winners
Year Nat. Winner Sport Coach of Rationale Note
1999  SCO Ferguson, AlexAlex Ferguson Football England Manchester United for guiding Manchester United to be "the first side to complete a unique treble" of the Premier League, FA Cup, and Champions League.[3] [4]
2000  GER Gröbler, JürgenJürgen Gröbler Rowing United Kingdom Olympic team for guiding "[Steve] Redgrave, Matthew Pinsent, Tim Foster and James Cracknell to their coxless fours gold" at the Olympics.[5] [6]
2001  SWE Eriksson, Sven-GöranSven-Göran Eriksson Football England England for guiding England through qualification for the World Cup, defeating Germany 5–1 in the process.[7] [8]
2002  FRA Wenger, ArsèneArsène Wenger Football England Arsenal for guiding Arsenal to the Double of the Premiership and FA Cup.[9] [10]
2003  ENG Woodward, CliveClive Woodward Rugby Union England England for guiding "his team to a famous Rugby World Cup victory in Australia."[11] [12]
2004  FRA Wenger, ArsèneArsène Wenger Football England Arsenal for guiding Arsenal to a "third Premiership-winning campaign (...) as his side went through the entire season unbeaten."[13] [14]
2005  POR Mourinho, JoséJosé Mourinho Football England Chelsea for guiding "Chelsea to their first title for 50 years in his first season in charge."[15] [16]
2006  AUS Anderson, DanielDaniel Anderson Rugby League England St Helens RLFC "for guiding the team to Challenge Cup, minor Premiership and Grand Final triumph."[17] [18]
2007  ITA Calzaghe, EnzoEnzo Calzaghe Boxing Wales Joe Calzaghe for training Joe Calzaghe to 44 undefeated fights and 10 years as world champion.[19] [20]
2008  WAL Brailsford, DavidDavid Brailsford Cycling United Kingdom Olympic team for guiding the British Olympic cycling team to "14 medals in total in Beijing, including eight golds."[21] [22]
2009  ITA Capello, FabioFabio Capello Football England England for guiding "England to the 2010 World Cup in South Africa winning an impressive nine out of the 10 qualifiers played".[23]
2010  SCO Montgomerie, ColinColin Montgomerie Golf European Union European Ryder Cup team for guiding Europe to victory in the Ryder Cup. [24]
2011  ZIM Flower, AndyAndy Flower Cricket England England cricket team for guiding England to victory in The Ashes and to the top of the ICC Test Ranking [25]
2012  WAL Brailsford, DavidDavid Brailsford Cycling United Kingdom Olympic team/Team Sky for guiding the British Olympic cycling team to "12 medals in total in London, including eight golds, and for guiding Bradley Wiggins towards winning the Tour de France" [26]
2013  NZL Gatland, WarrenWarren Gatland Rugby Union United Kingdom/Republic of Ireland British and Irish Lions for guiding the British and Irish Lions to a 2-1 series victory over Australia, the first series win since 1997. [27]
2014  IRL McGinley, PaulPaul McGinley Golf European Union European Ryder Cup team for guiding Europe to victory in the Ryder Cup. [28]

By nationality[edit]

This table lists the total number of awards won by coaches of each nationality based on the principle of jus soli.

Winners by nationality
Nationality Number of wins
 France 2
 Italy 2
 Scotland 2
 Wales 2
 Australia 1
 England 1
 Germany 1
 Ireland 1
 New Zealand 1
 Portugal 1
 Sweden 1
 Zimbabwe 1

By sport[edit]

This table lists the total number of awards won by coaches' sporting profession.

Winners by sport
Sporting profession Number of wins
Football 6
Cycling 2
Golf 2
Rugby Union 2
Boxing 1
Cricket 1
Rowing 1
Rugby League 1

References[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^ "Sports Personality voting & judging: Terms & conditions". BBC Sport (BBC). 18 November 2008. Archived from the original on 17 December 2008. Retrieved 17 December 2008. 
  2. ^ Coach of the Year - Daniel Anderson (Streaming Windows Media Player) (Television production). National Exhibition Centre: BBC. 10 December 2006. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  3. ^ "Lewis heads sporting honours". BBC Sport (BBC). 12 December 1999. Archived from the original on 17 December 2008. Retrieved 18 December 2008. 
  4. ^ Telegraph staff (14 November 2008). "Fifty years of Sir Alex Ferguson in football: The highs and the lows". The Daily Telegraph. David and Frederick Barclay. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  5. ^ "Redgrave voted Britain's best". BBC Sport (BBC). 10 December 2000. Archived from the original on 20 December 2008. Retrieved 18 December 2008. 
  6. ^ Lawton, James (12 December 2000). "Foreign coaches speak language of success". The Independent (Independent News & Media). Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  7. ^ "Sports Personality review". BBC Sport (BBC). 9 December 2001. Retrieved 18 December 2008. 
  8. ^ Silver, Neil (10 December 2001). "Beckham is chosen by BBC viewers". The Independent (Independent News & Media). Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  9. ^ "Wenger at the Double". BBC Sport (BBC). 8 December 2002. Retrieved 18 December 2008. 
  10. ^ Akwagyiram, Alexis (9 December 2002). "Marathon winner scoops BBC sports award". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  11. ^ "Woodward named top coach". BBC Sport (BBC). 14 December 2003. Retrieved 18 December 2008. 
  12. ^ Norton, Charlie (15 December 2003). "Wilkinson and Redgrave scoop top BBC awards". The Daily Telegraph. David and Frederick Barclay. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  13. ^ "BBC Sports Personality: The winners". BBC Sport (BBC). 12 December 2004. Retrieved 18 December 2008. 
  14. ^ Rowbottom, Mike (13 December 2004). "Sports Awards: Holmes wins BBC Sports Personality of the Year". The Independent (Independent News & Media). Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  15. ^ "Sports Personality: The winners". BBC Sport (BBC). 11 December 2005. Archived from the original on 17 December 2008. Retrieved 18 December 2008. 
  16. ^ Culf, Andrew (12 December 2005). "Ashes hero Flintoff voted Sports Personality of the Year". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 15 December 2008. 
  17. ^ "Sports Personality: The winners". BBC Sport (BBC). 10 December 2006. Retrieved 17 December 2008. 
  18. ^ Corrigan, James (11 December 2006). "Phillips is surprise winner of top Sports Personality award". The Independent (Independent News & Media). Retrieved 15 December 2008. 
  19. ^ "Calzaghe wins Sports Personality". BBC Sport (BBC). 9 December 2007. Archived from the original on 24 December 2008. Retrieved 18 December 2008. 
  20. ^ Clare, Richard (9 December 2007). "Joe Calzaghe wins BBC Sports Personality". The Daily Telegraph. David and Frederick Barclay. Archived from the original on 7 December 2008. Retrieved 15 December 2008. 
  21. ^ "GB Cycling team secure BBC double". BBC Sport (BBC). 14 December 2008. Archived from the original on 17 December 2008. Retrieved 18 December 2008. 
  22. ^ Roughley, Gregg (14 December 2008). "BBC Sports Personality of the Year 2008 - as it happened". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Archived from the original on 15 December 2008. Retrieved 15 December 2008. 
  23. ^ "Fabio Capello handed BBC Sports Personality Coach prize". BBC Sport (BBC). 13 December 2009. Archived from the original on 14 December 2009. Retrieved 14 December 2009. 
  24. ^ "Colin Montgomerie wins Sports Personality coach award". BBC Sport (BBC). 19 December 2010. Archived from the original on 23 December 2010. Retrieved 20 December 2010. 
  25. ^ "BBC Sport - Sports Personality of the Year 2011: Andy Flower wins coaching award". BBC News. Retrieved 2011-12-22. 
  26. ^ "Sports Personality: Cycling's Dave Brailsford is coach of the year". BBC News. 2012-12-16. Retrieved 2014-12-15. 
  27. ^ "Sports Personality: Lions and Warren Gatland win BBC awards". BBC News. Retrieved 2013-12-15. 
  28. ^ "Sports Personality 2014: Paul McGinley named Coach of Year". BBC News. 2012-12-14. Retrieved 2014-12-15.