Bailey's Marvel

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Display of Bailey's Marvel mango at the Redland Summer Fruit Festival, Fruit and Spice Park, Homestead, Florida.

The 'Bailey's Marvel' mango is a named, mid-season mango cultivar that originated in southwest Florida.

The tree believed to be the original Bailey's Marvel, located in Bokeelia, Florida.

History[edit]

Comparison of Bailey's Marvel (left) with Ataulfo (right)

The original tree was grown on Pine Island, Florida and grew from a 'Haden' mango seed planted in the 1940s on the property of the Bailey brothers. A 2005 pedigree analysis estimated that 'Bailey's Marvel' was likely a cross between 'Haden' and 'Bombay'.[1] The variety did not become a major commercial cultivar but did become a popular dooryard variety.

'Bailey's Marvel' trees are planted in the collections of the USDA's germplasm repository in Miami, Florida,[2] the University of Florida's Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead, Florida,[3] and the Miami-Dade Fruit and Spice Park.[4] The original tree is still standing on Pine Island.

Description[edit]

The fruit is shaped very similar to its parent 'Haden' and has a similar flavor with fiberless flesh, averaging about a pound in weight and containing a monoembryonic seed. It ripens from July to mid-August in Florida, making it a mid-season cultivar there.[5]

The trees are moderately vigorous growers and have a reputation for being slightly more cold tolerant than other varieties.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cecile T. Olano; Raymond J. Schnell; Wilber E. Quintanilla and Richard J. Campbell (2005). "Pedigree analysis of Florida mango cultivars" (PDF) (118). Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. pp. 192–197. 
  2. ^ http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/acc/display.pl?1554801 USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Germplasm Resources Information Network - (GRIN). [Online Database] National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland.
  3. ^ http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/crane/pdfs/TREC-Fruit-Collections.pdf Page 2, #6
  4. ^ http://fruitandspicepark.org/friends/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=43&Itemid=29
  5. ^ http://www.virtualherbarium.org/tropicalfruit/mangotrees.html