Barton Coliseum

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Barton Coliseum
Location 2600 Howard St.
Little Rock, Arkansas 72206
Capacity 7,150
Opened 1952

T. H. Barton Coliseum is a 7,150-seat multi-purpose arena, located within the Arkansas State Fairgrounds, in Little Rock, Arkansas. The coliseum was dedicated on September 29, 1952 in honor of Thomas Harry Barton, found of Lion Oil.[1]

It is the former home of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Trojans basketball team, the defunct Arkansas GlacierCats ice hockey team of the WPHL (now d.b.a. as the CHL) and the defunct Arkansas Impact, of the PBL.

The Trojans moved into Alltel Arena, when it opened in 1999 and remained there, until the team moved into Jack Stephens Center in 2005. Prior to the Trojans' move to the Sun Belt Conference, the venue hosted five Atlantic Sun Conference men's basketball tournaments in 1983, 1986, 1987, 1989 and 1990. It has since hosted three Sun Belt Conference men’s basketball tournaments.

During the annual Arkansas State Fair, the coliseum is the venue for the fair's rodeo events. Additionally, it is used as the location throughout the year for spectator events featuring monster trucks, motorcycle acrobatics, and more.

Countless rock concerts were held here until the completion of Alltel Arena. This fan-friendly site sold general admission tickets so that hardcore fans arriving hours before the doors opened could just about guarantee themselves a spot on the barrier. The entire floor of the coliseum was standing room only. Tailgating in the parking lot before the shows made these rock concerts all day parties.

On December 2, 1972 it played host to the Jackson 5 concert.


In 1978, Blue Öyster Cult made a live recording of "(Don't Fear) The Reaper", which was later used on their live album, Some Enchanted Evening.

On October 29, 2012 Rob Zombie along with Marilyn Manson played at Barton Coliseum in support of their Twins of Evil 2012 tour.

The Arkansas High School State Finals were held here in 2013.


References[edit]

  1. ^ "Thomas Henry Barton (1881-1960)". Encyclopediaofarkansas.net. Retrieved 2012-06-07. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 34°43′18″N 92°17′57″W / 34.721659°N 92.299093°W / 34.721659; -92.299093