Bankova Street

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Vulytsia Bankova
Вулиця Банкова (Ukrainian)
Square in front of House with Chimaeras.JPG
The Presidential Administration (left) and the House with Chimaeras official residence (right).
Former name(s) Tsaredarska, Trepovska, Komunistychna, Ordzhonikidze
Length 450 m (1,480 ft)
Addresses 2 (Liebermann's mansion)
9-11 (President's Administration)
10 House with Chimaeras
Location Central Kiev, Ukraine

Bankova Street (Ukrainian: вулиця Банкова, vulytsia Bankova) is a street in central Kiev (Kyiv), the capital of Ukraine, located in the Lypky neighborhood of the Pechersk District. Most of the street is pedestrianised and closed-off, as it houses the Presidential Administration of Ukraine and various official residences, notably the House with Chimaeras.

Bankova Street was first constructed during the 1870s on the estate of Governor-General F. Trepov. During its history, the street was named Tsaredarska, Trepovska (in honor of G.G. Trepov), Bankova, Komynistychna (from 1919-1938), and Ordzhonikidze (1938-1992). During the WWII was named as Bismark Strasse. The street was renamed once again to its historic name, "Bankova," in 1992. The present name comes from the 1840 building of the Kiev Office of the State Bank, hence "Bank Street". Today the bank is located at 7 Instytutska Street.

The street runs between Instytutska Street and Lyuteranska Street. At No.2 was the mansion of the sugar magnate Simkha Liebermann, now is the headquarters of the Ukrainian Writers' Union, originally built in 1879 and redesigned for Liebermann in 1898 by the architect Vladimir Nikolayev. [1] At No's 9 and 11 there is located the Presidential Administration of Ukraine and No.10 is the House with Chimaeras.

From 1905 to around 1946, a tram line (at various times No.7 and 18, respectively) ran through the street, connecting the Bessarabska Square near Khreshchatyk and Hrushevsky Street.

Architectural monuments[edit]

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Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Savchuk (1996), p. 99