Bald Mountain (Idaho)

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This article is about the Bald Mountain of the Sun Valley Resort in Blaine County, Idaho.
For the modest ski area in Clearwater County, see Bald Mountain Ski Area
.
Bald Mountain
Bald Mountain from Sun Valley Lake
Bald Mountain from Sun Valley Lake
Location Ketchum & Sun Valley
Blaine County, Idaho
 United States
Nearest city Twin Falls - 80 mi. (130 km)
Boise - 150 mi. (240 km)
Salt Lake - 330 mi. (530 km)
Coordinates 43°39′18″N 114°24′33″W / 43.65500°N 114.40917°W / 43.65500; -114.40917 (Bald Mountain)
Vertical 3400 ft - (1036 m)
Top elevation 9150 ft - (2789 m)
Base elevation 5750 ft - (1753 m)
River Run
Skiable area 2054 acres - (8.3 km²)
Runs 75
Ski trail rating symbol-green circle.svg - 36% easiest
Ski trail rating symbol-blue square.svg - 42% more difficult
Ski trail rating symbol-black diamond.svg - 22% most difficult
Lift system 14
- 1 gondola (8 person)
- 7 hi-speed quads
- 3 triples
- 2 doubles
- 1 surface
Snowfall 220 in. - (560 cm)
Snowmaking 645 acres - (2.6 km²)
Night skiing none
Website Sun Valley.com

Bald Mountain (9150 feet, 2789 m) is a mountain in south central Idaho, adjacent to the city of Ketchum in Blaine County. Baldy has one of the higher summits of the Smoky Mountains of Idaho, that are located in the Sawtooth National Forest. The forested Smoky Mountains were named for their propensity to summer forest fires.

BaldMountain is located in Idaho
BaldMountain

Bald
Mountain
location of Bald Mountain,
near Ketchum, Idaho

Sun Valley skiing[edit]

Bald Mountain in summer.

"Baldy" is the primary ski mountain of the Sun Valley ski resort, renowned for its lengthy runs of constant gradient, at varying levels of difficulty, with absence of wind.

In the Sun Valley's fourth year of operation (1939–40), Bald Mountain was opened for lift-served skiing with three single chairlifts, in a series, unloading at an elevation of 9020 feet (2749 m), just below the mountain summit.

With a base elevation of 5750 feet (1753 m) along the Big Wood River at River Run, Baldy's vertical drop is 3400 feet (1036 m) along its northeast face. It is served by 14 ski lifts (1 eight-person gondola, 7 high-speed quads, 3 triples, 2 doubles, 1 surface); Baldy has more uphill capacity per skier than any other ski area. It has 75 runs with 2054 acres (8.31 km²) of on-piste skiing, 645 acres (2.61 km²) of which have snowmaking. The slope ratings are 36% easiest, 42% more difficult, and 22% most difficult. These ratings are relative, not absolute; much of the "easiest" terrain on Bald Mountain would be rated as "intermediate" at most ski areas, as the beginner areas are on the gentler and smaller Dollar Mountain.

Sun Valley's Bald Mountain is independent of the Bald Mountain Ski Area, a modest ski hill near Pierce in Clearwater County in north central Idaho.

In media[edit]

In the NBC-TV miniseries, 10.5: Apocalypse, this mountain was believed to be an extinct volcano, until it erupted with devastating force. An avalanche of hot gases and ash cascaded down the mountain and buried everything, including the mountain's ski areas, and the towns of Sun Valley, Ketchum, and Hailey. Multiple rescue teams arrived at the scene and dug through the debris caused by Bald Mountain's eruption, looking for any survivors. Various anonymous internet film makers have tried to extend this episode. One plot contains a cosmic avalanche that completely wiped out the town of Ketchum and gave the dead "special powers". The plot was planned to then become a zombie apocalypse, however, due to lack of funding, was never completed.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 43°39′18″N 114°24′33″W / 43.65500°N 114.40917°W / 43.65500; -114.40917