Bai Yun

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see Bai Yun (politician).
Bai Yun in 2008

Bai Yun (simplified Chinese: 白云; traditional Chinese: 白雲; meaning: "White Cloud") (born September 7, 1991) is a female giant panda sheltered at the San Diego Zoo. Bai Yun was the first successful birth of a giant panda at the Wolong Giant Panda Research Center in China.[1] She has been at the San Diego Zoo since September 10, 1996.[1] Bai Yun gave birth to her sixth cub in 2012 since arriving at the San Diego Zoo, considered the most surviving pandas born at a breeding facility outside the endangered species' native China.

History[edit]

Bai Yun's mother, Dong Dong, was caught in the wild and was at the Panyu Xiangjiang Wild Animal World in Guangzhou at the time of her death in 2011.[2][3] Bai Yun's father, Pan Pan, who is also the sire of Tian Tian, lives in Zunyi.

In the spring of 1999, Bai Yun was artificially inseminated with sperm from Shi Shi, the male panda at the zoo at that time. On August 21, 1999, Bai Yun gave birth to her first cub, Hua Mei, who is also the first giant panda born in the United States to survive to adulthood.

Bai Yun has since given birth to five other cubs, Mei Sheng (2003), Su Lin (2005), Zhen Zhen (2007), Yun Zi (2009), and Xiao Liwu (2012), all via natural mating. Bai Yun and these cubs' sire, Gao Gao, are considered the most reproductively successful panda parents in captivity.[4][5] With the birth of Xiao Liwu in 2012, Bai Yun became the second oldest panda on record to give birth. The oldest panda on record to give birth was two days older than Bai Yun at the time of birth of their respective cubs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Meet the Pandas". San Diego Zoo. 
  2. ^ "Dong Dong died". www.giantpanda.com. June 4, 2011. Retrieved June 13, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Farewell to Panda Dong Dong". San Diego Zoo. June 13, 2011. 
  4. ^ "San Diego's Panda 'Supercouple' Keeping Sparks Alive". FOXNews.com. November 23, 2007. 
  5. ^ "San Diego Zoo's giant panda couple enjoy mating success". Oakland Tribune. November 24, 2007. 

External links[edit]