Bayview – New York Bay Cemetery

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Bayview - New York Bay Cemetery
Freudenberg-Helen grave 03.jpg
Details
Established 1848
Location Jersey City, New Jersey
Country USA
Type Protestant

Bayview Cemetery, previously called Greenville Cemetery, is located in Jersey City, New Jersey. It merged with New York Bay Cemetery and is now known as Bayview – New York Bay Cemetery.[1][2][3] The cemetery is located in the Greenville Section near Danforth Avenue Station. A former turnpike, the Bergen Point Plank Road, now Garfield Avenue, runs through the cemetery.

The cemetery contains a memorial and plots of several employees of the Cunard Shipping Line.[4] Ziegler served as president of the Cemetery, from 1935 to 1957.[5]

The cemetery contains a section which is an early Jewish burial ground, unique to Hudson County[6]

Notable burials[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Van Winkle, Daniel (1923). History of the Municipalities of Hudson County, 1630-1923. ISBN 0-8328-5067-5. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Bayview-New York Bay Cemetery". New Jersey City University. Archived from the original on 23 August 2007. Retrieved 2007-08-26. The cemetery resulted from the merger of the Bay View and New York Bay cemeteries in the 1840s. It fills an expansive area between Garfield and Ocean Avenues and the sloped area from Garfield Avenue to the bottom of the hill, with a view of New York City, in the southeastern section of Jersey City. The primary entrances are located on Ocean Avenue and at the intersection of Garfield and Chapel Avenues. 
  3. ^ Egan, Colin (Fall 1991). "The Hudson Underground". Hudson County Magazine. 
  4. ^ Sarapin, Janice Kohl (2002). Old Burial Grounds of New Jersey. Rutgers University Press. ISBN 0-8135-2111-4. 
  5. ^ The National Cyclopedia of American Biography. 1984. Ziegler served as president of Bayview Cemetery, Jersey City, from 1935 to 1957. 
  6. ^ Jersey Journal undated
  7. ^ "Paul Broeser's Suicide". The New York Times. August 31, 1883. Retrieved 2008-10-08. The suicide of Paul Broeser, a young German, on his wife's grave, in the New-York Bay Cemetery, recalls the romantic story of his marriage. His wife was the daughter of John A. Schuler, of Jersey City Heights. 
  8. ^ "William Davis Daly". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 2008-10-08. a Representative from New Jersey; born in Jersey City, N.J., June 4, 1851; attended the public schools; from the age of fourteen until he was nineteen was employed as an iron molder; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1874 and commenced practice in Hudson County, N.J.; assistant United States attorney for New Jersey 1885-1888; member of the State house of assembly 1889-1891; judge of the district court of Hoboken from 1891 until his resignation in 1892; member of the State senate 1892-1898; delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1896; chairman of the Democratic State convention in 1896 and member of the State committee 1896-1898; elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-sixth Congress and served from March 4, 1899, until his death in Hoboken, N.J., July 31, 1900; interment in New York Bay Cemetery. 
  9. ^ "William Davis Daly". The Political Graveyard. Archived from the original on 10 October 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-08. also known as William D. Daly — of Hoboken, Hudson County, N.J. Born in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., June 4, 1851. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1888, 1892, 1896; member of New Jersey state house of assembly, 1889-91; district judge in New Jersey, 1891-92; member of New Jersey state senate from Hudson County, 1893-98; member of New Jersey Democratic State Committee, 1896-98; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 7th District, 1899-1900; died in office 1900. Died in Hoboken, Hudson County, N.J., July 31, 1900. Interment at Bayview Cemetery. 
  10. ^ "Edward Irving Edwards". The Political Graveyard. Archived from the original on 10 October 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-08. also known as Edward I. Edwards — of Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J. Born in Bergen town (now part of Jersey City), Hudson County, N.J., December 1, 1863. Son of William W. Edwards and Emma J. (Nation) Edwards; brother of William D. Edwards; married, November 14, 1888, to Jule Blanche Smith (died 1928). Democrat. General contractor; banker; New Jersey state comptroller, 1911-17; member of New Jersey state senate from Hudson County, 1919; Governor of New Jersey, 1920-23; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1920; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1923-29; defeated, 1928. Episcopalian. Welsh and English ancestry. Member, American Bankers Association; Freemasons; Eagles; Elks; Moose; Zeta Psi. Depressed over political and financial misfortunes, the deaths of those close to him, and his own poor health, he shot himself with a revolver, in his bed, and died, in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., January 26, 1931. Interment at Bayview Cemetery. 
  11. ^ "George Bragg Fielder". The Political Graveyard. Archived from the original on 10 October 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-08. also known as George B. Fielder — of New Jersey. Born in New Jersey, 1842. Son of James F. Fielder; brother-in-law of William Brinkerhoff; father of James Fairman Fielder. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New Jersey 7th District, 1893-95. Died in 1906. Interment at Bayview Cemetery. 
  12. ^ Horwitz, Marli (July 24, 2013). "Anniversary ceremony honors Jersey City's first fallen firefighter". The Jersey Journal. Retrieved 2013-07-24. 
  13. ^ Arthur Harry Moore biography, United States Congress. Accessed August 11, 2007
  14. ^ "Arthur Harry Moore". The Political Graveyard. Archived from the original on 10 October 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-08. also known as A. Harry Moore — Governor of New Jersey, 1926-29, 1932-35, 1938-41; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1935-38 Interment at Bayview Cemetery. 
  15. ^ [1] CWGC casualty record.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°41′43″N 74°05′15″W / 40.6953803°N 74.0873641°W / 40.6953803; -74.0873641