Beaconsfield (UK Parliament constituency)

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Coordinates: 51°36′36″N 0°38′42″W / 51.610°N 0.645°W / 51.610; -0.645

Beaconsfield
County constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Beaconsfield in .
County Buckinghamshire
Electorate 75,320 (December 2010)[1]
Major settlements Beaconsfield, Marlow
Current constituency
Created 1974 (1974)
Member of Parliament Dominic Grieve (Conservative)
Number of members One
Created from South Buckinghamshire
Overlaps
European Parliament constituency South East England

Beaconsfield /ˈbɛkənzfld/ is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 1997 by Dominic Grieve QC of the Conservative Party who is currently Attorney General of England and Wales.[n 2]

Settlements and boundaries[edit]

It consists of Beaconsfield, most of Burnham (including Burnham Beeches forest), Denham, Dorney, Farnham Royal, Fulmer, Gerrards Cross, Hedgerley, Iver, Stoke Poges, Taplow and Wexham (excluding Wexham Court);[n 3] Hedsor, Little Marlow, Marlow, Wooburn and Bourne End and the Flackwell Heath settlement of Chepping Wycombe.[n 4] Although situated in the northwestern part of Beaconsfield, Knotty Green is in the Chiltern district so is excluded at present from the constituency.

Boundary review[edit]

Following their review of parliamentary representation in Buckinghamshire, the Boundary Commission for England made minor changes to the existing Beaconsfield constituency prior to the 2010 General Election. The electoral wards used in the redrawn seat are:

  • The entire South Bucks district;
  • Flackwell Heath and Little Marlow, Hedsor-cum-Bourne End, and The Wooburns, in the Wycombe district;
  • Marlow North and West, and Marlow South East in the Wycombe district, previously in the Wycombe constituency.

History[edit]

The constituency was created in 1974, mostly from the former seat of South Buckinghamshire, since which date the area has formed the southernmost part of Buckinghamshire — before 1974 the notable settlements of Slough and Eton, and less well-known Langley, Wraysbury, Sunnymeads and Datchet were in the county. This leads to the unusual shape of the constituency, further accentuated in irregularity by the Thames meander containing Cookham, Berkshire to the west and southwest. It is traditionally one of the safest Conservative seats in Britain.

2010 election[edit]

The Conservative incumbent's win in 2010, Dominic Grieve, with 61.1% of the vote, was the second highest share of the vote in the general election after William Hague in Richmond, North Yorkshire.

1982 candidates[edit]

In the Beaconsfield by-election, 1982 caused by the death of Sir Ronald Bell, the third-placed candidate was Tony Blair for the Labour. Tim Smith is the last person to have beaten Blair in an election. Paul Tyler was in second place; he later became an MP for North Cornwall, meaning that, most unusually, the three main-party candidates subsequently served in the House of Commons at the same time.

Members of Parliament[edit]

Election Member[2] Party
Feb 1974 Sir Ronald Bell Conservative
1982 by-election Tim Smith Conservative
1997 Dominic Grieve Conservative

Elections[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

General Election 2010: Beaconsfield[3]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Dominic Grieve 32,053 61.1 +7.0
Liberal Democrat John Edwards 10,271 19.6 −2.4
Labour Jeremy Miles 6,135 11.7 −7.8
UKIP Delphine Gray-Fisk 2,597 4.9 +0.1
Green Jem Bailey 768 1.5 N/A
Independent Quentin Baron 191 0.4 N/A
Majority 21,782 41.5
Turnout 52,490 70.0 +6.8
Conservative hold Swing +4.7

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

General Election 2005: Beaconsfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Dominic Grieve 24,126 55.4 +2.6
Liberal Democrat Peter Chapman 8,873 20.4 −1.2
Labour Alex Sobel 8,422 19.4 −2.4
UKIP John Fagan 2,102 4.8 +0.9
Majority 15,253 35.0
Turnout 43,523 63.9 +3.1
Conservative hold Swing +1.9
General Election 2001: Beaconsfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Dominic Grieve 22,233 52.8 +3.5
Labour Stephen Lathrope 9,168 21.8 +1.7
Liberal Democrat Stephen Lloyd 9,117 21.6 +0.3
UKIP Andrew Moffatt 1,626 3.9 +3.0
Majority 13,065 31.0
Turnout 42,144 60.8 −12.0
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

General Election 1997: Beaconsfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Dominic Grieve 24,709 49.2 −14.8
Liberal Democrat Peter G.D. Mapp 10,722 21.4 +2.1
Labour Alastair S. Hudson 10,063 20.0 +6.5
Referendum Party Humphrey A. Lloyd 2,197 4.4 N/A
Independent Conservative Christopher Story 1,434 2.9 N/A
UKIP Christopher W.R. Cooke 451 0.9 N/A
ProLife Alliance Mrs. Gillian S. Duval 286 0.6 N/A
Natural Law Tom W.S. Dyball 193 0.4 +0.0
Independent Robert R. Matthews 146 0.3 N/A
Majority 13,987 27.9 −16.7
Turnout 50,201 72.8
Conservative hold Swing −8.2
General Election 1992: Beaconsfield[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Tim Smith 33,817 64.0 −2.0
Liberal Democrat Ms. Anne Purse 10,220 19.3 −4.4
Labour Graham Smith 7,163 13.5 +3.2
Independent Conservative William F. Foulds 1,317 2.5 +2.5
Natural Law Andrew P.O. Foss 196 0.4 N/A
Independent Ms. Joan Martin 166 0.3 +0.3
Majority 23,597 44.6 +2.4
Turnout 52,879 79.0 +4.4
Conservative hold Swing +1.2

Elections in the 1980s[edit]

General Election 1987: Beaconsfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Tim Smith 33,324 66.0
Liberal David H. Ive 11,985 23.7
Labour Ken J. Harper 5,203 10.3
Majority 21,339 42.3
Turnout 74.6
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1983: Beaconsfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Tim Smith 30,552 63.8
Liberal D.H. Ive 12,252 25.6
Labour J.S. Smith 5,107 10.7
Majority 18,300 38.2
Turnout 72.4
Conservative hold Swing
By-election 1982: Beaconsfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Tim Smith 23,049 61.8 +0.1
Liberal Paul Tyler 9,996 26.8 +8.7
Labour Tony Blair 3,886 10.4 −9.8
New Britain Michael Byrne 225 0.6 N/A
Democratic Monarchist Bill Boaks 99 0.3 N/A
Benn in Ten Unless Proportional Representation Thomas Keen 51 0.1 N/A
Majority 13,053 35.0 −8.2
Turnout 37,306
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

General Election 1979: Beaconsfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Ronald Bell 31,938 61.7 +13.4
Labour E.L. Glasson 10,443 20.2 −5.2
Liberal P. Meyer 8,853 17.1 −9.1
National Front J. Noyes 548 1.1 N/A
Majority 21,495 41.5 +19.4
Turnout 51,782 76.2 +6.0
Conservative hold Swing
General Election October 1974: Beaconsfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Ronald Bell 23,234 48.3
Liberal W.H. Eastwell 12,606 26.2
Labour M. Johnson 12,253 25.5
Majority 10,628 22.1
Turnout 48,093 70.2
Conservative hold Swing
General Election February 1974: Beaconsfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Ronald Bell 26,040 49.6 N/A
Liberal W.H. Eastwell 14,792 28.2 N/A
Labour P.M. Jones 11,691 22.3 N/A
Majority 11,248 21.4 N/A
Turnout 52,523 77.3 N/A
Conservative win (new seat)

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
  3. ^ These are all civil parishes in the South Bucks district
  4. ^ These are all civil parishes in the Wycombe (district)
References
  1. ^ "Electorate Figures - Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Retrieved 13 March 2011. 
  2. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "B" (part 1)[self-published source][better source needed]
  3. ^ "Beaconsfield". YourNextMP. Retrieved 19 March 2010. 
  4. ^ "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Retrieved 6 Dec 2010. 

Sources[edit]