Barbie and The Sensations: Rockin' Back to Earth

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Barbie and the Sensations: Rockin Back To Earth
Barbie and the Sensations Poster.jpg
Movie Poster.
Produced by Eric S. Rollman
Andy Heyward
Written by Bill Dubay
Martha Moran
Ruth Handler
Starring Sharon Lewis as Barbie
Music by Haim Saban
Shuki Levy
Distributed by Hi-Tops Video (VHS)
Release dates 1987[1]
Running time 30 min.[2]
Country United States
Language English

Barbie and The Sensations: Rockin' Back to Earth is the title of the second adventure of Barbie and her rock band "The Rockers" (or "The Sensations"). It is the sequel of Barbie and the Rockers: Out of this World. The two specials were released together on video by Hi-Tops Video.

Plot[edit]

After the first great concert for peace in space, Barbie and her band The Rockers are going to come back home. During the trip back to earth, on the space shuttle, they start to play a song ("Rockin Back"), few seconds later a "time warp" tunnel is forming in front of the Shuttle. Then they see there are a lot of clocks going backward inside the tunnel, at the end of that, the Shuttle lands on a strange airport. After the landing they meet Dr. Merrishaw (probably an astronomer engineer) and his daughter Kim, and learn they are in the year 1959, and then brings them around the city to have a look change. At the end, after a performance at Cape Canaveral, Dr. Merrishaw helps Barbie and the Rockers return to their time. Back in the present, they have a big concert, where Barbie is reunited with an adult Kim and introduced to her daughter Megan.

Songs[edit]

  • Rockin Back
  • Dressin Up
  • Do you wanna dance? (Bobby Freeman cover)
  • Here comes my baby (Cat Stevens cover)
  • Blue Jean Boy
  • Everybody Rocks
  • Ending Titles - Barbie and The Rockers Theme Instrumental

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Barbie and the Sensations: Rockin' Back to Earth : Synopsis". msn. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  2. ^ "Barbie and the Sensations: Rockin' Back to Earth (1987)". The New York Times. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 

External links[edit]