Barry Finegold

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Barry Finegold
Finegold announcement.jpg
Barry Finegold in May 2007, announcing his candidacy for U.S. Congress on the steps of Andover's Old Town Hall.
Member of the Massachusetts Senate
from the Second Essex and Middlesex district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 5, 2011
Preceded by Susan Tucker
Member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives
from the 17th Essex district
In office
January 1997 – January 5, 2011
Preceded by Gary Coon
Succeeded by Paul Adams
Personal details
Born March 3, 1971
Norwood, Massachusetts
Nationality American
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Amy Finegold
Residence Andover, Massachusetts
Alma mater Franklin & Marshall College
Massachusetts School of Law
Harvard University
Profession Attorney
Religion Jewish

Barry R. Finegold (March 3, 1971 in Norwood, Massachusetts[1]) is a Democratic member of the Massachusetts Senate representing the Second Essex and Middlesex district. He has served since January 2011. He is a former state representative of the 17th Essex district in Massachusetts; he was also a candidate running for the United States Congress in the Massachusetts's 5th congressional district special election of 2007. In January 2014, he announced that he would be a candidate for the Democratic nomination for Treasurer and Receiver-General of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Biography[edit]

Barry Finegold was raised in Andover and Tewksbury with his two sisters. Both of his parents taught in the local school system for 33 years, his mother in the Andover Public Schools, and his father at Northern Essex Community College in Haverhill. Finegold attended both Andover and Tewksbury public schools. He then attended Franklin and Marshall College in Pennsylvania, graduating with a major in government with a business concentration. He went on to graduate from the Massachusetts School of Law in Andover and was admitted to the Massachusetts Bar in 1998. He is a partner with the law firm of Dalton & Finegold, LLP, which specializes in real estate, estate planning, and corporate law. Finegold also holds a Masters in Public Administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He and his wife have two daughters and live in Andover.

Public service[edit]

Finegold was elected to the Andover Board of Selectmen at age 24. A year later, in 1996, he won election to the Massachusetts House of Representatives as a Democrat. He was the youngest member of his freshman class. He held this position for 11 years, representing the 17th Essex District, consisting of Andover, Tewksbury and Lawrence. In 2010, he won election to the Massachusetts Senate representing the Second Essex and Middlesex District consisting of Andover, Dracut, Lawrence and Tewksbury. In 2012, he was re-elected to the Senate with 65% of the vote.

He was a candidate in Massachusetts's 5th congressional district special election, 2007. Marty Meehan, the incumbent, stepped down to take the Chancellor position at University of Massachusetts Lowell. He came in fourth place in the Democratic Primary, losing to Niki Tsongas who went on to win the general election. The primary election occurred on September 4, 2007, and the election occurred on October 16, 2007.

During his time on Beacon Hill, Finegold has proposed and enacted numerous pieces of legislation on critical issues, such as:

  • The "Massachusetts Renewable Energy Road Map," a package of policy ideas designed to invigorate the Massachusetts economy and protect the environment with research-and-development grants and tax incentives for Massachusetts companies developing fuel-cell technology. The legislation also creates a $1,500 state tax credit for consumers who purchase hybrid vehicles.[2]
  • The Safe Havens Act allows parents who are unable to care for their newborn to drop the infant off at a marked fire station, police station or emergency room without fear of prosecution. Baby Safe Haven has expanded its services to a hot-line that advises expecting parents on their options. The law has saved 15 babies to date in the Commonwealth.[3]
  • In 2000, Finegold authored the Holocaust Restitution Bill, which ensured that the 3,500 Massachusetts holocaust survivors did not have to pay taxes or incur penalties on recovered assets from the Swiss Government.
  • In the 2007 budget cycle, Finegold brought funding to keep De La Mano, a Spanish-speaking battered women’s hotline, up and running.
  • In Finegold's partnership with police chief John Romero, crime rates have continued to decrease in the city of Lawrence.
  • Finegold brought home funding to ensure that Andover Youth Services can continue in its mission to foster education and personal growth in our youth.
  • With Finegold’s help, the Lawrence school system has benefited from two new buildings, three new schools, and increased funding.

In 1999, Finegold won the Kennedy School Fenn Award for Political Leadership for his leadership in bringing together legislators and officials from New Hampshire and Massachusetts to address the traffic problems on I-93. His efforts led to the opening of the breakdown lane during rush hours, which greatly reduced congestion during peak commuting hours.[4]

In 2003, Finegold was selected as one of the top young Democrats 100 to Watch by the Democratic Leadership Council.

The Massachusetts Alliance on Teen Pregnancy recognized Barry as Legislator of the Year for his efforts to save their programs from drastic budget cuts.

Finegold helped create the Massachusetts Hydrogen Coalition and is working to expand hydrogen, fuel cell, and related industries in the Commonwealth.

Finegold for Congress

2010 State Senate race[edit]

Finegold ran for Massachusetts State Senate in 2010, seeking to represent the Second Essex and Middlesex district. The incumbent, Susan Tucker, was retiring. After winning the Democratic primary election, Finegold faced off against Republican Jamison Tomasek and Tea Party-endorsed independent candidate Jodi Oberto for the seat. Finegold won the race with strong showings in Andover and Lawrence. He lost the towns of Dracut and Tewksbury by narrow margins.

References[edit]

External links[edit]