Bad Influence (Robert Cray album)

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Bad Influence
Studio album by The Robert Cray Band
Released 1983
Genre Blues
Length 41:57
Label Hightone
Producer Bruce Bromberg, Dennis Walker
The Robert Cray Band chronology
Who's Been Talkin'
1980
Bad Influence
1983
False Accusations
1985
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
allmusic 5/5 stars[1]
Robert Christgau B+[2]

Bad Influence is a 1983 album by the blues singer-songwriter and guitarist Robert Cray.

Released with Hightone Records, this was the album thought to have put Cray on the map, prior to his explosion into the mainstream with Strong Persuader in 1986. It was his second release and his first on High Tone Records. It contained two cover versions: Johnny Guitar Watson's "Don't Touch Me" and Eddie Floyd's "Got to Make a Comeback". The most well-known songs off the album are probably the funky minor-key blues song "Phone Booth", later covered by Cray's idol Albert King, & the title track which was subsequently covered by Eric Clapton . Bruce Bromberg and Dennis Walker produced the album for the California-based High Tone Records. To date the album sold over a million copies.

Track listing[edit]

  1. "Phone Booth" (Robert Cray, Richard Cousins, Dennis Walker) (3:32)
  2. "Bad Influence" (Cray, Mike Vannice) (2:56)
  3. "Grinder" (Cray, D. Amy) (4:09)
  4. "To Make a Comeback" (Eddie Floyd) (5:52)
  5. "So Many Women, So Little Time" (Oscar Washington) (4:01)
  6. "Where Do I Go from Here" (Cray, Mike Vannice, Dennis Walker) (4:03)
  7. "Waiting for the Tide to Turn" (Cray, Mike Vannice, Dennis Walker) (3:31)
  8. "March On'" (Cray) (2:25)
  9. "Don't Touch Me" (Johnny "Guitar" Watson, Shawn Dewey) (3:25)
  10. "No Big Deal" (Cray, D. Amy) (4:14)

Bonus Tracks

  1. "I Got Loaded" (Robert Camille) (3:37)
  2. "Share What You've Got, Keep What You Need" (Booker T. Jones, Steve Cropper) (3:50)

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Christgau, Robert (January 24, 1984). "Christgau's Consumer Guide". The Village Voice (New York). Retrieved April 29, 2013.