Barium azide

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Barium azide
Identifiers
CAS number 18810-58-7 YesY
PubChem 62728
ChemSpider 56472 YesY
EC number 242-594-6
UN number 1687
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula BaN6
Molar mass 221.37 g/mol
Appearance white crystalline solid
Odor odorless
Density 2.936 g/cm[1]
Melting point 126 °C
Boiling point 160°C(initial decomposition),[2] >217°C (deflagrates)
180°C(initial decomposition),[3] 225°C explosion
Solubility in water 11.5 g/100 mL (0°C)
14.98 g/100mL (15.7°C)
15.36 g/100mL (20°C)
22.73 g/100mL (52.1°C)
24.75 g/100mL (70°C)[4]
Solubility in alcohol 0.017 g/100 mL[5] (16°C)
Solubility in acetone insoluble
Solubility in ether insoluble
Hazards
MSDS [1]
EU classification Highly toxic (T+)
Dangerous for the environment (N)
R-phrases R1, R23, R25, R36, R37, R38
LD50 mg/kg (oral, rats/mice)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
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Infobox references

Barium azide Ba(N3)2 is an inorganic azide, is explosive, but less sensitive to mechanical shock than lead azide.

Uses[edit]

Can be used to make azides of magnesium (but its hydrolytic tendency frustrated efforts to isolate it), sodium, potassium, lithium, rubidium and zinc with their respective sulfates.[4]

Ba(N3)2 + Li2SO4 → 2 LiN3 + BaSO4

It can also be used in the preparation of extra pure nitrogen on heating:

Ba(N3)2 → Ba + 3 N2

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fedoroff, Basil T.; Aaronson, Henry A.; Reese, Earl F.; Sheffield, Oliver E.; Clift, George D. (1960). Encyclopedia of Explosives and Related Items (Vol. 1). US Army Research and Development Command TACOM, ARDEC. 
  2. ^ Tiede, E. (1916). "Die Zersetzung der Alkali- und Erdalkali-azide im Hochvakuum zur Reindarstellung von Stickstoff". Ber. Dtsch. Chem. Ges. 49: p. 1742–1745. doi:10.1002/cber.19160490234. 
  3. ^ Audrieth, L. F. (1934). "Hydrazoic Acid and Its Inorganic Derivatives". Chem. Rev. 15: p. 169–224. doi:10.1021/cr60051a002. 
  4. ^ a b H. D. Fair and R. F. Walker (1977). Energetic Materials, Vol. 1. Physics and Chemistry of the Inorganic Azides. New York and London: Plenum Press. doi:10.1002/prac.19770811124. 
  5. ^ Curtius, T.; Rissom, J. (1898). "Neue Untersuchungen über den Stickstoffwasserstoff N3H". J. Prakt. Chem. 58: p. 261–309. doi:10.1002/prac.18980580113.