Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein
Identifiers
Symbol BPI
Entrez 671
HUGO 1095
OMIM 109195
RefSeq NM_001725
UniProt P17213
Other data
Locus Chr. 20 q11.23

Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) is a 456-residue (~50kDa) protein that is part of the innate immune system.[1]

Distribution and function[edit]

BPI was initially identified in neutrophils, but is found in other tissues including the epithelial lining of mucous membranes.[2] It is an endogenous antibiotic protein with potent killing activity against Gram-negative bacteria. It binds to compounds called lipopolysaccharides produced by Gram-negative bacteria. Lipolysaccharides are potent activators of the immune system; however, BPI at certain concentrations can prevent this activation.

BPI was discovered by Jerrold Weiss and Peter Elsbach at New York University Medical School.

rBPI21[edit]

Because lipopolysaccharides are potent inflammatory agents, and the action of antibiotics can result in the release of these compounds, the binding capacity of BPI was explored as a possible means of reducing injury. Xoma Ltd. developed a recombinant 25kDa portion of the BPI molecule called rBPI21, NEUPREX, or opebecan. In a trial, it was found to decrease the mortality of Gram-negative bacterial-induced sepsis.[3] Studies suggest that its binding activity is not the means by which it mediates its protective effect.[4] Studies show biological effects with Gram-positive bacteria[5] and even in infection by the protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Elsbach, Peter (July 1, 1998). "The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) in antibacterial host defense" (pdf). Journal of Leukocyte biology (USA: Wiley-Liss) 64 (1): 14–18. ISSN 0741-5400. PMID 9665269. Retrieved 2008-04-08. 
  2. ^ Geraldine Canny; Ofer Levy; Glenn T. Furuta; Sailaja Narravula-Alipati; Richard B. Sisson; Charles N. Serhan; Sean P. Colgan (2002-03-19). "Lipid mediator-induced expression of bactericidal/ permeability-increasing protein (BPI) in human mucosal epithelia". PNAS (USA: National Academy of Sciences) 99 (6): 3902–3907. doi:10.1073/pnas.052533799. ISSN 0027-8424. PMC 122621. PMID 11891303. Retrieved 2008-04-08. 
  3. ^ Michael Levin; Peter A Quint, Brahm Goldstein, Phil Barton, John S Bradley, SD Shemie, Timothy Yeh, Sun Sook Kim, Daniel P Cafaro, Patrick J Scannon and Brett P Giroir (September 16, 2000). "Recombinant bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (rBPI21) as adjunctive treatment for children with severe meningococcal sepsis: a randomised trial". Lancet (England: Lancet Publishing Group) 356 (9234): 961–967. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(00)02712-4. ISSN 0140-6736. PMID 11041396. Retrieved 2008-04-09. Lay summaryBusiness Wire (2000-09-14). 
  4. ^ G Schlag; H Redl; J Davies; P Scannon (February 1999). "Protective effect of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (rBPI21) in baboon sepsis is related to its antibacterial, not antiendotoxin, properties". Annals of Surgery (US: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins) 229 (2): 262–271. doi:10.1097/00000658-199902000-00015. ISSN 0003-4932. PMC 1191640. PMID 10024109. 
  5. ^ Amit Srivastava; Heather Casey; Nathaniel Johnson; Ofer Levy; Richard Malley (January 2007). "Recombinant Bactericidal/Permeability-Increasing Protein rBPI21 Protects against Pneumococcal Disease". Infection and Immunity (US: American Society for Microbiology) 75 (1): 342–349. doi:10.1128/IAI.01089-06. ISSN 0019-9567. PMC 1828387. PMID 17101667. 
  6. ^ Anis A. Khan; Lewis H. Lambert Jr., Jack S. Remington, and Fausto G. Araujo (April 1, 1999). "Recombinant Bactericidal/Permeability-Increasing Protein (rBPI21) in Combination with Sulfadiazine Is Active against Toxoplasma gondii". Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (US: American Society for Microbiology) 43 (4): 758–762. ISSN 0066-4804. PMC 89203. PMID 10103177. Retrieved 2008-04-09. 

External links[edit]