Barend Biesheuvel

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Barend Biesheuvel
Barend Biesheuvel 1971.jpg
44th Prime Minister of the Netherlands
In office
July 6, 1971 – May 11, 1973
Monarch Juliana
Deputy Roelof Nelissen
Molly Geertsema
Preceded by Piet de Jong
Succeeded by Joop den Uyl
Member of the House of Representatives
In office
December 7, 1972 – March 7, 1973
Parliamentary leader of the Anti Revolutionary Party in the House of Representatives
In office
November 30, 1972 – March 7, 1973
Preceded by Wim Aantjes
Succeeded by Wim Aantjes
Party leader of the Anti Revolutionary Party
In office
July 1, 1963 – March 7, 1973
Preceded by Sieuwert Bruins Slot
Succeeded by Wim Aantjes
Member of the House of Representatives
In office
February 23, 1967 – July 6, 1971
Parliamentary leader of the Anti Revolutionary Party in the House of Representatives
In office
February 16, 1967 – July 6, 1971
Preceded by Bauke Roolvink
Succeeded by Wim Aantjes
Deputy Prime Minister of the Netherlands
In office
July 24, 1963 – April 5, 1967
Serving with Anne Vondeling (1965-1966)
Jan de Quay (1966-1967)
Prime Minister Victor Marijnen (1963-1965)
Jo Cals (1965-1966)
Jelle Zijlstra (1966-1967)
Preceded by Henk Korthals
Succeeded by Johan Witteveen
Joop Bakker
Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries
In office
July 24, 1963 – April 5, 1967
Prime Minister Victor Marijnen (1963-1965)
Jo Cals (1965-1966)
Jelle Zijlstra (1966-1967)
Preceded by Victor Marijnen
Succeeded by Pierre Lardinois
Minister for Suriname and Netherlands Antilles Affairs
In office
July 24, 1963 – April 5, 1967
Prime Minister Victor Marijnen (1963-1965)
Jo Cals (1965-1966)
Jelle Zijlstra (1966-1967)
Preceded by Henk Korthals
Succeeded by Joop Bakker
Member of the European Parliament
for the Netherlands
In office
March 7, 1961 – July 24, 1963
Member of the House of Representatives
In office
November 6, 1956 – July 24, 1963
Personal details
Born Barend Willem Biesheuvel
(1920-04-05)April 5, 1920
Haarlemmerliede, Netherlands
Died April 29, 2001(2001-04-29) (aged 81)
Haarlem, Netherlands
Nationality Dutch
Political party Christian Democratic Appeal
(from 1980)
Other political
affiliations
Anti Revolutionary Party
(until 1980)
Spouse(s) Mies Meuring
(m. 1945-1989; her death)
Children 2 daughters and 1 son
Alma mater Vrije Universiteit (Master of Laws)
Occupation Politician
Civil servant
Trade Union Leader
Corporate director
Religion Reformed Churches in the Netherlands
Nickname(s) Handsome Barend

Barend Willem Biesheuvel (April 5, 1920 – April 29, 2001) was a Dutch politician of the defunct Anti Revolutionary Party (ARP) now merged into the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA). He served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from July 6, 1971 until May 11, 1973.[1][2]

A Civil servant and Trade Union Leader by occupation, he was General Secretary of the Christian Farmers and Gardeners Association of the Netherlands (CBTB) from 1952 until 1959 and Chairman 1959 until 1963. Biesheuvel became a Member of the House of Representatives on November 6, 1956 after the Dutch general election of 1956. On March 7, 1961 he was selected as a Member of the European Parliament and dual served in those positions until July 24, 1963. Biesheuvel became the lijsttrekker (top candidate) of the Anti Revolutionary Party for the Dutch general election of 1963 and served as Party leader from July 1, 1963 until March 7, 1973. The Anti Revolutionary Party lost one seat but the following cabinet formation resulted in a coalition agreement which formed the Cabinet Marijnen, Biesheuvel became Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Suriname and Netherlands Antilles Affairs. On February 28, 1965 the Cabinet Marijnen fell and was replaced by the Cabinet Cals, Biesheuvel remained as Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Suriname and Netherlands Antilles Affairs but served alongside Anne Vondeling as Deputy Prime Minister. On October 14, 1966 the Cabinet Cals also fell and a rump Cabinet Zijlstra was formed on November 22, 1966 Biesheuvel again remained as Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Suriname and Netherlands Antilles Affairs and this time served alongside former Prime Minister Jan de Quay as Deputy Prime Minister. For the Dutch general election of 1967 Biesheuvel again as lijsttrekker won two seats, primarily due to the popularity of Prime Minister Jelle Zijlstra. However Zijlstra announced he didn't wanted the serve a full term as Prime Minister and endorsed his Party leader Biesheuvel. The following cabinet formation failed to result in a coalition agreement to form a Cabinet Biesheuvel, and after a new cabinet formation the Cabinet De Jong was formed. Biesheuvel became the Parliamentary leader of the Anti Revolutionary Party in the House of Representatives on February 16, 1967 and returned to the House of Representatives on February 23, 1967.

The Cabinet De Jong served a complete full term and for the Dutch general election of 1971 Biesheuvel again as lijsttrekker lost two seats, but the following cabinet formation resulted in a coalition agreement to form the Cabinet Biesheuvel I. Biesheuvel became Prime Minister of the Netherlands and Minister of General Affairs. On July 19, 1972 the Cabinet Biesheuvel I fell and a rump Cabinet Biesheuvel II was formed on August 9, 1972. For the Dutch general election of 1972 Biesheuvel again as lijsttrekker won one seat and Biesheuvel again became the Parliamentary leader of the Anti Revolutionary Party in the House of Representatives on November 30, 1972 and returned to the House of Representatives on December 7, 1972. But the following slow cabinet formation resulted in a coalition agreement which formed the Cabinet Den Uyl and Biesheuvel announced his retirement from politics and stood down as Party leader of the Anti Revolutionary Party and resigned as Parliamentary leader of the Anti Revolutionary Party in the House of Representatives and as a Member of the House of Representatives on March 7, 1973. Biesheuvel remained as Prime Minister until the Cabinet Den Uyl was installed on May 11, 1973.

After his premiership, Biesheuvel retired from active politics at the age of fifty-three and occupied numerous seats on supervisory boards in the business and industry world (KLM, NIBC Bank, CSM N.V., AVEBE) and led several governmental commissions.[3][4]

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Barend Willem Biesheuvel was born on April 5, 1920 in Haarlemmerliede in the Netherlands Province of North Holland in a Reformed family, the son of Arie Biesheuvel (born January 21, 1883 in Haarlemmerliede) and Johanna Margaretha "Antje" Troost (born in February 22, 1881 in Sloten). Biesheuvel had three brothers and two sisters. After completing his secondary education at local schools, he graduated in law at the Free University of Amsterdam in September 1945. For the next two years Biesheuvel worked in Alkmaar as secretary to the Food Commissioner for the Province of North Holland. In 1947 he became secretary to the Foreign Division of the Agricultural Society (now the Agricultural Board). In 1952 Mr Biesheuvel became general secretary of the Christian Farmers and Gardeners Association of the Netherlands (CBTB) and in 1959 chairman of that organisation. From the same year he was also a member of the Agricultural Board, the Labour Foundation and the boards of the Centrale Raifeissen Bank and Heidemij.

Politics[edit]

Barend Biesheuvel at the inauguration of his First cabinet in 1971.

Between 1956 and 1963 he represented the Anti Revolutionary Party in the House of Representatives (the lower house of parliament). From 1957 to 1961 he held a seat on the Consultative Assembly of the Council of Europe and from 1961 to 1963 in the European Parliament.

In the successive administrations headed by Marijnen, Cals and Zijlstra between 24 July 1963 and 5 April 1967 he was Deputy Prime Minister with additional responsibility for matters concerning Suriname and the Netherlands Antilles, and Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries.

In 1967 he returned to the House of Representatives and became leader of the parliamentary Anti Revolutionary Party. During the same period he also chaired the Shipbuilding Board and the Committee on Government Information Reform.

After Politics[edit]

Following his political career, Biesheuvel went on to occupy many other positions in the public and private sectors. Among other things, he was chairman of the supervisory board of the National Investment Bank, a member of the supervisory boards of OGEM and KLM, and chaired the working party on the Netherlands Antilles, the national advisory committee on the relationship between the electorate and policy-making, the Provisional Council for Transport, Public Works and Water Management and the Interministerial Coordinating Committee on North Sea Affairs (ICONA).

Personal[edit]

On November 22, 1945 Biesheuvel married his longtime girlfriend Wilhelmina Jacoba "Mies" Meuring (born August 7, 1919). They had two daughters and one son. Mies Meuring died on January 17, 1989 at the age of sixty-nine. Barend Biesheuvel died in a hospital in Haarlem after a long illness on April 29, 2001 at the age of eighty-one. Biesheuvel and his wife were buried at the main cemetery in Bloemendaal.[5][6]

Decorations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ (Dutch) Biesheuvel, Barend Willem (1920-2001), Historici.nl, February 10, 2012
  2. ^ (Dutch) Mr. B. W. (Barend) Biesheuvel 6 juli 1971 – 11 mei 1973, Geschiedenis24.nl, December 9, 2005
  3. ^ (Dutch) Mooie Barend. De vergeten premier, Volkskrant, June 9, 2012
  4. ^ (Dutch) De driftbuien van Mooie Barend, Historischnieuwsblad.nl, May 6, 2001
  5. ^ (Dutch) Barend Biesheuvel overleden, Trouw, May 1, 2001
  6. ^ (Dutch) Barend Biesheuvel (81) overleden, Volkskrant, May 1, 2001

External links[edit]

Party political offices
Preceded by
Sieuwert Bruins Slot
Party leader of the Anti Revolutionary Party
1963-1973
Succeeded by
Wim Aantjes
Preceded by
Bauke Roolvink
Parliamentary leader of the Anti Revolutionary Party
in the House of Representatives

1967-1971
Succeeded by
Wim Aantjes
Preceded by
Wim Aantjes
Parliamentary leader of the Anti Revolutionary Party
in the House of Representatives

1972-1973
Succeeded by
Wim Aantjes
Government offices
Preceded by
Henk Korthals
Minister for Suriname and Netherlands Antilles Affairs
1963-1967
Succeeded by
Joop Bakker
Preceded by
Victor Marijnen
Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries
1963-1967
Succeeded by
Pierre Lardinois
Preceded by
Piet de Jong
Minister of General Affairs
1971-1973
Succeeded by
Joop den Uyl
Political offices
Preceded by
Henk Korthals
Deputy Prime Minister of the Netherlands
1963-1967
With: Anne Vondeling (1965-1966)
Jan de Quay (1966-1967)
Succeeded by
Johan Witteveen
Joop Bakker
Preceded by
Piet de Jong
Prime Minister of the Netherlands
1971-1973
Succeeded by
Joop den Uyl
Business positions
Preceded by
Unknown
Chairman of the NIBC Bank
1973-1991
Succeeded by
Unknown