Babaria

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Babaria / Bawaria / Bavaria are a Rajput clan found mainly in Gujarat State of India.[1][2]

Babaria Rajputs[edit]

Babaria claim their descant from Soomra Dynasty of Sindh, who migrated and remained Hindu unlike other Soomras (a branch of Yaduvanshi Ahirs) who, converted to Islam.[2]

Babarias have strong association with Kathi tribe and Ahirs of Gujarat.[3] Further, they had matrimonial relations with Solanki Rajputs of Diu[3] At the time of immigration of Kathis to Kathiawar, Babarias were already settled here in an area named Babariawad after them. But they were soon driven out of Thangadh and reduced to minority landholders.[3]

In British India, Babariawad, named after Babarias, was the easternmost district of Princely State of Junagadh, in south central Kathiawar. It consisted then of some 51 villages.[citation needed]

Babarias are haughty and war like people than Ahirs. The Ahirs give their daughter in marriage to Babarias and Babarias give their daughters to Kathis. Kathis generally do not give their daughters to Babarias, however, they do not hesitate to give daughter to a Babaria family, if the family is rich.[3]Babarias consist of 72 clan surnames.[3]

Babaria Kathis[edit]

There is also a caste called Babaria Kathis, which have spurn from marriage between Babaria Rajputs & Kathis and have clan surnames like Kotila, Varu, Dhankhada, etc.[4]

Babaria Kolis[edit]

In Gujarat some Kolis are of Rajput descant. Chunvalia Kolis and Khasia Kolis have Rajput surnames like Parmar, Solanki, Babaria, Dabhi, Makwana, Gohil, etc.[5][6]

Babaria others[edit]

In some other casts like Leva Patil, Kadva Patil, Patidar, etc. Babaria surname is found but those are not caste centric but adopted after place of their living, Babariawad.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Bavaria call themselves as Thakur and use Rajput clan name as their own.Human science: journal of the Anthropological Survey of India, Volume 33
  2. ^ a b [1] Gujarat State Gazetteers: Surendranagar.
  3. ^ a b c d e [2] The Rajputs of Saurashtra By Virbhadra Singhji.
  4. ^ [3] Folk art and culture of Gujarat: guide to the collection of the Shreyas Folk Museum of Gujarat
  5. ^ [4] Census of India, 1961, Volume 5, Part 6, Issue 8.
  6. ^ [5] The Rajputs of Saurashtra