Cork (barony)

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Not to be confused with Barony of Cork City or Earl of Cork.

Cork (Irish: Corcaigh[l 1]) is a barony in County Cork, Ireland, surrounding the city of Cork.[l 1] The barony comprises the former Liberties of Cork, the area which was within the county of the city of Cork but outside the municipal borough of Cork.[1] The liberties were defined by the charter granted in 1608 by Charles I of England as extending three miles in all directions from the city walls.[2] Under the Municipal Corporations Act (Ireland) 1840, the liberties were detached from the county of the city, and attached to the county of Cork as a new barony.[1]

The Barony of Cork City comprises the former area of the municipal borough. No modifications to barony boundaries have been made since the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898. The boundary of the city (previously county borough) of Cork has been extended since 1898 beyond the barony of Cork City and now includes parts of the barony of Cork.

Legal context[edit]

Baronies were created after the Norman invasion of Ireland as divisions of counties and were used the administration of justice and the raising of revenue. While baronies continue to be officially defined units, they have been administratively obsolete since 1898. However, they continue to be used in land registration and in specification, such as in planning permissions. In many cases, a barony corresponds to an earlier Gaelic túath which had submitted to the Crown.

Location[edit]

The barony, doughnut-like, entirely surrounds another barony, that of the Barony of Cork City. Outside the barony of Cork lie the neighbouring baronies of Barrymore to the east, Barretts to the north-west, Muskerry East to the west, and Kerrycurrihy to the south.[3] The River Lee bisects the barony from west to east.[3]

Subdivisions[edit]

The barony of Cork comprises part or all of 16 civil parishes:[l 2]

Parish Irish name Location within barony of Cork Other baronies in parish Notes References
Rathcooney Ráth Chuanna North-east None [l 3]
St. Michael's Paróiste Mhichíl North Barrymore Only the townland of Ballinvriskig is in the barony of Cork. [l 4]
Dunbulloge Dún Bolg North Barrymore Only the townland of Ballyhesty is in the barony of Cork. [l 5]
Kilcully Cill Chúile North None [l 6]
St. Anne's, Shandon Paróiste San Anna North, inner Cork City See Church of St Anne [l 7]
St. Mary's, Shandon Paróiste Mhuire North-west, inner Cork City [l 8]
Whitechurch An Teampall Geal North-west Barrymore, Barretts [l 9]
Currykippane Currach Cheapáin West, north of the River Lee None [l 10]
Carrigrohane Carraig Ruacháin West, south of the River Lee Muskerry East [l 11]
St. Finbar's Paróiste Fhionnbharra South Cork City Cathedral parish; see Saint Finbarre's Cathedral [l 12][1]
Kilnaglory Cill na Gluaire South-west Muskerry East Only the townland of Ballynora is in the barony of Cork. [l 13]
St. Nicholas Paróiste San Nioclás South, inner Cork City, Muskerry East Only the detached townland of Maglin is in Muskerry East. [l 14]
Inishkenny Inis Cionaoith South Muskerry East [l 15]
Ballinaboy Baile na Baoi South Muskerry East, Kerrycurrihy, Kinalea [l 16]
Killanully Cill an Eallaigh South Cork City, Kerrycurrihy [l 17]
Carrigaline Carraig Uí Leighin South-east Muskerry East, Kerrycurrihy, Kinalea [l 18]

References[edit]

From "Irish placenames database". logainm.ie (in English and Irish). Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs. Retrieved 11 November 2011. :

  1. ^ a b Cork
  2. ^ Cork: Civil parishes
  3. ^ Rathcooney
  4. ^ St. Michael's
  5. ^ Dunbulloge
  6. ^ Kilcully
  7. ^ St. Anne's, Shandon
  8. ^ St. Mary's, Shandon
  9. ^ Whitechurch
  10. ^ Currykippane
  11. ^ Carrigrohane
  12. ^ St. Finbar's
  13. ^ Kilnaglory
  14. ^ St. Nicholas
  15. ^ Inishkenny
  16. ^ Ballinaboy
  17. ^ Killanully
  18. ^ Carrigaline

From other sources:

  1. ^ a b c "Cork". The Parliamentary gazetteer of Ireland: adapted to the new poor-law, franchise, municipal and ecclesiastical arrangements, and compiled with a special reference to the lines of railroad and canal communication, as existing in 1814-45 I. A. Fullarton and co. 1846. pp. 515–516. 
  2. ^ "Charters". Cork City Council. Retrieved 20 November 2011. 
  3. ^ a b Joyce, P.W. (c. 1880). "County Cork". Philips' Handy Atlas of the Counties of Ireland. London: George Philips & Son. p. 7. 

External links[edit]