Bahrain American Council

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Bahrain American Council
Type non-profit policy advocacy group
Registration no. 4115288
Location
  • 2300 M Street, NW, Suite 900, Washington, DC 20037
Key people Al Khalafalla
Website bactoday.org

The Bahrain American Council (BAC) was founded by a group of U.S. and Bahraini business leaders in March 2011 (after the start of the Bahraini uprising), hiring Policy Impact Communications, a public relations firm headed by William Nixon,[1] to incubate the organization. The Bahrain American Council and Policy Impact Communications share the same office space. The objective of the Bahrain American Council is to "promote trade and business relations between Bahrain and the United States" and to "educate the public about the strategic importance of Bahrain," home to the United States Fifth Fleet.

Today, the BAC operates out of offices located in Bahrain and Washington, DC. The chairman of the Bahrain American Council is Al Khalafalla, son of Bahrain superior court judge Omar Khalafalla. The BAC's vice chairman is former U.S. Ambassador to the Seychelles Richard Warner Carlson.[1][2][3] Other members of the board include John Eddy, a partner at public relations firm Southern Meridian[2][4]

The Bahrain American Council's executive director, Barton W. Marcois,[5] is a former vice president of Policy Impact Communications and a former Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy under George W. Bush.[3][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Elliott, Justin (2 April 2012). "Meet Bahrain’s Best Friend in Congress". ProPublica. 
  2. ^ a b "Contact Us". Bahrain American Council. Retrieved 17 July 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "People". About PIC. Policy Impact Communications. Retrieved 17 July 2012. 
  4. ^ "John Eddy". Our Team. Meridian Public Consulting and Public Affairs. Retrieved 17 July 2012. 
  5. ^ "About BAC". Bahrain American Council. Retrieved 1/08/2012.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  6. ^ "About BAC". Bahrain American Council. Retrieved 17 July 2012.