Banswara State

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Banswara State
बाँसवाड़ा
Princely State of British India
1497–1949
History
 -  Established 1497
 -  Independence of India 1949
Area
 -  1901 4,160 km2 (1,606 sq mi)
Population
 -  1901 165,350 
Density 39.7 /km2  (102.9 /sq mi)
Public Domain This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. 

Banswara State was a princely state in India during the British Raj. It was located in what is today the state of Rajasthan. The rulers were of Sisodia clan.

History[edit]

Banswara state was founded in 1527. Banswara was established by Udai Singh, the ruler of Bagar as a domain for his son Jagmal Singh.

In 1913 a section of Adivasi Bhils revolted under the headship of a social reformer Govindgiri and Punja which was suppressed in November, 1913. Hundreds of Bhils were shot dead at the Mangarh hillock where they were holding a peaceful meeting. The place has become sacred and is better known as the Mangarh Dham. In 1949 Banswara was merged into the Indian Union.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Coordinates: 23°33′N 74°27′E / 23.55°N 74.45°E / 23.55; 74.45