Battersea Railway Bridge

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Battersea Railway Bridge
BatterseaRailBridge.jpg
Battersea Railway Bridge from the south west
Carries Railway
Crosses River Thames
Locale London, England
Design Arch bridge
Opened 2 March 1863
Heritage status Grade II* listed structure

The Battersea Railway Bridge - properly called the Cremorne Bridge, after the pleasure grounds in Chelsea and originally commonly referred to as the Battersea New Bridge - is a bridge across the River Thames in London, between Battersea and Chelsea and forming part of the West London Line of the London Overground from Clapham Junction to Willesden Junction.

History[edit]

Cremorne Bridge, West London Extension Railway Bridge, Battersea

The bridge was designed by William Baker,[1] chief engineer of the London and North Western Railway, and was opened on 2 March 1863 [2] at a cost of £87,000.[3] It carries two sets of railway lines and consists of five 120-foot (37 m) lattice girder arches set on stone piers.[4]

There is a three-arch brick viaduct on the north side of the bridge, with one arch having been opened to provide a pedestrian route under the railway, as part of the Thames Path. On the south side there are four arches, two of which are used as storage for the residents of a houseboat community located immediately downstream of the bridge.[4]

The bridge was strengthened & refurbished in 1969, and again in 1992. During a high tide in late 2003, the structure was struck by a refuse-barge, and some of the lower structural elements damaged significantly: repairs were completed in early 2004.[5]

In 2013, planning permission was granted for the Diamond Jubilee Footbridge directly upstream from Battersea Railway bridge.

Trains crossing the bridge are subject to a 20/30 mph speed limit (locomotive-hauled traffic is restricted to 20 mph, all other traffic is limited to 30 mph).[2]

The bridge was declared a Grade II* listed structure in 2008, providing protection to preserve its special character from unsympathetic development.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ London bridges images and info (website)
  2. ^ a b Battersea Railway Bridge Tour UK (website)
  3. ^ "Battersea Railway Bridge". Where Thames Smooth Waters Glide. Retrieved 15 December 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "River access supports Battersea Bridge refurb". Maritime Journal. 24 June 2013. Retrieved 15 December 2013. 
  5. ^ "Inspection Report Detailed Bridge Assessments Sub-Package 2A". Retrieved 15 December 2013. 
  6. ^ London bridges get listed status (BBC News) accessed 26 November 2008

Further reading[edit]

  • Loobet, Patrick — Battersea Past, 2002, p49. Historical Publications Ltd. ISBN 0-948667-76-1

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°28′23″N 0°10′45″W / 51.47306°N 0.17917°W / 51.47306; -0.17917