Battle of Baduhenna Wood

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Battle of Baduhenna Wood
Part of the Germanic Wars
Date 28 CE[1]
Location Heiloo,[1]  Netherlands
Result Decisive Frisii victory
Belligerents
Frisii Roman Empire
Commanders and leaders
Lucius Apronius
Strength
Unknown Unknown
Casualties and losses
Unknown 1,300[2]

The Battle of Baduhenna Wood[3] was battle fought near Heiloo, Netherlands in 28 AD[1][4][5] in which the Frisii defeated a Roman army led by Roman General Lucius Apronius.[6]

The earliest mention of the Frisii tells of Drusus' 12 BC war against the Rhine Germans and the Chauci. The Romans did not attack them after devastating the lands of the Rhine Germans, but merely passed through their territory and along their coast in order to attack the Chauci. The account says that the Frisii were "won over", suggesting a Roman suzerainty was imposed.[7] When Drusus brought Roman forces through Frisii lands in 12 BC and "won them over", he placed a moderate tax on them. However, a later Roman governor raised the requirements and exacted payment, at first decimating the herds of the Frisii, then confiscating their land, and finally taking wives and children into bondage. By AD 28 the Frisii had had enough. They hanged the Roman soldiers collecting the tax and forced the governor to flee to a Roman fort, which they then besieged.

Baduhenna Lore from The Annals, Book IV (23-28 C.E.) by the Roman historian Tactitus:

"As soon as this was known to the propraetor of Lower Germany, Lucius Apronius, he summoned from the Upper province the legionary veterans, as well as some picked auxiliary infantry and cavalry. Instantly conveying both armies down the Rhine, he threw them on the Frisii, raising at once the siege of the fortress and dispersing the rebels in defence of their own possessions. Next, he began constructing solid roads and bridges over the neighbouring estuaries for the passage of his heavy troops, and meanwhile having found a ford, he ordered the cavalry of the Canninefates, with all the German infantry which served with us, to take the enemy in the rear. Already in battle array, they were beating back our auxiliary horse as well as that of the legions sent to support them, when three light cohorts, then two more, and after a while the entire cavalry were sent to the attack. They were strong enough, had they charged altogether, but coming up, as they did, at intervals, they did not give fresh courage to the repulsed troops and were themselves carried away in the panic of the fugitives. Apronius entrusted the rest of the auxiliaries to Cethegus Labeo, the commander of the fifth legion, but he too, finding his men's position critical and being in extreme peril, sent messages imploring the whole strength of the legions. The soldiers of the fifth sprang forward, drove back the enemy in a fierce encounter, and saved our cohorts and cavalry, who were exhausted by their wounds. But the Roman general did not attempt vengeance or even bury the dead, although many tribunes, prefects, and first-rank centurions had fallen. Soon afterwards it was ascertained from deserters that nine hundred Romans had been cut to pieces in a wood called Baduhenna's, after prolonging the fight to the next day, and that another body of four hundred, which had taken possession of the house of one Cruptorix, once a soldier in our pay, fearing betrayal, had perished by mutual slaughter."

For whatever reason, the Romans did not seek revenge and the matter was closed. The prestige of the Frisii among the neighboring Germanic tribes was raised considerably.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Baduhenna". www.angelfire.com. April 2012. 
  2. ^ Peter Loughran, The Mystery of the King, p.155
  3. ^ Tacitus, The Annals: Volume 1, p.204
  4. ^ Ken Dowden, European Paganism: The Realities of Cult from Antiquity to the Middle Ages, p.112
  5. ^ Camden House, European Paganism: Camden House History of German Literature, p.100
  6. ^ http://www.wyrdwords.vispa.com/goddesses/baduhenna/tacitus.html
  7. ^ Lucius Cassius Dio Cocceianus (229), "Book LIV, Ch 32", in Carl, Earnest (translator), Dio's Roman History VI, London: William Heinemann (published 1917), p. 365 
  8. ^ Tacitus 117:147–148, The Annals, Bk IV, Ch 72–74. Events of AD 15–16.