Beaumontia

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Beaumontia
Beaumontia grandiflora (1).jpg
Beaumontia grandiflora
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Gentianales
Family: Apocynaceae
Genus: Beaumontia
Species

See text.

Synonyms[1]
  • Muantum Pichon

Beaumontia A small genus of evergreen woody vines in the East Indies and Asia. This genus consists of 9 species of often rampant climbers and vines, and belongs to the oleander or dogbane (Apocynaceae) family.

Description[edit]

The Beaumontia plants are evergreen, though in subtropical gardens Beaumontia grandiflora loses many leaves in winter. Leaves are large, smooth and opposite with sticky white sap.

The large white fragrant flowers are borne in corymbs terminal and in the leaf axils. The calyx is 5-lobed and the corolla is dark funnel-or bell-shaped with 5 lobes. Stamens are attached near the base of the corolla tube and have slender filaments with arrow-shaped anthers. They are very showy when in full bloom and are regarded as among the most outstanding vines of the world.

The fruits comprises a pair of thick woody follicles.

Cultivation

The Beaumontia species are cultivated as ornamental plants, with Beaumontia grandiflora widely grown by the nursery trade. They prefer good soil, adequate water and hot moist conditions. They are found planted and trained as vines in subtropical climate gardens, such as in Southern California.

They are propagated from seed or half-hardened cuttings taken with a heel, rooted in sandy soil under mist.

Species[edit]

Beaumontia brevituba
Beaumontia grandiflora
Beaumontia jerdoniana
Beaumontia khasiana
Beaumontia murtonii Craib syn Beaumontia fragrans
Beaumontia wallich

References[edit]

  1. ^ "World Checklist of Selected Plant Families". Retrieved May 21, 2014. 
  • Ellison, Don (1999) Cultivated Plants of the World. London: New Holland (1st ed.: Brisbane: Flora Publications International, 1995)
  • Graf, Alfred Byrd (1986) Tropica: color cyclopedia of exotic plants and trees for warm-region

horticulture—in cool climate the summer garden or sheltered indoors; 3rd ed. East Rutherford, N.J.: Roehrs Co

External links[edit]

 
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