BMW M78

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BMW M78
Overview
Manufacturer BMW
Production 1933–1950
Combustion chamber
Configuration straight-6
Chronology
Predecessor none
Successor BMW M337

The BMW M78 is a straight-six OHV piston engine.[1] It is the first straight-six automobile engine produced by BMW.[2] The engine initially had the same bore and stroke as the four cylinder engine from the BMW 3/20; the bore spacing was increased to allow for further increases in bore and to provide for more crankshaft bearings. The engine was designed by Fritz Fiedler.[3]

Models[edit]

Model Displacement Power Torque Redline Year
303 version 1,182 cc 22 kW (30 PS; 30 hp) 68 N·m (50 lb·ft) 1933-1934
315 version 1,389 cc 25 kW (34 PS; 34 hp) 1934-1937
315/1 version 1,389 cc 30 kW (41 PS; 40 hp) 1934-1937
319 version 1,911 cc 34 kW (46 PS; 46 hp) 1935-1937
319/1 version 1,911 cc 41 kW (56 PS; 55 hp) 1935-1937
326 version 1,971 cc 37 kW (50 PS; 50 hp) 1936-1950
320 version 1,971 cc 34 kW (46 PS; 46 hp) 1937-1938
327 version 1,971 cc 41 kW (56 PS; 55 hp) 1937-1953

M78 (303 version)[edit]

This first version of the M78 used a bore of 56 mm (2.2 in) and a stroke of 80 mm (3.1 in), with a compression ratio of 5.6:1.[3] It produced 22 kW (30 PS; 30 hp) at 4000 rpm and 68 Nm[1] (at unknown rpm).


Applications:

  • 1933-1934 303

M78 (315 version)[edit]

A development of the 303 version, where the bore was increased from 56 mm (2.2 in) to 58 mm (2.3 in) and the stroke was increased from 80 mm (3.1 in) to 94 mm (3.7 in).[3][4] The compression ratio remained at 5.6:1.[4][5]> This engine produced 25 kW (34 PS; 34 hp) at 4000 rpm.[5]


Applications:

  • 1934-1937 315

M78 (315/1 version)[edit]

An upgraded version of the 315 engine with the compression ratio increased to 6.8:1[4][6] and using three Solex carburetors.[4][6] This version produces 30 kW (41 PS; 40 hp) at 4000 rpm.[6]


Applications

M78 (319 version)[edit]

The 315 engine was enlarged to 1911 cc for the 319.[7] This was a result of increasing the bore to 65 mm (2.6 in) and the stroke to 96 mm (3.8 in). This engine produced 45 bhp (34 kW) at 3750 rpm.[8]


Applications:

M78 (319/1 version)[edit]

The 315/1 engine was enlarged to 1911 cc for the 319/1.[7] This was a result of increasing the bore to 65 mm (2.6 in) and the stroke to 96 mm (3.8 in). This engine produced 55 bhp (41 kW) at 4000 rpm.[8]


Applications:

M78 (326 version)[edit]

The 319 engine was enlarged to 1971 cc for the 326 by increasing the bore by one millimetre to 66 mm (2.6 in). Twin 26 mm Solex carburetors were used. The compression ratio was raised to 6.0:1.[9] This engine produced 50 PS (37 kW) at 3750 rpm.[9][10]


Applications:

M78 (320 version)[edit]

The 326 engine was detuned (by using a single carburetor) for the 320 and 321. This engine produces 34 kW (46 PS; 46 hp) at 3750 rpm.[11]


Applications:

M78 (327 version)[edit]

The 327 used a version of the 326 engine with a new cylinder head, yielding a 6.3:1 compression ratio and a slight power increase to 55 bhp (41 kW; 56 PS) at 4500 rpm[12]


Applications:

M337[edit]

Main article: BMW M337

The post-war BMW 501 was powered by an updated version of the M78. Redesignated the M337, the updated engine had a revised cylinder head, a completely new inlet manifold, and a reinforced crankshaft with bigger, more modern bearings.[13][14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "1933 BMW 303 Saloon technical specifications". Carfolio.com. Retrieved 2012-06-03. 
  2. ^ Murphy, Tom (2007-11-19). "Inline-6 Helped Forge BMW Brand | News & Analysis content from". WardsAuto. Retrieved 2012-06-03. 
  3. ^ a b c Norbye, pp. 33-36
  4. ^ a b c d Norbye, pp.39-40
  5. ^ a b "1934 BMW 315 Saloon technical specifications". Carfolio.com. Retrieved 2012-06-03. 
  6. ^ a b c "1934 BMW 315/1 Sport technical specifications". Carfolio.com. Retrieved 2012-06-03. 
  7. ^ a b "1935 BMW 319 Saloon technical specifications". Carfolio.com. Retrieved 2012-06-03. 
  8. ^ a b Norbye, p.44
  9. ^ a b Norbye, p.46
  10. ^ "326 Cabrio and Limousine". usautoparts.net. Retrieved 2008-02-10. 
  11. ^ "1937 BMW 320 Saloon technical specifications". Carfolio.com. Retrieved 2012-06-03. 
  12. ^ Norbye, p.68
  13. ^ Norbye, p.88
  14. ^ Auto- und Motorrad-Welt (in German) (Köln: Deutscher Sportverlag Kurt Stoof). 20 March 1953.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  • Norbye, Jan P. (1984). BMW - Bavaria's Driving Machines. Skokie, IL: Publications International. ISBN 0-517-42464-9.