Battle of Rosillo Creek

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Battle of Rosillo Creek (also known as the Battle of Rosalis) was a conflict of the Mexican War of Independence occurring March 29, 1813 in Coahuila y Tejas, approximately nine miles southeast of San Antonio de Bexar near the confluence of Rosillo Creek and Salado Creek.

The combatants[edit]

The battle was fought between the Republican Army of the North, which was led by Bernardo Gutiérrez de Lara, Samuel Kemper, and Augustus Magee. And the Spanish Royalist force which was commanded by Manuel María de Salcedo, the Governor of Texas, and Simón de Herrera, the Governor of Nuevo León.

Background[edit]

In 1812, the Republican Army of the North, composed of Anglo-Americans, Mexicans and Indians, along with some help from the United States, crossed over from Louisiana into Texas. Flying a green flag, they captured the town of Nacogdoches on August 7, 1812. The Republican Army of the North then marched to Goliad, where they captured Presidio La Bahia. From November 13, 1812, to February 19, 1813, they were besieged, when the Royalist Army gathered to confront them. Unable to defeat the Republican Army, they retreated back to San Antonio. Samuel Kemper, who had also been involved in the 1804 rebellion in Florida, and The Republican Army, now numbering about 900 men, pursued.

The battle[edit]

In March 1813 the Royalist force numbering 1,500 men planned to ambush the Republican Army from a ridge overlooking Rosillo Creek. Their trap failed when they were detected by the Republican forces, who defeated them in less than an hour. At a cost of six men, the Republican Army killed 100 to 330 Royalists and captured materiel including six cannon and 1,500 equines.

Aftermath[edit]

The Royalists retreated to San Antonio where they surrendered to the Republican Army on April 1. Two days later Salcedo, Herrera and 12 others were executed by the victors. April 6 the Republican Army issued a draft declaration of independence.

Location[edit]

The battle site is near the present-day intersection of W. W. White and Hildebrandt streets in southeastern Bexar County in the U.S. state of Texas, 9 miles southeast of what is now downtown San Antonio.

See also[edit]

Sources[edit]

  • 1. "The Sons of the Republic of Texas" By Thomas B. Green, 2003,
  • 2. "Texas Tales Your Teacher Never Told You" by C. F. Eckhardt, published by Wordware publishing, Inc. Regional Division.
  • 3. "Program for Ceremonies Commemorating The 175th Anniversary of The Battle of Medina August 21, 1988" by Robert H. Thonhoff.
  • 4. "Report of The Battle of Medina by Spanish participant Joaquin de Arredondo" translated by Mattie Austin Hatcher in The Texas Historical Association Quarterly XI no. 3 January 1908 pages 200 - 236.
  • 5. "Green Flag Over Texas" by Julia Kathryn Garrett, Cordova Press, New York.

External links[edit]