Battlefield Detectives

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Battlefield Detectives
Format Documentary
Country of origin  United States
No. of seasons 4
No. of episodes 32
Production
Running time 48/49 minutes (60 with ads)
Broadcast
Original channel History Channel
Original run 4 October 2003 – 19 November 2006

Battlefield Detectives is a forensic documentary television series that aired on the History Channel from 2003 to 2006. The series explores famous battles focusing on the battlefield itself, and tell its story based on recent scientific research. It uses modern science to examine how the battles were won or lost.[1]

According to History Television, "This series approaches the perennially interesting topic of famous battles in a fresh and exhilarating way. Focusing on the battlefield itself, each programme takes an important battle telling its story and posing a puzzling central question about the battle that recent scientific research is helping to illuminate - a contemporary journey of discovery and a compelling story from the past."[2]

List of episodes[edit]

Episode name / Original Air Date[3][4]

Season 1 (9 episodes)[edit]

Season 2 (8 episodes)[edit]

Season 3 (13 episodes)[edit]

Season 4 (2 episodes)[edit]

Book[edit]

  • Battlefield Detectives [illustrated] by David Wason.
  • (Hardcover/Paperback) 256 pages
  • March 2003
  • Publisher: Granada Media
  • ISBN 0233050833

This book reflects on seven of the most famous battlefields in history: The Battle of Hastings, The Battle of Agincourt, The Spanish Armada, Waterloo, The Charge of the Light Brigade, The Battle of Little Bighorn, and Gallipoli,

It uses traditional methods and modern technology to discover what really happened on the day. The results include new and controversial insights into some of the world’s enduring military mysteries.

Battlefield Detectives uses evidence uncovered by a team of experts from a wide range of disciplines: archaeologists, forensic scientists, crowd dynamics specialists, metal-detectorists and military experts contribute to a new understanding of these fields of war.[5]

References[edit]