Battle of San Jacinto (1899)

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For the battle during the Texas Revolution, see Battle of San Jacinto.
Battle of San Jacinto
Part of the Philippine–American War
Date November 11, 1899
Location San Jacinto, Pangasinan, Philippines
Result U.S. victory
Belligerents
 United States  First Philippine Republic
Commanders and leaders
United States Loyd Wheaton First Philippine Republic Manuel Tinio
Strength
33rd USV Infantry Regiment 1,200
Casualties and losses
8 killed
13 wounded
134 killed

The Battle of San Jacinto was a battle during the Philippine–American War fought on November 11, 1899, in San Jacinto, Pangasinan, Philippines, between the Filipinos and the United States.

Background[edit]

During the fall of 1899, General Elwell S. Otis began a three-pronged offensive against the Filipinos north of Manila. General Arthur MacArthur's 2nd Division was moving north along the railroad running out of Manila, General Henry W. Lawton's 1st Division moved up the Pampanga River against San Isidro.[1]:139 The third expedition would be led by General Loyd Wheaton, commander of the 1st Brigade, 2nd Division. Wheaton's brigade was detached and landed at San Fabian on Lingayen Gulf.[1]:139 After landing on 7 Nov., Wheaton sent out patrols to the south and west towards Dagupan.[1]:149

Brig. Gen. Manuel Tinio's 1,200 brigade had established his headquarters in San Jacinto in early Nov., building barricaded, trenches and obstacles.[1]:150

Battle[edit]

The 33rd's advance company were ambushed on the road to San Jacinto forcing them to the muddy rice fields to the right and Major Peyton C. March's battalion to the left.[1]:150-151 March's men were able to flank the Filipono's and entered the town, forcing the Tinio Brigade to retreat.[1]:151 8 US soldiers were killed, including Major John Alexander Logan, Jr..

Aftermath[edit]

Wheaton and MacArthur's forces joined on the 26th at Mangatarem,_Pangasinan, when the 36th Infantry joined Capt. Godfrey Fowler's Company F, 33rd Infantry.[1]:151 Fowler had earlier forced Brig. Gen. Jose Alejandrino's 500-1000 troops to abandon their artillery, supplies and 100 Spanish prisoners.[1]:151

Reference[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Linn, B.M., 2000, The Philippine War, 1899-1902, Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, ISBN 0700612254

See also[edit]