Bahawalnagar

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بہاولنگر
(Urdu)
Town
Bahawalnagar
Bahawalnagar.jpg
بہاولنگر is located in Pakistan
بہاولنگر
بہاولنگر
Location in Pakistan
Coordinates: 30°00′N 73°15′E / 30.000°N 73.250°E / 30.000; 73.250
Country Pakistan
Province Punjab
District Bahawalnagar District
Tehsil Bahawalnagar Tehsil
Elevation 509 ft (155 m)
Population (2012)
 • Total 144,127
Time zone PST (UTC+5)
 • Summer (DST) +6 (UTC)

Bahawalnagar (Punjabi,Urdu: بہاولنگر‎), is the capital city of Bahawalnagar District in the Punjab province of Pakistan. It also contains the administrative headquarters of the tehsil.[1]

Sports ground[edit]

Haider Stadium is the biggest stadium of Bahawalnagar City as well as Bahawalnagar District.

History[edit]

Bahawalnagar District, situated in the Punjab province of Pakistan, was an agricultural region with forests during the Indus Valley Civilization. The Vedic period is characterized by Indo-Aryan culture that invaded from Central Asia and settled in Punjab region. The Kambojas, Daradas, Kaikayas, Madras, Pauravas, Yaudheyas, Malavas and Kurus settled and ruled ancient Punjab region. After overrunning the Achaemenid Empire in 331 BCE, Alexander marched into present-day Punjab region with an army of 50,000. The Bahawalnagar was ruled by Maurya Empire, Indo-Greek kingdom, Kushan Empire, Gupta Empire, White Huns, Kushano-Hephthalites and Shahi kingdoms. Bahwalnagar was ruled by Rajpoot kings (Chandar Gupat, Maharaja Bakarmajeet, Ashoka, Raja Chandar Bhan Singh, Sabdal Rao, Sodha Rao Hameer) for many years. In 997 CE, Sultan Mahmud Ghaznavi, took over the Ghaznavid dynasty empire established by his father, Sultan Sebuktegin, In 1005 he conquered the Shahis in Kabul in 1005, and followed it by the conquests of Punjab region. The Delhi Sultanate and later Mughal Empire ruled the region. The Punjab region became predominantly Muslim due to missionary Sufi saints whose dargahs dot the landscape of Punjab region. From 1690 A.D. to 14 October 1955 Bahawalnagar District was occupied by Daudpota Abbasid and it became one of the districts of Bahawalpur (princely state). The town was named after an Abbasid nawab, Nawab Mohammad Bahawal Khan Abbasi IV.[2]

After the decline of the Mughal Empire, the Sikh invaded the various districts of the Punjab but Bahawalnagar District was not under Sikh rule because it was the part of former Muslim Abbasid state Bahawalpur (princely state). During the period of British rule, Bahawalnagar increased in population and importance.

The predominantly Muslim population supported Muslim League and Pakistan Movement. After the independence of Pakistan in 1947, the minority Hindus and Sikhs migrated to India while the Muslims refugees from India settled down in the Bahawalnagar District.

Languages[edit]

As per national census of 1998, Punjabi is the main language of Bahawalnagar district and is spoken by 1.3 Million people which accounts for 90% of total population of 1.37 Million.[3] Urdu is the national language and is spoken widely while English is spoken by educated elite. According to latest census Haryanvi is the second major language of Bahawalnagar District and spoken by 1 million people of total approximately 3 million population. Riasti (Saraiki) is also spoken by 42,000 people (3%) of the district population.

Administration[edit]

Bahawalnagar is the administrative center of Bahawalnagar District, one of the five tehsils or subdivisions of the district, the tehsil is subdivided into 31 Union Councils.[1] The Bahawal Nagar is the district headquarters of tehsils Haroonabad, Chistian, Fortabbass and Minchanabad. t is one of the largest districts of Panjab with respect to its area. The largest union council of Bahawal Nagar is U.C 6.Tthe main towns of bahawalnagar city are model town,farooqabad, khadimabad colony, islamnagar, jahangirtown, faisal colony, nizampura, wukla colony, hussainabad, officer colony, qaimabad, jinnah colony,madni colony,nazira bad, mouchi pura ,wapda colony ,railway colony ,and madina town . [4]

Climate[edit]

Bahawalnagar has a hot desert climate (Köppen climate classification BWh) with hot summers and mild winters. Precipitation mostly falls in the monsoon season from June to August, although some rain also falls from February to April.

Climate data for Bahawalnagar
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 29.3
(84.7)
35.6
(96.1)
39.4
(102.9)
45.6
(114.1)
48.0
(118.4)
50.1
(122.2)
46.0
(114.8)
42.4
(108.3)
42.0
(107.6)
40.0
(104)
37.0
(98.6)
29.6
(85.3)
50.1
(122.2)
Average high °C (°F) 20.6
(69.1)
22.76
(72.97)
28.3
(82.9)
35.9
(96.6)
40.8
(105.4)
42.0
(107.6)
38.3
(100.9)
37.4
(99.3)
36.5
(97.7)
34.2
(93.6)
28.6
(83.5)
22.5
(72.5)
32.322
(90.173)
Daily mean °C (°F) 13.3
(55.9)
15.7
(60.3)
21.0
(69.8)
28.0
(82.4)
32.8
(91)
35.1
(95.2)
33.1
(91.6)
32.4
(90.3)
30.6
(87.1)
26.4
(79.5)
20.6
(69.1)
15.0
(59)
25.33
(77.6)
Average low °C (°F) 5.8
(42.4)
8.4
(47.1)
13.8
(56.8)
20.0
(68)
24.7
(76.5)
28.2
(82.8)
27.8
(82)
27.4
(81.3)
24.7
(76.5)
18.6
(65.5)
12.6
(54.7)
7.6
(45.7)
18.3
(64.94)
Record low °C (°F) 0.0
(32)
−1.0
(30.2)
3.9
(39)
12.6
(54.7)
14.4
(57.9)
18.3
(64.9)
16.1
(61)
21.4
(70.5)
13.1
(55.6)
11.0
(51.8)
4.0
(39.2)
1.7
(35.1)
−1
(30.2)
Precipitation mm (inches) 4.5
(0.177)
16.5
(0.65)
15.2
(0.598)
10.2
(0.402)
4.8
(0.189)
15.3
(0.602)
77.2
(3.039)
39.9
(1.571)
9.5
(0.374)
1.0
(0.039)
4.3
(0.169)
5.0
(0.197)
203.4
(8.007)
Mean monthly sunshine hours 222.4 218.9 250.8 274.3 269.1 213.9 218.3 256.6 279.3 284.0 260.8 223.5 2,971.9
Source: NOAA (1971–1990)[5]

Unrest[edit]

In June 2012, Pakistan's increasing electricity crisis caused violent riots across Punjab. According to protesters and community leaders load shedding was depriving communities of electricity 20–22 hours a day, causing businesses to go bust and making life difficult. On Sunday 17 June 2012, as many as 10 demonstrations took place across Bahawalnagar, in addition to those in other Punjabi cities, against those seen as responsible for the problems. Police had to interfere on Eidgah Road where rioters attempted to storm the house of parliamentarian Syed Mumtaz Alam Gillani.[6]

Notable people[edit]

For more about notable people and their achievements, see Category:People_from_Bahawalnagar_District and Category:Punjabi_poets.

[7]

References[edit]