Babler State Park

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Dr. Edmund A. Babler Memorial State Park
Missouri State Park
Babler Memorial - 20131102-114.jpg
Country United States
State Missouri
County St. Louis
City Wildwood
Elevation 587 ft (179 m) [1]
Coordinates 38°37′14″N 90°41′45″W / 38.62056°N 90.69583°W / 38.62056; -90.69583Coordinates: 38°37′14″N 90°41′45″W / 38.62056°N 90.69583°W / 38.62056; -90.69583 [1]
Area 2,441 acres (988 ha) [2]
Founded June 23, 1937
Management Missouri Department of Natural Resources
Location in Missouri
Website: Babler State Park
Dr. Edmund A. Babler Memorial State Park Historic District
Nearest city Grover, Missouri
Area 2,325 acres (941 ha)
Built 1935 (1935)
Architectural style Rustic
Governing body State
MPS ECW Architecture in Missouri State Parks 1933-1942 TR
NRHP Reference # 85000539[3]
Added to NRHP February 27, 1985

Dr. Edmund A. Babler Memorial State Park (commonly Babler State Park) is located in Wildwood, Missouri. A large bronze statue of Dr. Babler (pictured at right) greets park visitors. Park activities include hiking, picnicking, bicycling, horseback riding and camping.[4]

History[edit]

The park was created in memory of Edmund A. Babler, who was born on October 11, 1874, in Appleton City, Missouri.[5] He graduated from Missouri Medical College, now known as Washington University Medical School, in 1898, became a general surgeon, developed a large private practice in St. Louis.[6] The stories say that he spent the majority of his time devoting himself to charity cases and took much pride in his work for the unfortunate.[7] His premature death at age 55 from pneumonia was a source of great sadness for his admirers and family. His funeral was one of the largest ever held in St. Louis.[6]

Moved by the public sympathy and respect, Edmund's brother Jacob L. Babler began searching for a way to preserve his brother's memory. Being a successful business graduate from St. Louis Law School, known today as Washington University, he had extensive investments in farm land and real estate. On August 20, 1930, Jacob Babler and his younger brother Henry Babler gave 868 acres of land to the State of Missouri, to be named the Dr. Edmund A. Babler Memorial State park. These were difficult and trying times in the world, and although they continued to give more land to the state between 1934 and 1936, Jacob had to seek the help of friend John J. Cochran, Congressman, in order to obtain federal aid for the state in order to develop the park. This aid came in the form of designating two Civilian Conservation Camps (CCC) to be stationed within the park to develop the property. With the help of Conrad Wirth, Director of the National Park System, plans were developed to establish a trust fund that would support construction, maintenance, and operations at the park. A state bill was passed to fomarlly accept the land and was signed by Governor Lloyd Stark on June 23, 1937. The park was formally dedicated on October 1, 1938 at a ceremony in which Harold Ickes, Secretary of the Interior, spoke before an assembly of 3,500 guests. This was when the statue of Dr. Babler was unveiled in its current location.

Jacob Babler continued throughout the rest of his life to support the park dedicated to his brother, and the Missouri State Park system as a whole. He sponsored a proposal before the Constitution Convention of 1944, resulting in a fund developed to earmark $400,000 a year for 15 years to be used to acquire and develop additional land in the Missouri State Park System. Overcoming the lull of park development during the Great Depression and World War II, some of our most popular Missouri State Parks were acquired and developed between 1946 and 1960. Jacob L. Babler's support of the park system earned him the title of "Father of Missouri's State Parks".[8]

Activities and amenities[edit]

The parks offers multiple hiking trails, a 2-mile (3.2 km) paved bicycle trail, and a 6-mile (9.7 km) equestrian trail.[9] There is also a campground[10] and picnicking areas.[11]

Shaded campsites at Babler
Cochran picnic shelter

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Babler State Park". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. 
  2. ^ "State parks...estimated acres" (PDF). Revised Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan: 2008-2012. Missouri Department of Natural Resources. pp. 142–143. Retrieved September 9, 2014. 
  3. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  4. ^ "Babler State Park". Missouri State Parks. Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved September 9, 2014. 
  5. ^ "St. Louis County, Missouri". Genealogy Trails. Retrieved September 12, 2014.  |chapter= ignored (help)
  6. ^ a b Tom Uhlenbrock (October 2, 2013). "Dr. Edmund A. Babler Memorial State Park Celebrates 75th Anniversary" (Press release). Missouri DNR. Retrieved September 12, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Dr. Edmund A. Babler". Find A Grave, Inc. Retrieved September 12, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Babler State Park’s Historic Past" (PDF). River Hills Current. Dr. Edmund A. Babler Memorial State Park. Fall 2011. Retrieved September 12, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Trails at Dr. Edmund A. Babler Memorial State Park". Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved September 12, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Camping at Dr. Edmund A. Babler Memorial State Park". Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved September 12, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Picnic Areas at Dr. Edmund A. Babler Memorial State Park". Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved September 12, 2014. 

External links[edit]