Basiliximab

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Basiliximab ?
Monoclonal antibody
Type Whole antibody
Source Chimeric (mouse/human)
Target CD25
Clinical data
Trade names Simulect
AHFS/Drugs.com monograph
Pregnancy cat.
Legal status
?
Pharmacokinetic data
Half-life 7.2 days
Identifiers
CAS number 152923-56-3 YesY
ATC code L04AC02
DrugBank DB00074
UNII 9927MT646M YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL1201439 N
Chemical data
Formula C6378H9844N1698O1997S48 
Mol. mass 143801.3 g/mol
 N (what is this?)  (verify)

Basiliximab (trade name Simulect) is a chimeric mouse-human monoclonal antibody to the α chain (CD25) of the IL-2 receptor of T cells. It is used to prevent rejection in organ transplantation, especially in kidney transplants. It is a Novartis product and was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1998.

Uses[edit]

Basiliximab is an immunosuppresant agent used to prevent immediate transplant rejection in people who are receiving kidney transplants, in combination with other agents.[1] It has been reported that some cases of Lichen Planus have been successfully treated with Basiliximab as an alternative therapy to Cyclosporine, with a dose of 20 mg every 4 days. No short-term side effects have been reported [2]

Mechanism of action[edit]

Basiliximab competes with IL-2 to bind to the alpha chain subunit of the IL2 receptor on the surface of the activated T lymphocytes and thus prevents the receptor from signaling. This prevents T cells from replicating and also from activating B cells, which are responsible for the production of antibodies, which would bind to the transplanted organ and stimulate an immune response against the transplant.[3][4]

Physical and chemical properties[edit]

It is a chimeric CD25 monoclonal antibody of the IgG1 isotype.[3][4]

History[edit]

It is a Novartis product and was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1998.[4][5]

References and notes[edit]

  1. ^ MedlinePlus. Last Revised - June 15, 2012 Basiliximab Injection
  2. ^ A.D. Katsambas, T.M. Lotti European handbook of dermatological treatments 2nd edition, 2003, page 291, ISBN 3-540-00878-0
  3. ^ a b Hardinger KL, Brennan DC, Klein CL. Selection of induction therapy in kidney transplantation. Transpl Int. 2013 Jul;26(7):662-72. PMID 23279211
  4. ^ a b c Basiliximab label
  5. ^ Waldman, Thomas A. (2003). Immunotherapy: past, present and future. Nature Medicine 9, 269-277.