Batang Gadis National Park

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Batang Gadis National Park
IUCN category II (national park)
Sorikmarapi.jpg
Sorikmarapi vulcano, the highest point in the national park.
Map showing the location of Batang Gadis National Park
Map showing the location of Batang Gadis National Park
Batang Gadis NP
Location in Sumatra
Location North Sumatra Province, Indonesia
Nearest city Panyabungan
Coordinates 0°43′N 99°30′E / 0.717°N 99.500°E / 0.717; 99.500Coordinates: 0°43′N 99°30′E / 0.717°N 99.500°E / 0.717; 99.500
Area 1,080 km²
Established 2004
Governing body Ministry of Forestry

Batang Gadis is a national park covering 1,080 km2 in North Sumatra province, Indonesia extending between 300 to 2,145 metres altitude. It is named after the Batang Gadis river that flows thorough the park.[1] Signs of the endangered Sumatran tiger and the threatened Asian golden cat, Leopard cat and Clouded leopard were seen in the park. The protection of Batang Gadis as a national park is part of a plan to create the Northern Sumatra biodiversity conservation corridor, which would be connected, via a series of protected areas and forests, to Gunung Leuser National Park in the north of the island.[2]

Flora and fauna[edit]

There are 47 species of mammals, 247 of birds, 240 of vascular plants and 1,500 of microorganisms in the park. The fauna we can found are Sumatran Tiger, Malayan tapir, Malayan porcupine, Asian golden cat, Leopard cat, Indian muntjac, Naemorhedus sumatrae, Java mouse-deer, Binturong, Sun Bear, Sambar deer, Ichtyopis glutinosa, Long-nosed horned frog, etc. There were 13 endemic species of bird recorded in the park, including Salvadori's Pheasant and Schneider's Pitta. By sampling of 200 meter square area, researchers found 242 vascular plants or about 1 percent of all flora in Indonesia.[3]

In 2008 the population of Sumatran tigers has been estimated to be between ca.30 to 100.[4] In 2013 their number has been estimated to be between 23-76, or 20% of the total population.[5]

Conservation and threats[edit]

Parts of the forest within the national park have been protected by the Dutch colonial government in 1921. The proposal for a national park has been submitted by the local government in 2003.[1] Batang Gadis National Park has been declared in 2004.[2]

The wildlife in the park is threatened by poaching, and encroachment by an Australian gold mining company that holds a 200,000-hectare concession that overlaps with the national park.[5]

References[edit]