Balkans Cup

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This article is about the defunct regional football competition contested by club teams of Balkan countries. For the club version, see Balkans Cup. For the national teams version, see Balkan Cup. For the youth version, see Balkan Youth Championship.

The Balkans Cup was an international football competition for clubs from Albania, Bulgaria, Greece, Romania, Turkey, and Yugoslavia. It was introduced in 1961 and was contested a total of 28 times, though it never carried much importance in the countries concerned, in contrast to the (much older but also defunct) Balkan Cup (not Balkans) for national teams.

Editions[edit]

finals on home and away basis, except noted otherwise
a → first leg of the final
Year(s)
of edition
Nr of clubs
& format
Winner Results of finals
(or points in group format)
Finalist
(or runner-up in group format)
001993–9400
Details
4
type-I
Turkey Samsunspor Samsun 2–0, 3–0 a Greece PAS Giannina Ioannina
001992–9300
Details
6
type-G
Greece Edessaikos Edessa 3–1, 0–1 a Bulgaria Etar Veliko Tarnovo
001991–9200
Details
5
type-H
Turkey Sarıyer İstanbul 1–0, 0–0 a Romania Oţelul Galaţi
001990–9100
Details
6
type-G
Romania Inter Sibiu 1–0 (after extra time), 0–0 a Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Budućnost Podgorica
001989–9000 The Balkans Cup did not take place due to the Romanian Revolution of 198900[citation needed]
001988–8900
Details
6
type-C
Greece OFI Crete 3–1
one-off final in Serres, Greece
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Radnički Niš
001987–8800
Details
10
type-F
Bulgaria Slavia Sofia a 5–1, 1–0 Romania Argeş Piteşti
1986
Details
8
type-E
Bulgaria Slavia Sofia a 3–0, 2–3 Greece Panionios Smyrna (Athens)
001984–8500
Details
Greece Iraklis Thessaloniki 4–1, 1–3 a Romania Argeş Piteşti
001983–8400
Details
3
type-D
Bulgaria Beroe Stara Zagora contested in group: 6 – 4 points Romania Argeş Piteşti
001981–8300
Details
6
type-C
Bulgaria Beroe Stara Zagora a 3–0, 3–1 Albania 17 Nëntori Tirana
001980–8100
Details
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Velež Mostar 6–2, 6–5 a Bulgaria Trakia Plovdiv
001979–8000
Details
Romania Sportul Studențesc București a 2–0, 1–1 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia NK Rijeka
001977-7800
Details
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia NK Rijeka 4–1, 0–1 a Romania Jiul Petroşani
1977
Details
Greece Panathinaikos Athens 2–1, 0–0 a Bulgaria Slavia Sofia
1976
Details
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Dinamo Zagreb a 3–1, 2–3 Romania Sportul Studențesc București
1975
Details
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Radnički Niš a 1–0, 2–1 Turkey Eskişehirspor Eskişehir
1974
Details
Bulgaria Akademik Sofia a 2–1, 0–0 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Vardar Skopje
1973
Details
Bulgaria Lokomotiv Sofia 2–0, 1–1 a Romania ASA Târgu Mureş
1972
Details
Bulgaria Trakia Plovdiv a 5–0, 0–4 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Vardar Skopje
1971
Details
Greece Panionios Smyrna (Athens) a 2–1, 1–1 Albania Besa Kavajë
1970
Details
Albania Partizani Tirana 3–0, 1–1 a
2nd leg: Beroe did not show up
Bulgaria Beroe Stara Zagora
1969
Details
Bulgaria Beroe Stara Zagora 3–0, 0–1 a
2nd leg: Dinamo walked off while losing 0-1
Albania Dinamo Tirana
001967–6800
Details
8
type-B
Bulgaria Beroe Stara Zagora a 3–0, 3–4 Bulgaria Spartak Sofia
001966–6700
Details
Turkey Fenerbahçe İstanbul 1–0, 1–2a and 3–1
in play-off match in İstanbul,[1] Turkey
Greece AEK Athens
001964–6600
Details
Romania Rapid Bucureşti a 3–3, 2–0 Romania Farul Constanţa
001963–6400
Details
Romania Rapid Bucureşti 2–0, 1–1 a Bulgaria Spartak Plovdiv
001961–6300
Details
Greece Olympiacos Piraeus a 1–0, 0–1 and 1–0
in play-off match in İstanbul, Turkey
Bulgaria Levski Sofia
1961
Details
5
type-A
Romania Steagul Roşu Braşov contested in group: 13 – 8 points Bulgaria Levski Sofia
  • Competition's formats
type-A: one group of 5 clubs
type-B: two groups of 4, top clubs qualifying for the final
type-C: two groups of 3, top clubs qualifying for the final
type-D: one group of 3 clubs
type-E: knock-out (quarterfinals → semifinals → final)
type-F: two groups of 3 and one group of 4, top clubs plus the best runner-up qualifying for the knock-out semifinals
type-G: knock-out (preliminary round qualifying 2 clubs out of 4 → semifinals → final)
type-H: knock-out (preliminary round qualifying 1 club out of 2 → semifinals → final)
type-I: knock-out (semifinals → final)

Performances[edit]

By club[edit]

when sorted by year of winning or losing final(s), the table is sorted by the year of each club's first final
Club Win-
ners
Final
ists
Fin-
als
Year(s) of
winning
Year(s) of
losing
Entries Notes
Bulgaria Beroe Stara Zagora 4 1 0 4[2] 1968, 1969, 1983, 1984 1970 7 1984: top spot in group
Bulgaria Slavia Sofia 2 1 3 1986, 1988 1977 5
Romania Rapid Bucureşti 2 0 2 1964, 1966 0 2 winner in both entries
Greece Panionios Smyrna (Athens) 1 1 2 1971 1986 3
Bulgaria Trakia Plovdiv 1 1 2 1972 1981 2 reached final in both entries
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Radnički Niš 1 1 2 1975 1989 3
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia NK Rijeka 1 1 2 1978 1980 2 reached final in both entries
Romania Sportul Studențesc București 1 1 2 1980 1976 3
Greece Olympiacos Piraeus 1 0 1 1963 0 3
Turkey Fenerbahçe İstanbul 1 0 1 1967 0 4
Albania Partizani Tirana 1 0 1 1970 0 5
Bulgaria Lokomotiv Sofia 1 0 1 1973 0 4
Bulgaria Akademik Sofia 1 0 1 1974 0 2
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Dinamo Zagreb 1 0 1 1976 0 1
Greece Panathinaikos Athens 1 0 1 1977 0 1
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Velež Mostar 1 0 1 1981 0 1
Greece Iraklis Thessaloniki 1 0 1 1985 0 3
Greece OFI Crete 1 0 1 1989 0 2
Romania Inter Sibiu 1 0 1 1991 0 1
Turkey Sarıyer İstanbul 1 0 1 1992 0 1
Greece Edessaikos Edessa 1 0 1 1993 0 1
Turkey Samsunspor Samsun 1 0 1 1994 0 2
Romania Steagul Roşu Braşov 1 0 0 0[3] 1961 0 4 win: top spot in group
Romania Argeş Piteşti 0 3 0 2[2] 0 1984, 1985, 1988 3 1984: runner-up in group
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Vardar Skopje 0 2 2 0 1972, 1974 4
Bulgaria Levski Sofia 0 2 0 1[3] 0 1961, 1963 3 1961: runner-up in group
Bulgaria Spartak Plovdiv 0 1 1 0 1964 2
Romania Farul Constanţa 0 1 1 0 1966 4
Greece AEK Athens 0 1 1 0 1967 4
Bulgaria Spartak Sofia 0 1 1 0 1968 1
Albania Dinamo Tirana 0 1 1 0 1969 5
Albania Besa Kavajë 0 1 1 0 1971 2
Romania ASA Târgu Mureş 0 1 1 0 1973 2
Turkey Eskişehirspor Eskişehir 0 1 1 0 1975 3
Romania Jiul Petroşani 0 1 1 0 1978 1
Albania 17 Nëntori Tirana 0 1 1 0 1983 4
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Budućnost Podgorica 0 1 1 0 1991 2
Romania Oţelul Galaţi 0 1 1 0 1992 1
Bulgaria Etar Veliko Tarnovo 0 1 1 0 1993 3
Greece PAS Giannina Ioannina 0 1 1 0 1994 2
Total 280 260 520 2 less finalists than winners, since 1961 (first) and 1983-84 editions were contested in group format

By country[edit]

clubs from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia competed as part of SFR Yugoslavia
Country 00Win-
00ners
0Final
0ists
Finals Club(s) won in final(s) Club(s) did not win in final(s)
Bulgaria Bulgaria 9 0 7[3] 0 15[4] Beroe Stara Zagora (4)0
Slavia Sofia (2)0
Trakia Plovdiv (1),
Lokomotiv Sofia (1),
Akademik Sofia (1)
Levski Sofia (1, plus runner-up spot in 1961)0
Spartak Plovdiv (1), Spartak Sofia (1),
Beroe Stara Zagora (1),
Slavia Sofia (1), Trakia Plovdiv (1),
Etar Veliko Tarnovo (1)
Greece Greece 6 3 09 Olympiacos Piraeus (1),
Panionios Smyrna (Athens) (1),
Panathinaikos Athens (1),
Iraklis Thessaloniki (1),
OFI Crete (1),
Edessaikos Edessa (1)
AEK Athens (1),
Panionios Smyrna (Athens) (1),
PAS Giannina Ioannina (1)
Romania Romania 5 0 7[2] 0 11[4] Rapid Bucureşti (2)0
Steagul Roşu Braşov (1),
Sportul Studențesc Bucureşti (1),
Inter Sibiu (1)
Argeş Piteşti (2, plus runner-up spot in 1983-84) -
Farul Constanţa (1), ASA Târgu Mureş (1),
Sportul Studențesc Bucureşti (1),
Jiul Petroşani (1), Oţelul Galaţi (1)
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Yugoslavia 4 5 09
Dinamo Zagreb (1), NK Rijeka (1)
Radnički Niš (1)
Velež Mostar (1)
___
___

NK Rijeka (1)
Radnički Niš (1)
——
Vardar Skopje (2)
Budućnost Podgorica (1)
2 1 3
1 1 2
1 - 1
- 2 2
- 1 1
Turkey Turkey 3 1 04 Fenerbahçe İstanbul (1),
Sarıyer İstanbul (1),
Samsunspor Samsun (1)
Eskişehirspor Eskişehir (1)
Albania Albania 1 3 04 Partizani Tirana (1) Dinamo Tirana (1), Besa Kavajë (1),
17 Nëntori Tirana (1)
Total 280 260 52 2 less finalists than winners, since 1961 (first) and 1983-84 editions were contested in group format

Top performer by country:

Country Club 0Winners Finalists 0Finals Entries Notes
Bulgaria BUL Beroe Stara Zagora 4 1 0 4[2] 7 Balkans Cup record holder in
wins, finals reached and entries
Romania ROU Rapid Bucureşti 2 - 2 2
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia YUG NK Rijeka 1 1 2 2 Radnički Niš (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia YUG):
same performance in 3 entries
Greece GRE Panionios Smyrna (Athens) 1 1 2 3
Turkey TUR Sarıyer İstanbul 1 - 1 1 Samsunspor and Fenerbahçe:
1 win in 2 and 4 entries respectively
Albania ALB Partizani Tirana 1 - 1 5

Participation[edit]

By club[edit]

In the 33 years of its existence, a total of 89 clubs from 6 countries appeared in the 28 Balkans Cup editions. Two of them, both Turkish, withdrawn their participation before playing a single match: Zonguldakspor in 1980-81 and Trabzonspor in 1986. Sides with 4 entries or more:

Club Country Entries Win-
ners
Final
ists
Fin-
0als0
First
edition
Last
edition
Notes
Beroe Stara Zagora Bulgaria BUL 7 4 1 0 4[2] 1967-68 1992-93
Slavia Sofia Bulgaria BUL 5 2 1 3 1977 1987-88
Partizani Albania ALB 5 1 - 1 1961 1979-80
Dinamo Tirana Albania ALB 5 - 1 1 1961-63 1987-88
Galatasaray Turkey TUR 5 - - - 1961-63 1990-91 also withdrew in 1977-78 and 1979–80
Steagul Roşu Braşov Romania ROU 4 1 - 0 -[3] 1961 1972
Fenerbahçe İstanbul Turkey TUR 4 1 - 1 1961 1967-68 also withdrew in 1963-64
Lokomotiv Sofia Bulgaria BUL 4 1 - 1 1966-67 1988-89
Vardar Skopje Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia YUG 4 - 2 2 1964-66 1974
Farul Constanţa Romania ROU 4 - 1 1 1964-66 1975
AEK Athens Greece GRE 4 - 1 1 1961 1980-81
17 Nëntori Tirana Albania ALB 4 - 1 1 1964-66 1990-91

By country[edit]

Bulgarian and Turkish sides were present at each one of the 28 Balkans Cup editions, while Yugoslavian were absent 9 times in total, entering just twice during its last decade of existence (ironically, reaching both finals). Generally, South Slavs (both Football Association and clubs) were never keen supporters of the competition, as they had neither been enthusiastic about the national teams' Balkan Cup, too.

00Bulgaria00 Turkey 0Romania0 00Greece00 Albania Yugoslavia
000Number of different sides that entered 15 17 18 15 12 12
000Editions of Balkans Cup that
[1] country was represented by at least one club 28 28 27 27 26 20
[2] country's club withdrew before playing a match 0- 05 0- 01 0- 01
[3] country was still represented by another club 0- 01 0- 01 0- 0-
[4] country's clubs competed (=[1]-[2]+[3]) 28 24 27 27 26 19
000country's clubs were absent (=28 total editions-[4]) 0- 04 01 01 02 09
000Years/editions that country's clubs were absent 1977 to 1981
1986
1993-94
(last Cup)
1983-84 1983 to 1985 1961 (first Cup)
1983 to 1988
1991-end
[5] Editions a club quit after playing at least one match 01 05 01 04 0- 01
000Editions a club withdrew or quit (=[2]+[5]) 01 10 01 05 0- 02
[6] Editions with double entry 08 05 06 03 01 0-
[7] Total entries (=[4]-[3]+[6]) 36 28 33 29 27 19
[8] Cups won 09 03 05 06 01 04
000% success in winning the Cup (=[8]÷[7]×100) 25% 11% 15% 21% 04% 21%
[9] Finals reached 0 15 [4] 04 0 11 [4] 09 04 09
000% success in reaching the final (=[9]÷[7]×100) 42% 14% 33% 31% 15% 47%

Despite the fact that in each edition there was at least one Turkish side initially entering, in no less than 5 occasions it withdrew before playing a single match and in 5 more quit during group stage, after unsuccessful results. Greeks followed with 1 withdrawal and 4 quits, while clubs from all countries had sporadically terminated their participation in some early stage of the competition, except for Albanian. Multiple winner and several other records holder Beroe Stara Zagora, became the only Bulgarian side ever to withdraw or quit a Balkans Cup match and the single one to do so in a final, by not showing up for 1970 edition's return leg against Partizani Tirana of Albania, following an 1-1 draw at home.

References[edit]

  1. ^ draw for the venue was held by FIFA President Sir Stanley Rous
  2. ^ a b c d e 1983-84 edition not included, since contested in group format
  3. ^ a b c d 1961 edition (first) not included, since contested in group format
  4. ^ a b c d 1961 (first) and 1983-84 editions not included, since contested in group format

Sources[edit]