Dog-baiting

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For other uses, see Bait (disambiguation).

Dog baiting is setting game dogs against a chained or confined animal for sport. The dogs bite and tear to subdue the opposing animal by incapacitating or killing it. Baiting is a blood sport used for entertainment and gambling. It is illegal in most countries with varying levels of enforcement.

History[edit]

During various periods of history and in different cultures around the world, various types of baiting, named for the species used, have been confirmed. These include badger-baiting, bear-baiting, bull-baiting, donkey-baiting, duck-baiting, hog-baiting, human-baiting, hyena-baiting, lion-baiting, monkey-baiting, rat-baiting, and wolf-baiting. Much of what is known about baiting comes from England in the Middle Ages, although it has not been legal there for some time. It is still practiced, however, in other parts of the world, including some cultures of Central Asia.

Laws[edit]

Canada[edit]

Baiting is illegal under section 445 of the criminal code in Canada.[1]

The USA[edit]

Baiting is generally illegal in the United States of America.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1][dead link]
  • Fleig, D. (1996). History of Fighting Dogs. T.F.H. Publications. ISBN 0-7938-0498-1
  • Homan, M. (2000). A Complete History of Fighting Dogs. Howell Book House Inc. ISBN 1-58245-128-1