Basho Technologies

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Basho
Type Private company
Industry Distributed Systems, NoSQL, Cloud storage software
Founded 2008
Headquarters Cambridge, MA
Key people Adam Wray (CEO), Dave McCrory (CTO)
Products Riak, Riak Enterprise, Riak Cloud Storage
Website www.basho.com

Basho Technologies is a distributed systems company that develops a key-value NoSQL database technology, Riak, and an object storage system that is built on the Riak platform, called Riak CS.[1]

Technology and Products[edit]

Basho is the developer of Riak, an open source distributed database that offers high availability, fault tolerance, operation simplicity and scalability.[2] Riak Enterprise is a commercial version of the database offered by Basho, the project's sponsor, with advanced multi-data center replication and enterprise support.[3]

Riak is a key value store system that can collect unstructured data and store it as objects in buckets that can then be queried. It's also highly scalable, able to distribute itself over a server cluster and add new servers as needed, while maintaining its own high availability.[4] Riak is written in Erlang, a language that gives a system built-in support for distribution across a server cluster, fault tolerance, and an ability to absorb new hardware being added to the cluster without disrupting operations.[5]

Basho also offers Riak Cloud Storage (CS), an open source multi-tenant cloud storage database, built on the Riak platform, that integrates with private clouds and public clouds such as Amazon Web Services (AWS). It can be used by enterprises to power internal private clouds and by startups with an Amazon-compatible API for their own download service.[6] Riak CS includes large object support, S3-compatible API and authentication, multi-tenancy and per-user reporting, an operational model for adding capacity, and a visual interface for monitoring and metrics.[7]

Riak 1.0 was released in September 2011 and featured secondary lines, Riak Pipe, Riak Search integration, Lager, and LevelDB support.[8]

Riak 1.1 was released in early 2012 and included numerous changes to Riak Core, a new ownership claim algorithm, Riak KV improvements and MapReduce improvements.[9]

In August 2012, Riak 1.2 was released. Riak Enterprise 1.2 added SSL encryption, better balancing and more granular control of replication across multiple data centers.[10]

In March 2013, Basho released portions of Riak CS code to open source. Basho also announced the commercial version of Riak CS Enterprise, adding multi-datacenter replication, monitoring tools, and 24x7 support.[11][12]

Riak 1.4 features PN-Counters, which is the database's first distributed data type, which are eventually consistent and can be incremented and decremented on any node across the cluster. It has a compact binary data format that reduces storage overheads connected with small objects or large bucket names.[13] Riak CS 1.4 provides compatibility with OpenStack, OpenStack Object Storage (Swift) and CEPH object stores with increased scalability.[14]

Riak 2.0 was released in September 2014[15] and includes support for new data types, tunable consistency and search integration with Apache Solr.[16][17]

History[edit]

Basho Technologies was founded in January 2008 by Earl Galleher, former executive vice president at Akamai Technologies and Antony Falco, former VP of product management and technical services at Akamai.

In 2011, Donald J. Rippert, long time CTO of Accenture joined Basho as president and CEO,[18] and Bobby Patrick, former CMO of GXS and Digex, joined as CMO.[19]

In late 2012, Rippert left Basho and Gregory Collins took over as CEO of Basho.[20]

In March 2014, Collins stepped down and Adam Wray, former CEO of Tier 3, became the new CEO of Basho. At this time Basho’s then CTO, Justin Sheehy, left the company and Dave McCrory, former SVP of engineering at Warner Music Group took over as CTO.[21] McCrory is well known for creating the concept of data gravity, a theory that describes the difficulty of relocating large volumes of data due to the physical restrictions of bandwidth.[22]

In 2012, Basho announced RICON, a two-day distributed systems conference for developers.[23] Basho has hosted RICON West and RICON East in both 2012 and 2013, and hosted a single RICON conference in 2014.

Basho was recognized in the DBTA 100, in the companies that matter most in data, and the CRN Big Data 100 for data management.[24][25]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Woodie, Alex (5 May 2014). "Basho to Bolster Riak with DB Plug-Ins". Retrieved 5 June 2014. 
  2. ^ Harvey, Cynthia (23 May 2014). "60 Open Source Apps You Can Use in the Cloud". Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  3. ^ Finley, Klint (27 September 2011). "Open Source NoSQL Database Riak Hits 1.0". SiliconANGLE. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  4. ^ Babcock, Charles (27 September 2011). "Big Data Gets A Closer Look From Riak". InformationWeek. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  5. ^ Babcock, Charles (27 September 2011). "Big Data Gets A Closer Look From Riak". InformationWeek. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  6. ^ Eagle, Liam (27 March 2012). "Basho Launches Riak CS Cloud Storage Platform, Aims at Service Providers". TheWHIR. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  7. ^ Williams, Alex (20 March 2013). "Basho Open-Sources Riak CS, Its Big Data Storage Software For Companies That Want Their Own Amazon S3 Cloud". TechCrunch. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  8. ^ Finley, Klint (27 September 2011). "Open Source NoSQL Database Riak Hits 1.0". SiliconANGLE. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  9. ^ Popescu, Alex (8 March 2012). "Major Riak Release Includes Tons of Improvements, Plus a Riak Admin UI and Riaknostic.". MyNoSQL. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  10. ^ Popescu, Alex (7 August 2012). "Riak 1.2 Released: Operational Improvements". MyNoSQL. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  11. ^ Williams, Alex (20 March 2013). "Basho Open-Sources Riak CS, Its Big Data Storage Software For Companies That Want Their Own Amazon S3 Cloud". TechCrunch. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  12. ^ Finley, Klint (20 March 2013). "Amazon Cloud Storage Clone Goes Open Source". Wired. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  13. ^ Morgan, DJ Walker (1 July 2013). "Riak 1.4 can count on the cluster". The H. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  14. ^ Henschen, Doug (13 August 2013). "Basho Embraces OpenStack With Riak Cloud Storage". InformationWeek. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  15. ^ Darfler, Benjamin (16 September 2014). "Basho Announces Major Upgrade to Riak". InfoQ. Retrieved 18 November 2014. 
  16. ^ Clark, Jack (30 October 2013). "What do we want? Strong consistency! When do we... oh, it's in Riak v2". The Register. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  17. ^ McCallion, Jane (15 January 2014). "Basho updates Riak database and cloud storage portfolio". CloudPro. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  18. ^ Wauters, Robin (29 June 2011). "Big Data Storage Startup Basho Nabs $7.5M (And Accenture CTO Don Rippert)". TechCrunch. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  19. ^ "Bobby Patrick Chief Marketing Officer, Basho". Storage Newsletter. 8 December 2011. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  20. ^ "Basho Names Gregory M. Collins President and CEO". Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  21. ^ Darrow, Barb (13 March 2014). "Basho brings in two industry vets as CEO and CTO". GigaOM. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  22. ^ Wainewright, Phil (13 March 2014). "New CEO at Basho targets enterprise unstructured data market". Diginomica. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  23. ^ Suri, Isha (13 September 2012). "Get Ready to Listen to Industry Leaders at RICON 2012". SiliconANGLE. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  24. ^ Wells, Joyce (26 June 2013). "DBTA 100: The Companies That Matter Most in Data". DBTA. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  25. ^ Whiting, Rick (11 April 2013). "Big Data 100: Data Management". CRN. Retrieved 6 June 2014.