Baldwin City, Kansas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Baldwin City, Kansas
City
Downtown Baldwin City
Downtown Baldwin City
Motto: "On the Santa Fe Trail"
Location of Baldwin City, Kansas
Location of Baldwin City, Kansas
Map of Baldwin City, Kansas
Map of Baldwin City, Kansas
Coordinates: 38°46′39″N 95°11′15″W / 38.77750°N 95.18750°W / 38.77750; -95.18750Coordinates: 38°46′39″N 95°11′15″W / 38.77750°N 95.18750°W / 38.77750; -95.18750
Country United States
State Kansas
County Douglas
Government
 • Type Mayor–Council
Area[1]
 • Total 2.64 sq mi (6.84 km2)
 • Land 2.62 sq mi (6.79 km2)
 • Water 0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation 1,037 ft (316 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 4,515
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 4,526
 • Density 1,723.3/sq mi (665.4/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 66006
Area code(s) 785
FIPS code 20-03900
GNIS feature ID 0479524[4]
Website City website
Aerial View of Baldwin City, Kansas

Baldwin City is a city in Douglas County, Kansas, United States about 12 miles (19 km) south of Lawrence and 15 miles (24 km) west of Gardner. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 4,515.[5] It is part of the Lawrence, Kansas Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city is home to Baker University, the oldest four-year university in the state.

History[edit]

The Old Castle Museum, the first building constructed for Baker University. To the right is a replica of Kibbee Cabin.

Early history[edit]

Baldwin City originally began as a trail stop on the Santa Fe Trail named Palmyra. The small town consisted of a harness shop, blacksmith, hotel, lawyer, drug store, two doctors and a tavern. In 1858, a group of Methodist ministers gathered at Kibbee Cabin and founded Baker University. The town of Palmyra bought land to the south for the university and surrounding city. A main benefactor was John Baldwin and the town was named in his honor.[6] Baldwin built a saw mill which was located at present-day Fifth and Indiana Streets.

The first post office in the town, then called Palmyra, was established in June, 1857.[7]

Baldwin City unwittingly found themselves surrounded by the events that led up to the American Civil War. Three miles east of Baldwin was the town site of Black Jack where the Battle of Black Jack took place on June 2, 1856. The night before John Brown stayed in Prairie City and Quantrill's raiders passed within three miles (5 km) of Baldwin after the burning of Lawrence in 1863.

Midland Railway[edit]

In 1867, the Leavenworth, Lawrence and Fort Gibson railroad laid tracks and became the first Kansas railroad south of the Kansas River. In 1906, the Santa Fe Depot was built and today the Midland Railway offers over 20-mile round trip excursion rides to Ottawa via "Nowhere" and Norwood. Midland's Scout program is one of the few in the country to offer a railroading merit badge and Midland has hosted a Thomas the Tank Engine attraction the last few years.[8]

Maple Leaf Festival[edit]

Every year since 1957, Baldwin City has hosted the Maple Leaf Festival during the third full weekend in October. It began as a way to celebrate a successful harvest and to view the fall foliage. Today, it is the largest fall family event in the area and features a parade, arts and crafts, quilt show, theatrical performances, history tours, train rides and live music. Annually it draws crowds of 30,000 or more.

Geography[edit]

Baldwin City is located at 38°46′39″N 95°11′15″W / 38.77750°N 95.18750°W / 38.77750; -95.18750 (38.777597, -95.187418)[9]. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.64 square miles (6.84 km2), of which, 2.62 square miles (6.79 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[1]

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Baldwin City has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[10]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 325
1890 935 187.7%
1900 1,017 8.8%
1910 1,386 36.3%
1920 1,137 −18.0%
1930 1,127 −0.9%
1940 1,096 −2.8%
1950 1,741 58.9%
1960 1,877 7.8%
1970 2,520 34.3%
1980 2,829 12.3%
1990 2,961 4.7%
2000 3,400 14.8%
2010 4,515 32.8%
Est. 2012 4,526 0.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]
2012 Estimate[12]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 4,515 people, 1,501 households, and 1,011 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,723.3 inhabitants per square mile (665.4 /km2). There were 1,665 housing units at an average density of 635.5 per square mile (245.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 93.4% White, 2.1% African American, 0.7% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 2.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.0% of the population.

There were 1,501 households of which 37.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.6% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 32.6% were non-families. 26.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.08.

The median age in the city was 30.2 years. 24.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 20.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.9% were from 25 to 44; 20.1% were from 45 to 64; and 11.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.5% male and 51.5% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 3,400 people, 1,077 households, and 774 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,565.1 people per square mile (605.0/km²). There were 1,165 housing units at an average density of 536.3 per square mile (207.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.62% White, 1.12% African American, 0.74% Native American, 0.62% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.38% from other races, and 3.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.62% of the population.

There were 1,077 households out of which 39.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.8% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.1% were non-families. 24.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the city the population was spread out with 25.3% under the age of 18, 21.8% from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 17.4% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28 years. For every 100 females there were 97.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $43,269, and the median income for a family was $51,667. Males had a median income of $37,111 versus $25,850 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,698. About 5.6% of families and 7.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.0% of those under age 18 and 5.7% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

The Baldwin City government consists of a mayor and five council members. The council meets the 1st and 3rd Monday of each month at 7:00pm.[13]

  • City Hall, 803 Eighth Street.

Education[edit]

Primary and secondary education[edit]

The USD 348 School District is located in Baldwin City and serves most of southern Douglas County. It currently maintains four schools in Baldwin City (Baldwin Elementary, Baldwin Intermediate, Baldwin Junior High and Baldwin High School). On December 13, 2010, the USD 348 Board of Education voted to close the schools maintained in Vinland and Worden at the end of the 2010-2011 school year.[14]

College[edit]

Baldwin City is home to the main campus of Baker University, a liberal arts university founded in 1858 by United Methodist ministers. It is the oldest four-year university in Kansas and has been coed since it was founded.

Notable people[edit]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • A Self-Guided Tour of Baldwin City's Historic Sites on the Santa Fe Trail by Loren K. Litteer
  • The Leavenworth, Lawrence & Ft. Gibson Railroad by Loren K. Litteer
  • The Story of the Marking of the Santa Fe Trail by the Daughters of the American Revolution in Kansas and the State of Kansas; Almira Cordry; Crane Co; 164 pages; 1915. (Online eBook)
  • History of the State of Kansas; William G. Cutler; A.T. Andreas Publisher; 1883. (Online HTML eBook)
  • Kansas : A Cyclopedia of State History, Embracing Events, Institutions, Industries, Counties, Cities, Towns, Prominent Persons, Etc.; 3 Volumes; Frank W. Blackmar; Standard Publishing Co; 944 / 955 / 824 pages; 1912. (Volume1 - Download 54MB PDF eBook),(Volume2 - Download 53MB PDF eBook), (Volume3 - Download 33MB PDF eBook)

External links[edit]

City
Schools
Newspaper
Historical
Maps