BC Children's Hospital Foundation

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BC Children's Hospital Foundation
Sunny Hill entrance.jpg
Entrance to the hospital building
Geography
Location 938 West 28th Ave,, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Organization
Care system Pediatric care
Hospital type Birth to 16 years old
Services
Emergency department Over 37,000 patients per year
Beds 142 [1]
History
Founded 1982
Links
Website www.bcchf.ca
Lists Hospitals in Canada

BC Children’s Hospital Foundation (BCCHF) is a non-profit organization that raises money to support the British Columbia's Children's Hospital. The Foundation works with communities to raise funds for essentials including: life-saving equipment, research into childhood diseases, a wide range of medical staff and community child health education programs. Since 1982, BC Children's Hospital Foundation has worked with children, families, caregivers and hundreds of thousands of British Columbians to give BC Children's Hospital and the Family Research Institute the necessary resources.

SunnyHillHCsign.jpg

In 2000, BCCHF merged with the Sunny Hill Foundation for Children (SHFC), which raises funds for children served by Sunny Hill Health Centre.

List of events[edit]

  • Miracle Weekend
  • A World of Smiles
  • Balding For Dollars
  • BC Children's Hospital Lottery
  • Bublé Gala
  • ChildRun
  • Chinese-Canadian Telethon
  • Crystal Ball
  • Festival of Trees
  • For Children We Care
  • Jeans DayTM
  • Paddle for Kids
  • Radiothons
  • Skate for a Cure
  • Slo-Pitch
  • Sunshine Gala

Annual slo-pitch weekend[edit]

The “Go to Bat for BC Children’s Hospital” Slo-Pitch Weekend is an annual softball fundraiser consisting of approximately eighty corporate teams during the weekend following the Victoria Day long-weekend in May. As many as 1000 people participate in this annual event, raising money in support of BC Children's Hospital.

History[edit]

The “Go to Bat for BC Children’s Hospital” Slo-Pitch Weekend, a long-time signature fundraising event of BC Children's Hospital Foundation, started in 1991. Since then, it has raised over $5 million to date, and in 2008 alone, this event raised over $540,000 for BC kids. Every year, the money goes toward BC Children’s Hospital’s most urgent needs, including specialized equipment and research.

Event[edit]

The event spans three consecutive days, typically during the Friday, Saturday and Sunday following the Victoria Day long-weekend in May. Up to eighty teams are divided into industry sectors such as financial (banks and credit unions), real estate and development, mining, hospitality, retail and wholesale, technology and more. Together, these corporate teams gather to compete in round-robin and competitive divisional softball tournaments.

In addition, there are also recreational round-robin play and creative corporate challenges within the divisions. New in 2009 is the skills competition, where players face-off to raise more money for BC Children’s Hospital, and the Saturday Media Feature game where popular local media personalities will step up to the plate.

During the event, there is also a KidZone geared toward children and activities such as crafts, entertainment, activities, balloons and more. A raffle and daily barbecue is also available at the event.

Jeans Day[edit]

On Jeans Day, people across British Columbia, Canada, wear their jeans and their lapel pin or button acknowledging their support of BC Children's Hospital. Jeans Day typically falls on the last Thursday in April.

Anyone can participate in Jeans Day by purchasing a $20 lapel pin or a $5 button before or on Jeans Day.

Since its inception in 1991, Jeans Day has raised millions of dollars to ensure that children in British Columbia have access to quality pediatric care at BC Children’s Hospital. In 2008, over 180,000 British Columbians purchased Jeans Day lapel pins or buttons and helped raise over $1.25 million for BC Children’s Hospital. Funds raised from Jeans Day goes towards the urgent needs at the hospital funding research, equipment, health promotion and education.

References[edit]

External links[edit]