Balconet

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Balconet exterior
French balcony,
a.k.a. Balconet balcony / Juliet balcony
Balconet interior with 2 men's shoes

A balconet (or balconette) is an architectural term to describe a false balcony, or railing at the outer plane of a window-opening reaching to the floor, and having, when the window is open, the appearance of a balcony. They are common in France, Spain, and Italy.[1] They are often referred to as Juliet balconies[2] after the scene from Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet.

A prominent example of a balconette is on the Palazzo Labia in Venice.

Small steel or glass balconies have become increasingly common in the UK, as a decorative architectural feature that does not require official planning permission.[3]

Balconette brassieres[edit]

The term has also been applied to a style of brassiere featuring low-cut cups and wide set straps that give the appearance of a square neckline. The name "balconette" came from men in the balcony of a theatre looking down upon women. A balconette bra could not be seen from above.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Balconet". www.encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 23 March 2012. 
  2. ^ "Juliet balconies". Balconette. Retrieved 23 March 2012. 
  3. ^ "Juliet balcony". Juliet Balcony Centre. Retrieved 29 July 2012. 
  4. ^ "Bras glossary". www.glamorousamorous.com. Retrieved 23 March 2012.