Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers' International Union

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BCTGM
BCTGM logo.png
Full name Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers' International Union
Founded 1886
Members 100,000
Country United States, Canada
Affiliation AFL-CIO, CLC
Key people David B. Durkee, President; Steve Bertelli, Secretary-Treasurer
Office location Kensington, Maryland, United States
Website www.bctgm.org

The Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers' International Union (BCTGM) is a labor union in the United States and Canada with a membership of approximately 100,000. The union includes workers in bakeries, candy, cereal, sugar, grain mills, tobacco plants, food processing and manufacturing facilities and other related occupations related to these industries.

The union traces its history to the founding of the Journeymen Bakers Union in 1886. The contemporary BCTGM was formed in January, 1999 from the merger of the Bakery, Confectionery and Tobacco Workers' International Union and the American Federation of Grain Millers.

The BCTGM is affiliated with the AFL-CIO, the Canadian Labour Congress and the International Union of Foodworkers (IUF).

History[edit]

The predecessors of today's BCTGM include the Bakery and Confectionery Workers International Union of America. The B&C began as the Journeymen's Bakers Union, organized in 1886 in Pittsburgh, PA. In 1957, the American Bakery and Confectionery Workers International Union was formed. In 1969, the two organizations united under the B&C banner.

The Tobacco Workers International Union was founded in 1895. As it and the Bakery and Confectionery Workers International Union of America shared many common goals, both organizations merged in 1978, creating the Bakery, Confectionery and Tobacco Workers (BCT).

The American Federation of Grain Millers (AFGM) also has roots stemming back to the 1800s. In 1936, the National Council of Grain Processors was formed when a number of smaller grain milling unions agreed to unite as a national union under the banner of the American Federation of Labor, one of the early umbrella organizations for labor unions. In 1941, the council was renamed the American Federation of Grain Processors and in 1948 was reorganized as the AFGM. Shared goals and shared industries led to the January 1, 1999 merger between the BCT and AFGM, creating the modern BCTGM.

Because the predecessors of BCTGM organized workers in the U.S. and Canada, they included the word “International” in their name.

Strikes[edit]

On August 26, 2000, approximately 680 BCTGM workers began a strike against The Earthgrains Company (now a subsidiary of Bimbo Bakeries USA) at a plant in Fort Payne, Alabama. The strike was brought in part to protest mandatory overtime and few days off.[1] By August 31, 2000, the strike had spread to five other bakeries in Memphis and Chattanooga, Tennessee; Atlanta and Forest Park, Georgia; and Mobile, Alabama where worker contracts had expired. At this time, around 1,565 workers were involved.[2] By September 6, the strike had expanded to eight more plants. Around 2,700 workers were involved, a total of 12% of Earthgrains' workforce.[1] The strike eventually grew to a maximum of 27 bakeries before it was ended with the ratification of a new contract at Fort Payne on September 22.[3]

On November 9, 2012, the BCTGM went on strike at bakeries operated by Hostess Brands, to protest contract changes forced upon its members by a bankruptcy court. On November 16, 2012, after warning the union that it would be unable to continue operations unless employees returned to work, Hostess Brands, Inc., filed a motion to change its bankruptcy filing from one of reorganization to one of liquidation, shutting down the company. The liquidation resulted in the loss of 18,500 jobs.,[4] including approximately 6,500 BCTGM members.[5] After announcing the company's liquidation, Hostess Brands published a notice announcing that the business is unprofitable under its current cost structure, much of which is determined by union wages and pension costs, describing their offer to the BCTGM as having included wage, benefit and work rule concessions and giving Hostess Brands’ 12 unions a 25 percent ownership stake in the company, representation on its Board of Directors and $100 million in reorganized Hostess Brands’ debt.[6] The Teamsters Union had reached a deal with the Hostess, but BCTGM, representing bakery workers, refused to agree to concessions. Teamster officials were quoted as saying that the BCTGM had chosen "to not substantively look for a solution or engage in the process".[7] BCTGM President Frank Hurt issued a statement claiming that Hostess failed because its six management teams over the last eight years were unable to make it a profitable, successful business enterprise, and that despite a commitment from the company after an earlier bankruptcy that the resources derived from the workers’ concessions would be plowed back into the company, this never materialized.[8] BCTGM President Hurt resigned from his position 6 weeks later effective 1 January 2013.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Earthgrains Says More Workers Join Sympathy Strike". New York Times 8/6/2000. Retrieved December 13, 2007. 
  2. ^ "Earthgrains Strike in Southern States Expands". New York Times 7/31/00. Retrieved December 13, 2007. 
  3. ^ "Earthgrains Quarterly Report". Securities & Exchange Commission 9/12/00. Retrieved December 13, 2007. 
  4. ^ "Twinkies Maker Hostess to Liquidate Company After Strike". ABC News. Retrieved November 16, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Teamsters approve 'last, best offer' from Hostess Brands". Dallas Business Journal, September 17, 2012. Retrieved November 16, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Hostess Brands to Wind Down Company After BCTGM Union Strike Cripples Operations" (Press release). Hostess Brands. November 16, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Hostess to close, lay off 18,500 after 'crippling' union fight". Fox news. November 16, 2012. 
  8. ^ "BCTGM President Frank Hurt: Hostess Demise a Decade in the Making" (Press release). AFL-CIO. November 16, 2012. 
  9. ^ http://www.bctgm.org/about-us/international-officers/david-b-durkee/

External links[edit]

External references[edit]

  • Stuart B. Kaufman. Challenge & Change: The History of the Tobacco Workers International Union. University of Illinois Press. 1987. ISBN 0-252-01421-9.
  • Stuart B. Kaufman. A Vision of Unity: The History of the Bakery & Confectionery Workers International (Labor) Union. University of Illinois Press. 1987. ISBN 0-252-01423-5.