Battle of Glodjane

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Battle of Glodjane
Part of Kosovo War
Date August 11 – 12 1998
Location Glodjane, near Đakovica
Result Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Yugoslav victory[1]
Belligerents
 FR Yugoslavia UCK KLA.png KLA
Commanders and leaders
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Sreten Lukić UCK KLA.png Ramush Haradinaj
UCK KLA.png Bekim Berisha
Strength
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 500 soldiers and policemen[citation needed] UCK KLA.png250 insurgents[citation needed]
Casualties and losses
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 2 soldiers killed
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 5 policemen killed[2]
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 10 policemen wounded[3]
(by 13 August 1998)
UCK KLA.png8 insurgents killed
UCK KLA.png49 insurgents wounded[4]
(by 13 August 1998)
The bodies of 30-37 individuals were found in Lake Radonjić canal shortly afterwards[5][6][7]

The term Battle of Glodjane (Serbian: Битка за Глођане; Albanian: Beteja e Glloxhanit) refers to clashes that occurred in the village of Glodjane in 1998 between the Kosovo Albanian militant group known as the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) and the Yugoslav military and Serbian police forces[a] during the Kosovo War. The clashes represented a series of military offensives launched by the Yugoslav army and Serbian police to address a growing KLA presence within Kosovo Albanian villages.[8]

Background[edit]

In Kosovo, Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) forces gained strength and tended to control villages away from the main roads while Yugoslav military forces were positioned on the hills around Lake Radonjić.[9] Throughout the summer of 1998, Yugoslav forces shelled Albanian villages surrounding Lake Radonjić on a daily basis.[10] In the same time, the KLA launched increasingly bold attacks on Serbian targets and civilians.

Clashes[edit]

The Yugoslav forces first broke through the KLA lines and entered Glodjane around 10–11 August 1998 as reported by BBC Correspondent Jeremey Cooke who was on the scene. He reported that the Serbs "knew they had the upper hand" and had "shelled and machine-gunned" the village of Glodjane into submission.[11] Cooke reported seeing houses shelled and livestock slaughtered to prevent rebels from reentering the village; the Serbian paramilitary police were involved in the operation.[12]

The next military offensive involving Glodjane occurred in the beginning of September.[13] KLA forces had regrouped and in September, the Yugoslav military moved through the villages around the lake in order to attack and expel the KLA: Colonel John Crosland an English military officer attached to the VJ, witnessed this first hand commented on the destruction caused by those forces.[14] He noted that he personally witnessed looting and burning of houses by Yugoslav forces and that the village of Prilep was razed to 18 inches about the ground.[15] He stated that VJ forces, Serbian police forces and paramilitary police forces including (MUP, PJP, SAJ) and JSO (Frenki's boys) were involved in the offensive.[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mojsilovic, Julijana (13 August 1998). "KLA rebels lose stronghold". London: The Independent. Retrieved 8 October 2012. 
  2. ^ "Serb forces ignore calls for cease-fire". Deseret News. 13 August 1998. Retrieved 3 March 2013. 
  3. ^ "Serbs 'take' Kosovo rebel base". BBC. 14 August 1998. Retrieved 3 March 2013. 
  4. ^ "Serbs Seize One Rebel Redoubt, Attack Second". Los Angeles Times. 13 August 1998. Retrieved 3 March 2013. 
  5. ^ Heike Krieger (2001). The Kosovo conflict and international law: an analytical documentation 1974–1999. Cambridge University Press. pp. 38–. ISBN 978-0-521-80071-6. Retrieved 30 April 2011. 
  6. ^ "fourth amended indictment". U.N. 16 October 2007. Retrieved 6 February 2013. 
  7. ^ "Trial Chamber Judgment". U.N. 3 April 2008. Retrieved 6 February 2013. 
  8. ^ "Public Testimony of John Crosland, transcript". U.N. 23 May 2007. Retrieved 6 February 2013. 
  9. ^ "Trial Chamber Judgment - para 148". U.N. 3 April 2008. Retrieved 6 February 2013. 
  10. ^ "Trial Chamber Judgment - para 96". U.N. 3 April 2008. Retrieved 6 February 2013. 
  11. ^ "ICTY Public Testimony of Achilleas Papas page 4284". U.N. 17 May 2007. Retrieved 7 February 2013. 
  12. ^ "ICTY Public Testimony of Achilleas Papas page 4284". U.N. 17 May 2007. Retrieved 7 February 2013. 
  13. ^ "Public Testimony of John Crosland, transcript". U.N. 23 May 2007. Retrieved 6 February 2013. 
  14. ^ "Public Testimony of John Crosland, transcript page 4666-4670". U.N. 23 May 2007. Retrieved 6 February 2013. 
  15. ^ "Public Testimony of John Crosland, transcript page 4666-4670". U.N. 23 May 2007. Retrieved 6 February 2013. 
  16. ^ "Public Testimony of John Crosland, transcript page 4666-4670". U.N. 23 May 2007. Retrieved 6 February 2013. 

Notes[edit]

a.   ^ In the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (1992-2003) and its successor Serbia and Montenegro (2003-2006), the security structure meant that there was one national army (Vojska Jugoslavije) but separate police divisions per republic. All operations carried out by the Serbian police during the Kosovo war were sanctioned by and represented the central government in Belgrade.