Bawtry railway station

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Bawtry
Bawtry railway station 1864361 bc188960.jpg
Bawtry station in 1967
Location
Place Bawtry
Area Doncaster
Coordinates 53°26′11″N 1°00′53″W / 53.4363°N 1.0146°W / 53.4363; -1.0146Coordinates: 53°26′11″N 1°00′53″W / 53.4363°N 1.0146°W / 53.4363; -1.0146
Grid reference SK655937
Operations
Original company Great Northern Railway
Pre-grouping Great Northern Railway
Post-grouping London and North Eastern Railway
Eastern Region of British Railways
Platforms ?
History
4 September 1849[1] Opened
6 October 1958 Closed to passengers
30 April 1971[2] Goods facilities withdrawn
Disused railway stations in the United Kingdom
Closed railway stations in Britain
A B C D–F G H–J K–L M–O P–R S T–V W–Z
UK Railways portal

Bawtry railway station was situated to the east of the town of Bawtry, South Yorkshire, England on the Great Northern Railway main line between Retford and Doncaster.

History[edit]

The lengthy platforms were situated to the north of the long, low viaduct, the main buildings being on the town (down) side of the line. A signal box was provided on the north end of the London-bound platform. The station was unique in its structures, these being highly individual. The main building had a small portico leading to the booking office at the front with all the usual facilities within the building. Platform shelters were in wood in typical style of the GNR.

In the first half of the 20th century the royal family customarily attended Doncaster races. They would alight at Bawtry, being greeted with the usual enthusiasm, and proceed by road to the racecourse.

Preceding station Historical railways Following station
Rossington   London and North Eastern Railway
Retford to Doncaster
  Scrooby

Present day[edit]

The buildings and platforms have been swept away but a couple of goods yard buildings are now houses.

In a report to Doncaster Borough Council in September 2008 land near the station has been protected should the site be required as a new station, with car parking facilities, in the future as the town grows.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Butt, R.V.J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations, Patrick Stephens Ltd, Sparkford, ISBN 1-85260-508-1, p. 29.
  2. ^ Clinker, C.R. (October 1978). Clinker's Register of Closed Passenger Stations and Goods Depots in England, Scotland and Wales 1830-1977. Bristol: Avon-AngliA Publications & Services. p. 10. ISBN 0-905466-19-5. 
  • "South Yorkshire Railway Stations on old postcards" by Norman Ellis. Reflections of a Bygone Age. ISBN 0-946245-88-6
  • Report to Doncaster Borough Council on the planning strategy of preserving access and opening stations on rail routes in the borough. (The Star, Saturday, 14 February 2009)

External links[edit]