Bears–Packers rivalry

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Chicago Bears–Green Bay Packers
Chicago Bears logo.svg Green Bay Packers logo.svg
Teams involved Chicago Bears and Green Bay Packers
First contested November 27, 1921
Chicago 20, Green Bay 0
Number of meetings 188 meetings
Most recent meeting December 29, 2013
Green Bay 33, Chicago 28
Next meeting September 28, 2014
All-time series CHI: leads 93–89–6
Postseason results
First meeting

December 14, 1941, CHI 33, GB 14

Last Meeting
January 23, 2011, GB 21, CHI 14
Largest victory CHI: 61–7 (1980)
Longest win streak GB: W10 (1994–1998)
CHI: W8 (1985–1988)
Current streak GB: 1 win (2013)

The Bears–Packers rivalry is a rivalry between the Chicago Bears and Green Bay Packers of the National Football League. The two clubs have won a combined 22 NFL championships (including 5 Super Bowls) and have 48 members in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

The rivalry began in 1921 and is the league's most played, with 188 regular-season and post-season games.[1] (Note that the rivalry is not the league's longest continuous rivalry, as the 1982 strike-shortened NFL season did not include a Bears–Packers game. That title goes to the Lions–Packers rivalry, who have played each other at least twice a year since 1932. It should also be noted that one meeting between the Bears and Lions was canceled in 1987 due to another strike.) Because both the Packers and Bears are in the same division—the NFC North—they play each other twice every regular season.

Chicago currently leads the series 93–89–6.

Notable moments and games[edit]

1921–1941[edit]

  • Bears 20, Packers 0 (November 27, 1921) – The two organizations played for the first time in 1921 at Chicago, when the Bears were nicknamed the Chicago Staleys. Bears' Gaylord "Pete" Stinchcomb scored the game's first touchdown on a 45-yard run. The Bears would go on to shut out the Packers 20-0 in their first meeting, and the rivalry was born. A year later, the Staleys would officially change their team name to the Bears.
  • Bears 3, Packers 0 (November 23, 1924) – The Bears–Packers rivalry can be credited for the first ever ejection of players for fighting during an NFL game. The Bears' Frank Hanny and Packers' Tillie Voss were ejected before the end of the first half as verbal exchanges led to punches being thrown. Two years later, Hanny was ejected once again in a game versus Green Bay.[2]
  • Packers 7, Bears 0 (September 28, 1930) – The Packers shut out the Bears for the fifth consecutive game in this contest which is the longest such streak in the series. The streak began in 1928 when the Packers defeated the Bears 6–0 on December 9 of that season.[3] In 1929 the Packers shut out the Bears three times, 23–0, 14–0, and 25–0 en route to their first NFL championship.[4][5] Later that season, on November 9, the Bears would finally score on the Packers although they came up short in the final score 13–12.[6] The Packers would go on to win their second consecutive NFL title that season.[7]
  • Packers 16, Bears 14 (November 2, 1941) – The Bears came into the game undefeated and seemingly invincible. Over their first five games, they defeated their rivals by an unprecedented 157 points.[8] However, the Packers upset them in this game which would be the Bears lone defeat that season. The Associated Press deemed the game as the "Chicago Bears Myth is Broken".[9] Chicago fans made accusations that the game had been fixed,[10] and it was suggested that the Packers had employed a "secret" defensive scheme.[11] The Packers had built a 16–0 lead through the first three quarters of play before the Bears mounted a comeback in the fourth quarter coming up just short of a win.[12]
  • Bears 33, Packers 14 (December 14, 1941) – In the first playoff meeting between the two rivals, the Bears defeated the Packers 33–14 in a one-game-playoff to determine the Western Division championship. After the Packers, the Bears defeated the New York Giants en route to their fourth NFL Championship. Until the 2010 post-season, this remained the only playoff meeting between the teams.

1962–1971[edit]

  • Packers 49, Bears 0 (September 30, 1962) – Vince Lombardi's Packers shutout George Halas' Bears, 49–0 at City Stadium, the Packers largest margin of victory in the rivalry. Strangely, the team repeated that exact score against the Eagles six weeks later on Nov 11, 1962. The games remain a Packers team record for most points in a shutout victory. After again humiliating the Bears later in the season, this time by a score of 38–7, the Packers would go on to win their 8th NFL championship. Motivated by the two humiliating losses to the Packers, Halas would spend the off season focusing on beating the Packers. In 1963, the Bears handed the Packers their only two losses, and would themselves win their 8th NFL championship.
  • Packers 23, Bears 12 (September 13, 1964) – Remembered as the "Free Kick Game" because the Packers invoked the surprising "Fair catch kick rule", which allows for a place or drop kick field goal attempt from the spot of a fair catch. Elijah Pitts fair caught a Bears punt on the Bears' 48-yard-line just before the end of the first half. Packers' coach Vince Lombardi opted to attempt a free kick. Confusion ensued as neither team had ever so much as even practiced a free kick. The Packers lined up at the line of scrimmage with Bart Starr holding for Paul Hornung. Hornung made the 52-yard field goal as the first half ended. The Packers stunned all in attendance with the kick, and went on to win the game 23–12.
  • Bears 13, Packers 10 (November 3, 1968) – The Bears got their revenge on the Packers, beating them 13–10 on a fair catch free kick by Mac Percival at the 43-yard line after a Packers punt with :26 left in the game. Interestingly, Percival kicked a game-winner the week before against the Minnesota Vikings.[13]
  • Bears 2, Packers 0 (August 7, 1971) – Although it was only an exhibition — Dan Devine's first as head coach of the Packers – it will long be remembered as an exercise in futility. The Bears won when 6-foot-7 quarterback Frank Patrick of the Packers, who had been drafted as a tight end the year before and miscast as a quarterback, faded back to pass in the third quarter beyond the end line at Milwaukee's County Stadium for a safety and the only score of the game.

1980s[edit]

  • Packers 12, Bears 6 (September 7, 1980) – With the score tied 6–6 and the game in overtime, Packers kicker Chester Marcol was called in to attempt a game-winning field goal. The Bears’ Alan Page managed to break through and block the field goal, with the football hitting his helmet. The ball rebounded back to the bespectacled Marcol, and before anyone on the field had realized what happened, Marcol crossed the goal line to score the winning touchdown for the Packers.
  • Bears 61, Packers 7[14] (December 7, 1980) – In the game, the Bears scored eight offensive touchdowns. After the Packers had suffered the second most lopsided defeat in their history, Bart Starr charged across the field to confront Bears coach Neill Armstrong. Starr was upset because Bears defensive coordinator Buddy Ryan had the Bears blitzing from all angles in the fourth quarter, even after the Packers inserted backup quarterback David Whitehurst with the score 48-7.[15] "Bart Starr was upset," Armstrong said after the game. "He did the talking and I did the listening. He said he'd rather not hear what I had to say, something to that effect, and he left." Two years later, Bill Tobin, the Bears' vice president of player personnel at the time, revealed that he had been instructed by general manager Jim Finks during the off-season to study film and decode the Packers' signal system for relaying plays to the quarterback. Tobin, who had been in the Packers' front office during the Devine years, had been fired by Starr in 1975 as part of a wholesale housecleaning. "I went at it like a tiger does good meat," Tobin said at the time. "We wanted 100 points," defensive end Dan Hampton said. "It couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of pricks."
  • Bears 23, Packers 7 (October 21, 1985) – The world was introduced to rookie defensive lineman William "The Refrigerator" Perry on Monday Night Football.[16] In goal line situations, Bears head coach Mike Ditka used Perry, who weighed roughly 300 lbs. in the fullback position. Twice, Perry led the way for Bears legend Walter Payton on two- and one-yard touchdown runs. In the second quarter, "the Fridge" was given the ball and plunged into the end zone for one of the heaviest touchdowns in NFL history. The Bears won 23–7, and "The Fridge" was born.
  • Bears 16, Packers 10 (November 10, 1985) – Before the game, the Packers placed horse manure in the Bears locker room.[16] Two weeks after the Monday Night Game, tempers reached a boiling point in the rivalry. Packers cornerback Mark Lee was ejected after he and Bears running back Walter Payton went flying over a bench in the first quarter.[17] A few minutes later, Packers safety Ken Stills was flagged for leveling Matt Suhey, Payton's backfield mate, well after the whistle.
  • Bears 12, Packers 10 (November 23, 1986) – In Week 12 of the 1986 season Green Bay defensive tackle Charles Martin wore a towel with a hit list of specific Bears numbers written on it, such as No. 34 Walter Payton, No. 9 Jim McMahon, and others.[18] Following a McMahon interception Martin came up from behind and body slammed him to the turf,[17] separating McMahon's shoulder, ending the quarterback's season. Martin would be suspended for two games, at the time the longest suspension in NFL history.[19]
  • Packers 14, Bears 13 (November 5, 1989) – This would become known as the Instant Replay Game.[20] Packers quarterback Don Majkowski led the Packers to a comeback with an apparent game-winning touchdown pass to wide receiver Sterling Sharpe. Initially the play was called a touchdown, but line judge Jim Quirk had called a penalty on Majkowski for being beyond the line of scrimmage when he threw the pass. A nervous and tense crowd at Lambeau Field waited as the call went up to the instant replay official. Several minutes later, the call came down and the touchdown was awarded as recorded by instant replay, providing the Packers their first victory over the Bears since 1984. This led to a change in the "illegal forward pass" rule which defined when to consider a passer past the line of scrimmage.[citation needed] The rule formerly was judged by the position of the ball instead of the passer's feet. Bears coach Mike Ditka ordered that an asterisk be placed next to the result in all team publications.

1990s[edit]

  • Packers 33, Bears 6 (October 31, 1994) - Playing with a severely bruised hip in a driving rainstorm at Soldier Field on Halloween Night, Brett Favre rushes for a career-high 58 yards – including a 36-yard touchdown in the second quarter when he leaped over a Bears defender.[21] After the game Favre said "Maybe Gale Sayers (who had his number retired that night along with Dick Butkus) got excited about that one,".[22] With a win in that game, Green Bay began a ten-game winning streak against the Bears as Favre was considered a "Bear-killer"[23] by members of the Chicago Bears media and fans alike.[24] This game marked the beginning of two streaks in the series. The Packers would win ten consecutive games in the series (the longest between the two clubs) and also eleven consecutive away games – a streak that would not end until the 2005 season.[25]
  • Packers 27, Bears 24 (September 11, 1995) - Brett Favre throws a 99-yard touchdown pass to Robert Brooks – one of only 13 times in NFL history a 99-yard TD pass has ever been completed.[21] Green Bay stormed to a 27–7 lead and had 431 yards on offense compared to Chicago's 243, Although Chicago scored 17 unanswered at the end, they came up just sort as time expired. The game was featured nationally on Monday Night Football.[26]
  • Packers 35, Bears 28 (November 12, 1995) - Coming into this much-anticipated matchup, first place in the NFC Central division was on the line. A victory would give the Packers the same record as the Bears (6–4) and would mean a series sweep, giving Green Bay the head-to-head tie-breaker should the teams be tied at season's end. Brett Favre had a badly sprained ankle, which kept his status for the game uncertain. He had not been able to practice all week until the Friday prior to the game. Not only did Favre start, but he had his best game of the season up to that point. He completed 25 of 33 passes for 336 yards and a career-high five touchdowns. Bears QB Erik Kramer also had a solid game, going 23 of 38 for 318 yards, two touchdowns, and one interception. The teams combined for 800 yards of offense. The game was not decided until Kramer threw an incomplete pass in the Packers' end zone on the final play of the game.[27]
  • Packers 24, Bears 23 (October 12, 1997) – In one of the more back-and-forth contests in the rivalry, the Bears got off to a 10–0 lead thanks in part to a rushing touchdown by Raymont Harris in the first quarter before the Packers came back to take a 14–10 halftime lead due to a rushing score by Dorsey Levens. In the third quarter, Erik Kramer ran for a three-yard touchdown to put the Bears back in front, 17–14. However, in the waning seconds of the third quarter, Brett Favre connected with Mark Chmura for a touchdown. The Packers led, 21–17, then extended their lead to 24–17. The Bears marched down the field and scored when Kramer connected with Chris Penn with less than two minutes left. In an "all-or-nothing" maneuver, the Bears went for a two-point conversion. The pass fell incomplete, essentially preserving the win for the Packers.[28]
  • Bears 14, Packers 13 (November 7, 1999) – In their first game since the passing of running back Walter Payton, the Bears defeated the Packers for the first time since 1993 on a blocked field goal by defensive tackle Bryan Robinson.

2000s[edit]

  • Packers 34, Bears 21 (October 7, 2002) – This Monday night contest at Memorial Stadium in Champaign, Illinois, was the only Bears home game in the entire series that was played outside of Chicago. Brett Favre threw an 85-yard TD pass to Donald Driver in the first quarter—the second longest of his career to that point (both against the Bears). At the time, Soldier Field was undergoing a major renovation; the renovated stadium would later reopen in 2003 between the Bears and Packers.[29]
  • Bears 26, Packers 0 (September 10, 2006) – In the opening week of the season, the Bears handed Brett Favre his first shutout in his 16-year career, winning 26–0 in Green Bay. The Bears' offense, criticized for being conservative, opened the game with a 49-yard touchdown pass from Rex Grossman to Bernard Berrian. This also marked the first game in which the Bears' Devin Hester returned a punt for a touchdown.[30]
  • Bears 20, Packers 17 (December 22, 2008) – In the coldest game in recorded Bears history, with a temperature at kickoff of 2 degrees and −13 degrees with wind chill, the Packers traveled to Soldier Field on a Monday night, where a victory against the Bears would have ended their playoff hopes. The Bears had to rally from a 14–3 score at the half. The Bears were able to score after a turnover on a Packers punt return. The Packers were on the verge of finishing a game-winning drive when Mason Crosby's field goal attempt was blocked by Alex Brown, pushing the game to overtime. The Bears took the first possession in overtime and won the game on a 38-yard field goal by Robbie Gould.

2010s[edit]

  • Packers 21, Bears 14 (January 23, 2011, NFC Championship Game) – This was the first time the two teams had met in the playoffs since 1941. The Green Bay Packers started off strong with an early 14–0 lead on an Aaron Rodgers rushing TD. Bears' quarterback, Jay Cutler, was injured late in the second quarter, and was unable to continue. After Bears' quarterback Todd Collins proved ineffective, going 0 for 4 on two drives, the Bears brought in Caleb Hanie, who scored a touchdown to make it 14–7. On the very next Bears drive, however, Hanie would be intercepted by B.J. Raji, who took it to the endzone to make it 21–7 late in the game. The Bears would answer with another TD. With one more drive to tie the game, Hanie threw his second interception, this time to Sam Shields to end the game and send Green Bay to the Super Bowl.[31] The Packers went on to win Super Bowl XLV.[32]
  • Bears 27, Packers 20 (November 4, 2013) – Heading into this Monday Night match-up at Lambeau Field, Bears' quarterback Jay Cutler was benched with a groin injury. Thus, Josh McCown, the backup quarterback of the Bears who had played in Lambeau against the Packers on Christmas Day in 2011, played in Cutler's stead. In the first drive of the game, Packers' quarterback Aaron Rodgers was sacked by Shea McClellin, which fractured Rodgers' left collarbone and sent him out of the game. McCown threw for 272 yards and two touchdowns, and no interceptions. Seneca Wallace, the backup quarterback for the Packers, threw for 114 yards and no touchdowns, with one interception. The Bears won the game 27-20 to end a six-game skid to the Packers and beat them for the first time in Lambeau Field since 2007. Aaron Rodgers would be out for 7 weeks, eventually returning in Week 17 against the Bears for the NFC North title.
  • Packers 33, Bears 28 (December 29, 2013) – In a game with the NFC North Championship and the No.4 seed in the playoffs on the line, the Packers faced off against the Bears with quarterback Aaron Rodgers in his first start since their last meeting in early November, the game in which he was injured. The game was notable for a Rodgers fumble to touchdown that occurred when most players from both teams believed the play to be an incomplete pass. The game also showcased in the second half an offensive shootout, including Bears quarterback Jay Cutler throwing for two touchdowns. However, the Packers ended their last drive converting on 4th down three times, most notably in a long 4th and 8 completion to Randall Cobb for a touchdown that would seal the game and deliver Green Bay its 3rd consecutive NFC North title. While the Bears missed the playoffs with an 8-8 record, the Packers lost in the first round of the playoffs to the San Francisco 49ers, finishing their season with an 8-8-1 record.

Playoffs[edit]

The Bears and Packers have made it to the playoffs in the same year only four times.

  • 1941 The Bears would go on to win the championship early on in the rivalry. This was also the only playoff game in which the two teams had played against each other until the NFC Championship game of the 2010 season.
  • 1994 Both teams won first round games only to be knocked out in the second round games, seeing the 49ers go on to win the Super Bowl.
  • 2001 The Bears had a first round bye but the Packers were the only one of the two teams to win a playoff game this year. The Packers had also given the Bears 2 of their 3 regular season losses that season. The Bears were knocked out at home by the Philadelphia Eagles while the Packers lost to the eventual Super Bowl runner-up St. Louis Rams.
  • 2010 The two teams met on the last day of the season in what was a must-win for Green Bay. The Packers won 10–3 to capture the last wild card spot, while the Bears had already secured a first-round bye. Green Bay clinched a trip to the NFC Championship by virtue of a 21–16 win over Philadelphia in the Wild Card round and then defeating Atlanta, 48–21, in a divisional playoff. The Bears defeated Seattle in the other divisional playoff, 35–24. Both teams advanced to the NFC Championship game, only their second playoff game against each other. Many fans of both teams describe the game as the biggest in the history of the rivalry, with a trip to the Super Bowl on the line. The Packers would ultimately prevail 21–14[31] and go on to beat the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl XLV.[32]

Statistics and records[edit]

As of December 30, 2013, there have been 188 games between the two teams—most in NFL history—since their first league game in 1921, of which the Bears have won 93 and the Packers 89.[33][34] The largest margin of victory was a 61–7 Bears win on December 7, 1980. The longest winning streak is held by the Packers at 10 games from 1994–1998. After beating the Bears four times in 2011, the Packers became only the second team in NFL history to defeat the same opponent four times in one calendar year (the Los Angeles Raiders defeated the Denver Broncos four times in 1994).[35]

Club success[edit]

As of 2011, the Bears and Packers are the NFL's two most successful franchises. The two clubs have won a combined 22 championships in the league's 92-year history.

Team NFL Titles[36] Conference Titles Divisional Titles[37] Wild Card Berths Playoff Appearances NFL Title Game Appearances[38] Super Bowl Appearances[39] All-time Record
Chicago Bears 9 4 18 4 26[40] 10 2 739–542–42
Green Bay Packers 13 9 15 6 29 10 5 708–542–36
Combined 22 13 33 10 55 20 7 1447–1084–78
Table correct as of May 5, 2014

Summary of results[edit]

Bears wins Ties Packers wins Bears points Packers points
Regular season 92 6 88 3,161 3,108
Postseason 1 1 47 35
Total 93 6 89 3,208 3,143

Updated December 29, 2013.

Individual game results[edit]

This is a list of results from all of the meetings between the Chicago Bears and Green Bay Packers from their first meeting in 1921 to the present.

Bears victory Packers victory Tied Game Post Season Meeting

1920s (Bears 7–6–3)[edit]

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location
1921 Sunday, November 27 Chicago Staleys 20–0 Green Bay Packers 7,000 Chicago, Illinois
1923 Sunday, October 14 Chicago Bears 3–0 Green Bay Packers 4,451 Green Bay, Wisconsin
1924 Sunday, November 23 Chicago Bears 3–0 Green Bay Packers 6,000 Chicago
1925 Sunday, September 27 Green Bay Packers 14–10 Chicago Bears 5,389 Green Bay
1925 Sunday, November 22 Chicago Bears 21–0 Green Bay Packers 6,898 Chicago
1926 Sunday, September 26 6–6 7,000 Green Bay
1926 Sunday, November 21 Chicago Bears 19–13 Green Bay Packers 7,500 Chicago
1926 Sunday, December 19 3–3 10,000 Chicago
1927 Sunday, October 2 Chicago Bears 7–6 Green Bay Packers 5,500 Green Bay
1927 Sunday, November 20 Chicago Bears 14–6 Green Bay Packers 6,000 Chicago
1928 Sunday, September 30 12–12 8,500 Green Bay
1928 Sunday, October 21 Green Bay Packers 16–6 Chicago Bears 15,000 Chicago
1928 Sunday, December 9 Green Bay Packers 6–0 Chicago Bears 14,000 Chicago
1929 Sunday, September 29 Green Bay Packers 23–0 Chicago Bears 13,000 Green Bay
1929 Sunday, November 10 Green Bay Packers 14–0 Chicago Bears 13,000 Chicago
1929 Sunday, December 8 Green Bay Packers 25–0 Chicago Bears 6,000 Chicago

1930s (Bears 12–11–1)[edit]

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location
1930 Sunday, September 28 Green Bay Packers 7–0 Chicago Bears 10,000 Green Bay
1930 Sunday, November 9 Green Bay Packers 13–12 Chicago Bears 22,000 Chicago
1930 Sunday, December 7 Chicago Bears 21–0 Green Bay Packers 20,000 Chicago
1931 Sunday, September 27 Green Bay Packers 7–0 Chicago Bears 13,500 Green Bay
1931 Sunday, November 1 Green Bay Packers 6–2 Chicago Bears 30,000 Chicago
1931 Sunday, December 6 Chicago Bears 7–6 Green Bay Packers 18,000 Chicago
1932 Sunday, September 25 0–0 13,000 Green Bay
1932 Sunday, October 16 Green Bay Packers 2–0 Chicago Bears 18,000 Chicago
1932 Sunday, December 11 Chicago Bears 9–0 Green Bay Packers 5,000 Chicago
1933 Sunday, September 24 Chicago Bears 14–7 Green Bay Packers 12,000 Green Bay
1933 Sunday, October 22 Chicago Bears 10–7 Green Bay Packers 21,000 Chicago
1933 Sunday, December 10 Chicago Bears 7–6 Green Bay Packers 7,000 Chicago
1934 Sunday, September 23 Chicago Bears 24–10 Green Bay Packers 13,500 Green Bay
1934 Sunday, October 28 Chicago Bears 27–14 Green Bay Packers 18,000 Chicago
1935 Sunday, September 23 Green Bay Packers 7–0 Chicago Bears 13,600 Green Bay
1935 Sunday, October 27 Green Bay Packers 17–14 Chicago Bears 29,386 Chicago
1936 Sunday, September 23 Chicago Bears 30–3 Green Bay Packers 14,312 Green Bay
1936 Sunday, November 1 Green Bay Packers 21–10 Chicago Bears 31,346 Chicago
1937 Sunday, September 19 Chicago Bears 14–2 Green Bay Packers 16,658 Green Bay
1937 Sunday, November 1 Green Bay Packers 24–14 Chicago Bears 44,977 Chicago
1938 Sunday, September 18 Chicago Bears 2–0 Green Bay Packers 15,172 Green Bay
1938 Sunday, November 6 Green Bay Packers 24–17 Chicago Bears 40,208 Chicago
1939 Sunday, September 24 Green Bay Packers 21–16 Chicago Bears 19,192 Green Bay
1939 Sunday, November 5 Chicago Bears 24–17 Green Bay Packers 40,537 Chicago

1940s (Bears 16–4–1)[edit]

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location
1940 Sunday, September 22 Chicago Bears 41–10 Green Bay Packers 22,557 Green Bay
1940 Sunday, November 3 Chicago Bears 14–7 Green Bay Packers 45,434 Chicago
1941 Sunday, September 28 Chicago Bears 25–17 Green Bay Packers 24,876 Green Bay
1941 Sunday, November 2 Green Bay Packers 16–14 Chicago Bears 46,484 Chicago
1941 Sunday, December 14* Chicago Bears 33–14 Green Bay Packers 43,425 Chicago
1942 Sunday, September 27 Chicago Bears 44–28 Green Bay Packers 20,007 Green Bay
1942 Sunday, November 15 Chicago Bears 38–7 Green Bay Packers 42,787 Chicago
1943 Sunday, September 26 21–21 23,675 Green Bay
1943 Sunday, November 7 Chicago Bears 21–7 Green Bay Packers 43,425 Chicago
1944 Sunday, September 24 Green Bay Packers 42–28 Chicago Bears 24,362 Green Bay
1944 Sunday, November 5 Chicago Bears 21–0 Green Bay Packers 45,553 Chicago
1945 Sunday, September 30 Green Bay Packers 31–21 Chicago Bears 24,525 Green Bay
1945 Sunday, November 4 Chicago Bears 28–24 Green Bay Packers 45,527 Chicago
1946 Sunday, September 29 Chicago Bears 30–7 Green Bay Packers 25,049 Green Bay
1946 Sunday, November 3 Chicago Bears 10–7 Green Bay Packers 46,321 Chicago
1947 Sunday, September 28 Green Bay Packers 29–20 Chicago Bears 25,461 Green Bay
1947 Sunday, November 9 Chicago Bears 20–17 Green Bay Packers 46,112 Chicago
1948 Sunday, September 26 Chicago Bears 45–7 Green Bay Packers 25,546 Green Bay
1948 Sunday, November 14 Chicago Bears 7–6 Green Bay Packers 48,113 Chicago
1949 Sunday, September 25 Chicago Bears 17–0 Green Bay Packers 25,571 Green Bay
1949 Sunday, November 6 Chicago Bears 24–3 Green Bay Packers 47,218 Chicago

1950s (Bears 14–5–1)[edit]

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location
1950 Sunday, October 1 Green Bay Packers 31–21 Chicago Bears 24,893 Green Bay
1950 Sunday, October 15 Chicago Bears 28–14 Green Bay Packers 51,065 Chicago
1951 Sunday, September 30 Chicago Bears 31–20 Green Bay Packers 24,666 Green Bay
1951 Sunday, November 18 Chicago Bears 24–13 Green Bay Packers 36,771 Chicago
1952 Sunday, September 28 Chicago Bears 24–14 Green Bay Packers 24,656 Green Bay
1952 Sunday, November 9 Green Bay Packers 41–28 Chicago Bears 41,751 Chicago
1953 Sunday, October 4 Chicago Bears 17–13 Green Bay Packers 24,835 Green Bay
1953 Sunday, November 8 21–21 39,889 Chicago
1954 Sunday, October 3 Chicago Bears 10–3 Green Bay Packers 24,414 Green Bay
1954 Sunday, November 7 Chicago Bears 28–23 Green Bay Packers 47,038 Chicago
1955 Sunday, October 2 Green Bay Packers 24–3 Chicago Bears 24,662 Green Bay
1955 Sunday, November 6 Chicago Bears 52–31 Green Bay Packers 48,890 Chicago
1956 Sunday, October 7 Chicago Bears 37–21 Green Bay Packers 24,668 Green Bay
1956 Sunday, November 11 Chicago Bears 38–14 Green Bay Packers 49,172 Chicago
1957 Sunday, September 29 Green Bay Packers 21–17 Chicago Bears 32,132 Green Bay
1957 Sunday, November 10 Chicago Bears 21–14 Green Bay Packers 47,153 Chicago
1958 Sunday, September 28 Chicago Bears 34–20 Green Bay Packers 32,150 Green Bay
1958 Sunday, November 9 Chicago Bears 24–10 Green Bay Packers 48,424 Chicago
1959 Sunday, September 27 Green Bay Packers 9–6 Chicago Bears 32,150 Green Bay
1959 Sunday, November 8 Chicago Bears 28–17 Green Bay Packers 46,205 Chicago

1960s (Packers 15–5)[edit]

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location
1960 Sunday, September 25 Chicago Bears 17–14 Green Bay Packers 32,150 Green Bay
1960 Sunday, December 4 Green Bay Packers 41–13 Chicago Bears 46,406 Chicago
1961 Sunday, October 1 Green Bay Packers 24–0 Chicago Bears 38,669 Green Bay
1961 Sunday, November 12 Green Bay Packers 31–28 Chicago Bears 49,711 Chicago
1962 Sunday, September 30 Green Bay Packers 49–0 Chicago Bears 38,669 Green Bay
1962 Sunday, November 4 Green Bay Packers 38–7 Chicago Bears 48,753 Chicago
1963 Sunday, September 15 Chicago Bears 10–3 Green Bay Packers 42,327 Green Bay
1963 Sunday, November 17 Chicago Bears 26–7 Green Bay Packers 49,166 Chicago
1964 Sunday, September 13 Green Bay Packers 23–12 Chicago Bears 42,327 Green Bay
1964 Saturday, December 5 Green Bay Packers 17–3 Chicago Bears 43,636 Chicago
1965 Sunday, October 3 Green Bay Packers 23–14 Chicago Bears 50,852 Green Bay
1965 Sunday, October 31 Chicago Bears 31–10 Green Bay Packers 45,664 Chicago
1966 Sunday, October 16 Green Bay Packers 17–0 Chicago Bears 48,573 Chicago
1966 Sunday, November 20 Green Bay Packers 13–6 Chicago Bears 50,861 Green Bay
1967 Sunday, September 24 Green Bay Packers 13–10 Chicago Bears 50,861 Green Bay
1967 Sunday, November 26 Green Bay Packers 17–13 Chicago Bears 47,513 Chicago
1968 Sunday, November 3 Chicago Bears 13–10 Green Bay Packers 50,861 Green Bay
1968 Sunday, December 15 Green Bay Packers 28–27 Chicago Bears 46,435 Chicago
1969 Sunday, September 21 Green Bay Packers 17–0 Chicago Bears 50,861 Green Bay
1969 Sunday, December 14 Green Bay Packers 21–3 Chicago Bears 45,216 Chicago

1970s (Bears 11-9)[edit]

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location
1970 Sunday, November 15 Green Bay Packers 20–19 Chicago Bears 56,263 Green Bay
1970 Sunday, December 13 Chicago Bears 35–17 Green Bay Packers 44,957 Chicago
1971 Sunday, November 17 Green Bay Packers 17–14 Chicago Bears 55,049 Chicago
1971 Sunday, December 12 Green Bay Packers 31–10 Chicago Bears 56,263 Green Bay
1972 Sunday, October 8 Green Bay Packers 20–17 Chicago Bears 56,263 Green Bay
1972 Sunday, November 12 Green Bay Packers 23–17 Chicago Bears 55,701 Chicago
1973 Sunday, November 4 Chicago Bears 31–17 Green Bay Packers 56,267 Green Bay
1973 Sunday, December 16 Green Bay Packers 21–0 Chicago Bears 55,701 Chicago
1974 Monday, October 21 Chicago Bears 10–9 Green Bay Packers 55,453 Chicago
1974 Sunday, November 10 Green Bay Packers 20–3 Chicago Bears 48,273 Milwaukee, Wisconsin
1975 Sunday, November 9 Chicago Bears 27–14 Green Bay Packers 57,455 Chicago
1975 Sunday, November 30 Green Bay Packers 28–7 Chicago Bears 56,267 Green Bay
1976 Sunday, November 14 Chicago Bears 24–13 Green Bay Packers 57,359 Chicago
1976 Sunday, November 28 Chicago Bears 16–10 Green Bay Packers 56,267 Green Bay
1977 Sunday, October 30 Chicago Bears 26–0 Green Bay Packers 56,267 Green Bay
1977 Sunday, December 11 Chicago Bears 21–10 Green Bay Packers 57,359 Chicago
1978 Sunday, October 8 Green Bay Packers 24–14 Chicago Bears 56,267 Green Bay
1978 Sunday, December 10 Chicago Bears 14–0 Green Bay Packers 57,359 Chicago
1979 Sunday, September 2 Chicago Bears 6–3 Green Bay Packers 56,515 Chicago
1979 Sunday, December 9 Chicago Bears 15–14 Green Bay Packers 54,207 Green Bay

1980s (Bears 11–7)[edit]

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location
1980 Sunday, September 7 Green Bay Packers 12–6 Chicago Bears 54,381 Green Bay
1980 Sunday, December 7 Chicago Bears 61–7 Green Bay Packers 57,176 Chicago
1981 Sunday, September 6 Green Bay Packers 16–9 Chicago Bears 62,411 Chicago
1981 Sunday, November 15 Green Bay Packers 21–17 Chicago Bears 55,338 Green Bay
1983 Sunday, December 4 Green Bay Packers 31–28 Chicago Bears 51,147 Green Bay
1983 Sunday, December 18 Chicago Bears 23–21 Green Bay Packers 35,807 Chicago
1984 Sunday, September 16 Chicago Bears 9–7 Green Bay Packers 55,942 Green Bay
1984 Sunday, December 9 Green Bay Packers 20–14 Chicago Bears 59,374 Chicago
1985 Monday, October 21 Chicago Bears 23–7 Green Bay Packers 65,095 Chicago
1985 Sunday, November 3 Chicago Bears 16–10 Green Bay Packers 56,895 Green Bay
1986 Monday, September 22 Chicago Bears 25–12 Green Bay Packers 55,527 Green Bay
1986 Sunday, November 23 Chicago Bears 12–10 Green Bay Packers 59,291 Chicago
1987 Sunday, November 8 Chicago Bears 26–24 Green Bay Packers 53,320 Green Bay
1987 Sunday, November 29 Chicago Bears 23–10 Green Bay Packers 61,638 Chicago
1988 Sunday, September 25 Chicago Bears 24–6 Green Bay Packers 56,492 Green Bay
1988 Sunday, November 27 Chicago Bears 16–0 Green Bay Packers 62,026 Chicago
1989 Sunday, November 5 Green Bay Packers 14–13 Chicago Bears 56,556 Green Bay
1989 Sunday, December 17 Green Bay Packers 40–28 Chicago Bears 44,781 Chicago

1990s (Packers 13–7)[edit]

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location
1990 Sunday, September 16 Chicago Bears 31–13 Green Bay Packers 58,938 Green Bay
1990 Sunday, October 7 Chicago Bears 27–13 Green Bay Packers 59,929 Chicago
1991 Thursday, October 17 Chicago Bears 10–0 Green Bay Packers 58,435 Green Bay
1991 Sunday, December 8 Chicago Bears 27–13 Green Bay Packers 62,353 Chicago
1992 Sunday, October 25 Chicago Bears 30–10 Green Bay Packers 59,435 Green Bay
1992 Sunday, November 22 Green Bay Packers 17–3 Chicago Bears 56,170 Chicago
1993 Sunday, October 31 Green Bay Packers 17–3 Chicago Bears 58,945 Green Bay
1993 Sunday, December 5 Chicago Bears 30–17 Green Bay Packers 62,236 Chicago
1994 Monday, October 31 Green Bay Packers 33–6 Chicago Bears 47,381 Chicago
1994 Sunday, December 11 Green Bay Packers 40–3 Chicago Bears 57,927 Green Bay
1995 Monday, September 11 Green Bay Packers 27–24 Chicago Bears 64,855 Chicago
1995 Sunday, November 12 Green Bay Packers 35–28 Chicago Bears 59,996 Green Bay
1996 Sunday, October 6 Green Bay Packers 37–6 Chicago Bears 65,480 Chicago
1996 Sunday, December 1 Green Bay Packers 28–17 Chicago Bears 59,682 Green Bay
1997 Monday, September 1 Green Bay Packers 38–24 Chicago Bears 60,766 Green Bay
1997 Sunday, October 12 Green Bay Packers 24–23 Chicago Bears 62,212 Chicago
1998 Sunday, December 13 Green Bay Packers 26–20 Chicago Bears 59,813 Green Bay
1998 Sunday, December 27 Green Bay Packers 16–13 Chicago Bears 58,393 Chicago
1999 Sunday, November 7 Chicago Bears 14–13 Green Bay Packers 59,867 Green Bay
1999 Sunday, December 5 Green Bay Packers 35–19 Chicago Bears 66,944 Chicago

2000s (Packers 12–8)[edit]

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location
2000 Sunday, October 1 Chicago Bears 27–24 Green Bay Packers 59,869 Green Bay
2000 Sunday, December 3 Green Bay Packers 28–6 Chicago Bears 66,994 Chicago
2001 Sunday, November 11 Green Bay Packers 20–12 Chicago Bears 66,944 Chicago
2001 Sunday, December 9 Green Bay Packers 17–7 Chicago Bears 59,869 Green Bay
2002 Monday, October 7 Green Bay Packers 34–21 Chicago Bears 63,226 Champaign, Illinois
2002 Sunday, December 1 Green Bay Packers 30–20 Chicago Bears 64,196 Green Bay
2003 Monday, September 29 Green Bay Packers 38–23 Chicago Bears 61,500 Chicago
2003 Sunday, December 7 Green Bay Packers 34–21 Chicago Bears 70,458 Green Bay
2004 Sunday, September 19 Chicago Bears 21–10 Green Bay Packers 70,688 Green Bay
2005 Sunday, January 2 Green Bay Packers 31–14 Chicago Bears 62,197 Chicago
2005 Sunday, December 4 Chicago Bears 19–7 Green Bay Packers 62,177 Chicago
2005 Sunday, December 25 Chicago Bears 24–17 Green Bay Packers 69,757 Green Bay
2006 Sunday, September 10 Chicago Bears 26–0 Green Bay Packers 70,918 Green Bay
2006 Sunday, December 31 Green Bay Packers 26–7 Chicago Bears 62,287 Chicago
2007 Sunday, October 7 Chicago Bears 27–20 Green Bay Packers 70,904 Green Bay
2007 Sunday, December 23 Chicago Bears 35–7 Green Bay Packers 62,272 Chicago
2008 Sunday, November 16 Green Bay Packers 37–3 Chicago Bears 71,040 Green Bay
2008 Monday, December 22 Chicago Bears 20–17 Green Bay Packers 62,151 Chicago
2009 Sunday, September 13 Green Bay Packers 21–15 Chicago Bears 70,920 Green Bay
2009 Sunday, December 13 Green Bay Packers 21–14 Chicago Bears 62,214 Chicago

2010s (Packers 7–2)[edit]

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location
2010 Monday, September 27 Chicago Bears 20–17 Green Bay Packers 62,179 Chicago
2011 Sunday, January 2 Green Bay Packers 10–3 Chicago Bears 70,833 Green Bay
2011 Sunday, January 23* Green Bay Packers 21–14 Chicago Bears 62,377 Chicago
2011 Sunday, September 25 Green Bay Packers 27–17 Chicago Bears 62,339 Chicago
2011 Sunday, December 25 Green Bay Packers 35–21 Chicago Bears 70,574 Green Bay
2012 Thursday, September 13 Green Bay Packers 23–10 Chicago Bears 70,543 Green Bay
2012 Sunday, December 16 Green Bay Packers 21–13 Chicago Bears 62,534 Chicago
2013 Monday, November 4 Chicago Bears 27–20 Green Bay Packers 78,122 Green Bay
2013 Sunday, December 29 Green Bay Packers 33–28 Chicago Bears 62,708 Chicago
2014 Sunday, September 28 Chicago
2014 Sunday, November 9 Green Bay

* – Denotes a Playoff Game

See also[edit]

Other rivalries involving the two teams

References[edit]

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  4. ^ "1929 Green Bay Packers". Pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05. 
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  6. ^ "1930 Green Bay Packers". Pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05. 
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  14. ^ Taylor, Roy (December 7, 1980). "1980 Chicago Bears". Bearshistory.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05. 
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  18. ^ Haugh, David (February 1, 2005). "To Bears fans, Charles Martin will always be recalled for the body slam that ended Jim McMahon's season in 1986. But there was more to the man they buried Monday. – Chicago Tribune". Articles.chicagotribune.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05. 
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  36. ^ Includes pre and post merger
  37. ^ All NFL Divisional titles between 1933 and 2007
  38. ^ All NFL Championship Games between 1933 and 1969
  39. ^ All Super Bowls from I through XLIV (1966–2009)
  40. ^ Includes the Unofficial 1932 NFL Championship.