Barry Sanders (professor)

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Barry Sanders Ph.D.

Barry Sanders Ph.D. is a non-fiction author, eccentric academic, and college professor.

Sanders was a professor at Pitzer College, member of the Claremont Colleges in Southern California, for over 30 years. He currently teaches at Pacific Northwest College of Art, and is a contributing editor at the North American Review. [1][2]

Academic and writing career[edit]

Sanders received an MS from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1960, and an AM from the USC—University of Southern California in 1963. He earned a doctorate in Medieval literature from USC in 1966. [1]

Sanders joined the faculty at Southern Illinois University, and helped students start a radical newspaper to protest the war in Vietnam and organized a three-day teach-in. He received death threats and a request from administrators to take his talents elsewhere. A stint at Valley State College (CSUN) in California ended the same way, Sanders was fired in 1971 not long after being arrested at an anti-war protest along with 200 students. [2]

In 1972 he began at Pitzer College in Claremont, and was a professor in the departments of Literature and the History of Ideas for 33 years. He was the first to hold the Peter S. and Gloria Gold Chair at Pitzer, and retired from the college in 2005.

In 2005 Sanders won a five-year appointment as Senior Fulbright Scholar, to investigate the idea of the Commons in Greece.[3]

He has recently been featured on WNYC's Radiolab program, and is a contributing editor of North American Review. [2]

Sanders currently teaches at Pacific Northwest College of Art (PNCA) in the Pearl District of Portland, Oregon. [1] He is Founding Co-chair of the MA in Critical Theory and Creative Research at at the PNCA Hallie Ford School of Graduate Studies and the Ford Institute for Visual Education. [4] His projects increasingly occur at the intersection of art and activism. [1]

Publications[edit]

Barry Sanders is the author and co-author of fourteen books and over fifty essays and articles, twice been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, and twice a finalist for the Oregon Book Award. [5]

Author[edit]

  • A is for Ox: Violence, Electronic Media, and the Silencing of the Written Word (1994)
  • Sudden Glory: Laughter as Subversive History (1996) — Explores the history of laughter, emphasizing the ways in which it has been used as a means of political subversion.
  • The Private Death of Public Discourse (1998) — thesis is that civil public discourse is possible only if there is the necessary corollary of truly introspective quest for meaning. .
  • The Green Zone: The Environmental Costs of US Militarism (2009) — (finalist in the 2011 Oregon Book Award general nonfiction category.)[2] [6][7]
  • Unsuspecting Souls: The Disappearance of The Human Being (2010) — the collusion of drugs and aesthetics in the late nineteenth century Victorian era. [8] (finalist in the 2011 Oregon Book Award general nonfiction category.)[2]

In 1994 Sanders received his first nomination for a Pulitzer Prize from Random House for his book A is For Ox: Violence, Electronic Media, and the Silencing of the Written Word.

Co-author[edit]

  • The Sacred Paw: The Bear in Nature, Myth, and Literature (1985) — co-author Paul Shepard.
  • ABC, The Alphabetization of the Popular Mind (1989) — co-author Ivan Illich, on the shift from orality to literacy in the European Middle Ages.
  • Alienable Rights: The Exclusion of African Americans in a White Man's Land, 1619–2000 (2004), co-author Francis D. Adams.

In 1998 Sanders received his second nomination for a Pulitzer Prize, by Harper's Magazine, for the book Alienable Rights: The Exclusion of African Americans in a White Man's Land, 1619–2000, with his co-author Francis D. Adams. The Detroit Free Press named it a "Notable Book of the Year".

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]