Backhousia

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Backhousia
Backhousia citriodora.jpg
Backhousia citriodora foliage and flowers
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Myrtales
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Backhousia
Hook. & Harv.[1]
Species

See text.

Backhousia is a genus of thirteen species of flowering plants in the family Myrtaceae.[1] They grow naturally in the rainforests and seasonally dry rainforests of eastern Australia.[1]

They are aromatic shrubs or trees growing to 5–25 m (20–80 ft) tall, with leaves 3–12 cm (1.2–4.7 in) long and 1–6 cm (0.4–2.4 in) broad, arranged opposite to each other.

Species[edit]

This listing was sourced from the authoritative Australian Plant Census and Australian Plant Name Index as of June 2014.[1] For taxa further afield outside Australia, for example species in New Guinea, this list may be incomplete.


Formerly included here

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Backhousia%". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), Integrated Botanical Information System (IBIS) database (listing by % wildcard matching of all taxa relevant to Australia). Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government. Retrieved 26 Apr 2013. 
  2. ^ Ford, Andrew J.; Craven, Lyndley A.; Brophy, J. J. (2005). "Backhousia enata A.J.Ford, Craven & J.Holmes (Myrtaceae), a new species from north-eastern Queensland". Austrobaileya 7 (1). pages 121–127, fig. 1, map 1. Retrieved 1 Nov 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d Harrington, Mark G.; Jackes, Betsy R.; Barrett, M. D. et al. (2012). "Phylogenetic revision of Backhousieae (Myrtaceae): Neogene divergence, a revised circumscription of Backhousia and two new species". Australian Systematic Botany 25: 409–414. doi:10.1071/sb12015. Retrieved 16 May 2013. 
  4. ^ Bean, A. R. (2003). "Backhousia oligantha (Myrtaceae), a new species from Queensland". Austrobaileya 6 (3). pages 533–536, fig. 1, map 1. Retrieved 1 Nov 2013. 
  5. ^ "Mystery Tree April 2010; Update 2012 Backhousia tetraptera" (website). The Society for Growing Australian Plants Townsville Branch Inc. 2012. Retrieved 16 May 2013. 
  6. ^ Wilson, Paul G.; O'Brien, M. M.; Quinn, Chris J. (2000). "Anetholea (Myrtaceae), a new genus for Backhousia anisata: a cryptic member of the Acmena alliance". Australian Systematic Botany 13 (3): 429–435. 
  7. ^ Craven, Lyndley A.; Biffin, Ed (2005). "Anetholea anisata transferred to, and two new Australian taxa of, Syzygium (Myrtaceae)". Blumea 50 (1): 157–162. doi:10.3767/000651905x623346. Retrieved 16 May 2013.