Beatrix Hoyt

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Beatrix Hoyt (July 5, 1880 - August 14, 1963) was an American amateur golfer.[1] Hoyt is the third youngest golfer to ever win the U.S. Women's Amateur, and is one of only five competitors to win the championship three consecutive times.[2][3]

She was born in Westchester County, New York, the granddaughter of Salmon P. Chase (1808-1873), the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under President Lincoln and later, Chief Justice of the United States.[4]

A member of the Shinnecock Hills Golf Club in Southampton, New York, which encouraged juniors and females to play the game, in 1896, at the age of sixteen, and after only two years of playing golf, Beatrix Hoyt won the United States Women's Amateur Golf Championship, making her the youngest woman to win until Laura Baugh's victory in 1971.[5][6] She went on to win the championship the following two years as well.[7] She was also the medalist for shooting the lowest score in the tournament's qualifying round, something she would accomplish for five straight years. 1896 was the second edition of the championship and the first year that the Robert Cox Cup was awarded to the winner. With partner William Sands, in November 1897, she won the mixed foursome championship at Westchester Country Club.[8] At age 19, she retired from competitive golf after losing to Margaret Curtis in the semi-final round at the 1900 tournament, ultimately pursuing a career in sculpture and landscape painting.[9][10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Through the Green — February 1957. USGA Journal and Turf Management. Retrieved October 9, 2009.
  2. ^ Records — USGA. Retrieved OCtober 9, 2009.
  3. ^ Sports Biographies — Hickok Sports. Retrieved October 9, 2009.
  4. ^ U.S. Women's Amateur Championship — Brent Kelley, About.com. Retrieved October 9, 2009.
  5. ^ Hudson, David L. Women in Golf: The Players, the History, and the Future of the Sport. Greenwood Publishing Group, 2007. Pages 11-12. Retrieved October 9, 2009, from Google Books.
  6. ^ Sports Biographies — Hickok Sports. Retrieved October 9, 2009.
  7. ^ Golf Queen Dethroned — October 12, 1899. New York Times, Archives. Retrieved October 9, 2009.
  8. ^ Hudson, David L. Women in Golf: The Players, the History, and the Future of the Sport. Greenwood Publishing Group, 2007. Pages 11-12. Retrieved October 9, 2009, from Google Books.
  9. ^ Sports Biographies — Hickok Sports. Retrieved October 9, 2009.
  10. ^ A Link to Scotland — Frank Hannigan. August 22, 1977. Sports Illustrated. Retrieved October 9, 2009.