BFV Hassia Bingen

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BFV Hassia Bingen
logo
Full name Binger Fußball-Vereinigung Hassia e.V.
Founded 1910
Ground Stadion am Hessenhaus
Ground Capacity 5,000
Chairman Bernd Haber
Manager Dietmar Aßmann
League Landesliga Südwest-Ost (VII)
2013–14 12th

The BFV Hassia Bingen is a German association football club from the city of Bingen am Rhein, Rhineland-Palatinate.

Hassia, at times, has played at the highest level of German football, the last time in 1952–53. In 2009–10, the club plays in the tier-five Oberliga Südwest. The club has also enjoyed some German Cup success, reaching the third round of this competition twice.

The club also offers table tennis as a second sport. Its women's team played in the 2nd Bundesliga Süd in 2008–09, earning promotion to the Bundesliga.[1]

Hassia is the Latin name for Hesse.

History[edit]

1910–1945[edit]

BFV Hassia was formed in 1910, but football was first played in Bingen under the name of Hassia in 1908.[2]

The club first rose to top-level football in the region in 1926, when it earned promotion to the Bezirksliga Rheinhessen-Saar. It finished fifth in this league out of ten clubs in its first season there, after which the league was disbanded.[3] The team become part of the new tier-one Bezirksliga Main-Hessen, where it was to play for the next three seasons, being relegated in 1930 after a last-place finish.[4]

Hassia won the promotion round to the Bezirksliga in 1933 and was thereby qualified for the leagues next season.[5] The introduction of the Gauliga system in Germany by the Nazis in 1933 however stopped Hassia from taking up its first-division spot. A reduction in the number of top leagues in Germany to 16 and thereby a reduction of top-league clubs meant, the club was not qualified for the new Gauliga Südwest/Mainhessen. Hassia did not make it into this league during the Gauliga era at all, which lasted until 1945.

1945–1963[edit]

In post-war Germany, Hassia was grouped in the northern division of the tier-one Oberliga Südwest for the 1945–46 season.[6] At this level, the team lasted for only one season before dropping back to the second level.

Football in the region of South West at this level was split into three division at the time, Vorderpfalz, Westpfalz and Rheinhessen.[7] The club played in the Rheinhessen division without coming close to promotion in the coming years. In 1951, Hassia became one of four teams from this league to gain entry to the newly created 2nd Oberliga Südwest, the new second division in the region.[8]

In its first season there, the team finished third, with all teams on places one to four on equal points. This however was enough for Hassia to return to the Oberliga.[9]

The club, in its last first-division season ever, was completely outperformed, finishing last with three points out of 30 games, remaining winless all season. BFV Hassia conceded 142 goals and scored only 32.[10] The following 2nd Oberliga season went better and the team finished sixth. After a seventh place the following year, the club came last once more in 1955–56 and was relegated to the tier-three Amateurliga Südwest.[11]

The club took out the championship in this league in 1957 and 1959. In 1957, the team failed in the promotion round, coming last out of four clubs, but in 1959 it won its group without losing a game and returned to the 2nd Oberliga.[12] The later allowed Hassia to take part in the German amateur football championship, where it went out to FC Singen 04 in the semi-finals.[13]

From 1959 to 1963, Hassia played as a mid-table side in the second division but its results were not good enough to qualify it for the new second-tier Regionalliga Südwest when the Fußball-Bundesliga was introduced in 1963 and the club made a permanent departure from the second level as well.[14]

1963–2006[edit]

Hassia returned to the Amateurliga, a league it would belong to until 1968, finishing in mid-table. In 1967–68, the club suffered another relegation, now to the fourth tier.[15] It took until 1974 to recover from this and return to the Amateurliga.[16]

In 1974, Hassia also opened its new stadium, which had to be sold to the city of Bingen in 1986.[2]

The team entered the first round of the German Cup for the first time in 1975, advancing to the third round, where it was knocked out by SV Röchling Völklingen.[17]

In 1976–77, the club had one more excellent season, finishing second on equal points with champions Wormatia Worms.[18] Qualified for the German amateur championship once more, it went out in the quarter-finals to BFC Preussen.[19] Additionally, it also played in the national cup once more, advancing to the third round after victories over 1. FC Schweinfurt 05 and Sportfreunde Eisbachtal, where it lost 2–1 to SpVgg Bayreuth.[20] The following year, another second place was enough to qualify Hassia for the new Oberliga Südwest.[21] It also made an appearance in the German Cup, losing 1–0 to Stuttgarter Kickers.[22]

The team became a fixture in this league, spending 23 of 28 possible seasons in it until 2006. Only from 1991 to 1994 and again from 2001 to 2003 did the side play in the tier below, now the Verbandsliga Südwest. Its best performance in this era was a fourth place in 1984 and 1996. The five seasons spend in the Verbandsliga in this time, the team always finished in the top-three. It also took part in the first round of the German Cup three more times. In 1981[23] it advanced to the second round after a victory over SpVgg Landshut, in 1983[24] and 1986[25] it was knocked out in the first.

On 2 October 1983 Hassia player Jürgen Wilhelm scored a goal for the club against FC Homburg that was voted as the Goal of the month by German television station ARD.[26] This goal then went on to win the Goal of the year award.[27]

2006–present[edit]

After finishing second-last in 2005–06 in the Oberliga, only insolvent SV Weingarten below the club, the team was relegated to the Verbandsliga once more.[28] Back in what was now the fifth division, Hassia struggled, unlike on previous occasions, coming ninth and eleventh in the next two seasons. The club did however not share the fate of many other former Oberliga greats who dropped down the league system and recovered. A league title in 2008–09 meant a return to the Oberliga once more for 2009–10.

The club lasted fopr only one season in the Oberliga before returning to the Verbandsliga where it played until 2013 when another relegation meant a drop to the Landesliga.

Honours[edit]

The club's honours:

Recent seasons[edit]

The recent season-by-season performance of the club:[29][30]

Season Division Tier Position
1999–2000 Oberliga Südwest IV 13th
2000–01 Oberliga Südwest 19th ↓
2001–02 Verbandsliga Südwest V 3rd
2002–03 Verbandsliga Südwest 1st ↑
2003–04 Oberliga Südwest IV 13th
2004–05 Oberliga Südwest 9th
2005–06 Oberliga Südwest 17th ↓
2006–07 Verbandsliga Südwest V 8th
2007–08 Verbandsliga Südwest 11th
2008–09 Verbandsliga Südwest VI 1st ↑
2009–10 Oberliga Südwest V 18th ↓
2010–11 Verbandsliga Südwest VI 11th
2011–12 Verbandsliga Südwest 10th
2012–13 Verbandsliga Südwest 15th ↓
2013–14 Landesliga Südwest VII 12th
2014–15 Landesliga Südwest

References[edit]

  1. ^ BFV Hassia Bingen table tennis website (German) accessed: 13 July 2009
  2. ^ a b Die Hassia Story (German) BFV Hassia website, accessed: 13 July 2009
  3. ^ Fussball-Jahrbuch Deutschland 1924/25-1926/27 (German) publisher: DSFS, page: 159
  4. ^ Fussball-Jahrbuch Deutschland 1927/28-1929/30 (German) publisher: DSFS, page: 151
  5. ^ Fussball-Jahrbuch Deutschland 1930/31-1932/33 (German) publisher: DSFS, page: 176
  6. ^ Oberliga Südwest 1945/46 Das Deutsche Fussball Archiv, accessed: 13 July 2009
  7. ^ Süddeutschlands Fussball Geschichte in Tabellenform 1897–1988 (German) History of Southern German football, author: Ludolf Hyll, page: 145
  8. ^ Süddeutschlands Fussball Geschichte in Tabellenform 1897–1988 (German) History of Southern German football, page: 163
  9. ^ Süddeutschlands Fussball Geschichte in Tabellenform 1897–1988 (German) History of Southern German football, page: 166
  10. ^ Süddeutschlands Fussball Geschichte in Tabellenform 1897–1988 (German) History of Southern German football, page: 170
  11. ^ Süddeutschlands Fussball Geschichte in Tabellenform 1897–1988 (German) History of Southern German football, page: 184
  12. ^ Die Deutsche Liga Chronik (German) publisher: DSFS, page: H 39
  13. ^ kicker Almanach 1990 (German) publisher: kicker, page: 184
  14. ^ Süddeutschlands Fussball Geschichte in Tabellenform 1897–1988 (German) History of Southern German football, page: 213
  15. ^ Süddeutschlands Fussball Geschichte in Tabellenform 1897–1988 (German) History of Southern German football, page: 237
  16. ^ Süddeutschlands Fussball Geschichte in Tabellenform 1897–1988 (German) History of Southern German football, page: 262
  17. ^ Hassia Bingen .:. Termine & Ergebnisse 1975/1976 (German) Weltfussball.de – Hassia Bingen results 1975–76, accessed: 13 July 2009
  18. ^ Süddeutschlands Fussball Geschichte in Tabellenform 1897–1988 (German) History of Southern German football, page: 268
  19. ^ kicker Almanach 1990 (German) publisher: kicker, page: 187
  20. ^ Hassia Bingen .:. Termine & Ergebnisse 1976/1977 (German) Weltfussball.de – Hassia Bingen results 1976–77, accessed: 13 July 2009
  21. ^ Süddeutschlands Fussball Geschichte in Tabellenform 1897–1988 (German) History of Southern German football, page: 271
  22. ^ Hassia Bingen .:. Termine & Ergebnisse 1977/1978 (German) Weltfussball.de – Hassia Bingen results 1977–78, accessed: 13 July 2009
  23. ^ Hassia Bingen .:. Termine & Ergebnisse 1981/1982 (German) Weltfussball.de – Hassia Bingen results 1981–82, accessed: 13 July 2009
  24. ^ Hassia Bingen .:. Termine & Ergebnisse 1983/1984 (German) Weltfussball.de – Hassia Bingen results 1983–84, accessed: 13 July 2009
  25. ^ Hassia Bingen .:. Termine & Ergebnisse 1986/1987 (German) Weltfussball.de – Hassia Bingen results 1986–87, accessed: 13 July 2009
  26. ^ Oktober 1983 (German) ARD website – Describtion of the goal, accessed: 13 July 2009
  27. ^ Vereinshöhepunkte (German) BFV Hassia website – Highlights, accessed: 13 July 2009
  28. ^ Oberliga Südwest 2005/2006 Weltfussball.de, accessed: 13 July 2009
  29. ^ Das deutsche Fußball-Archiv (German) Historical German domestic league tables
  30. ^ Fussball.de – Ergebnisse (German) Tables and results of all German football leagues

Sources[edit]

  • Süddeutschlands Fussball Geschichte in Tabellenform 1897–1988 (German) History of Southern German football in tables, author: Ludolf Hyll

External links[edit]