Beausejour, Manitoba

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Town of Beausejour
Town of Beausejour is located in Manitoba
Town of Beausejour
Town of Beausejour
Location of Beausejour in Manitoba
Coordinates: 50°03′44″N 96°30′58″W / 50.06222°N 96.51611°W / 50.06222; -96.51611Coordinates: 50°03′44″N 96°30′58″W / 50.06222°N 96.51611°W / 50.06222; -96.51611
Country Canada
Province Manitoba
Region Eastman
Rural Municipality Brokenhead
Established 1874
Incorporated 1908 (village)
1912 (town)
Government
 • Mayor Brad Saluk
 • Governing Body Town Council
 • MP (Selkirk-Interlake) James Bezan (CPC)
 • MLA
(Lac du Bonnet)
Wayne Ewasko (PC)
Area
 • Total 5.35 km2 (2.07 sq mi)
Elevation 251.2 m (824 ft)
Population (2011)
 • Total 3,126
 • Density 584.4/km2 (1,514/sq mi)
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Website Town of Beausejour

Beausejour is a town in the Canadian province of Manitoba, located in the Rural Municipality of Brokenhead. It is 46 kilometres northeast of Winnipeg, just west of the Canadian Shield and Whiteshell Provincial Park. The French name Beauséjour [beau + séjour] means "beautiful place to live (abide)".

History[edit]

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1911 847 —    
1921 994 +17.4%
1931 1,139 +14.6%
1941 1,161 +1.9%
1951 1,376 +18.5%
1961 1,770 +28.6%
1996 2,712 +53.2%
2001 2,772 +2.2%
2006 2,823 +1.8%
2011 3,126 +10.7%
[1][2][3]

In 1906, the "Manitoba Glass Works" was founded, in a town now known as Beausejour, by Joseph Keilback and his partners. Sustained by a nearby deposit of high quality sand, it was the first glass container factory in Western Canada. Glassblowers from Poland and the United States, supported by local labour, used silica sands to produce bottles for breweries and soft drink companies in Winnipeg. In 1909 it was taken over by a Winnipeg businessman, who expanded production to include jars, medicine bottles, and ink bottles. At its peak, the Manitoba Glass Works employed 350 workers, but because of its inability to compete with Eastern Canadian manufacturers, was purchased in 1913 by a Montreal company and relocated to Redcliff, Alberta. The factory site remains, and was designated as a Provincial Heritage Site (number 41) on 27 September 1989.[4]

In 1912, the Town of Beausejour was incorporated.[5]

It is the birthplace of former Provincial Premier and Governor General Edward Schreyer.[6] Edward Schreyer School is named after him in his honour.

Beausejour was the setting for the 1990 film The Outside Chance of Maximilian Glick, and was largely filmed there.

Economy[edit]

Beausejour's current economy is based on agriculture (grain production) and tourism.[7] Its location as a main access point to the Whiteshell Provincial Park, a popular cottage region and tourist attraction, allows Beausejour to cater to visitor traffic through the area. It also serves as the main commercial centre for farmers and residents of the surrounding areas.

Recreation[edit]

The town is home to the Canadian Power Toboggan Championships, the Double B Agricultural Festival (formerly Double B Rodeo and Country Fair) and the annual Brokenhead River Agricultural Conference. Beausejour is also known for its annual "Shades of the Past" car show on the last Sunday of August. The car show encompasses all of Park Avenue and attracts over 500 classic and special interest vehicles.

Beausejour has also hosted the Manitoba Provincial Finals for the Scott Tournament of Hearts, which was held in the Sun Gro Centre.

Sports[edit]

Beausejour hosted the 2006 Power Smart Manitoba Games. The opening ceremonies were held at the CPTC Racetrack, and the closing ceremonies at the Sun Gro Centre.

Beausejour's hockey teams are known as the Blades. Beausejour's MEHL team is Beausejour Beavers. The Eastman Selects of the Manitoba Midget 'AAA' Hockey League plays in the town. Hockey games are played in the Sun Gro Centre, which also has a curling rink.[8]

Media[edit]

The Beausejour Review published its final issue on 27 June 2013.[9]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Beausejour
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 6.5
(43.7)
20
(68)
18.5
(65.3)
34
(93)
37
(99)
38
(100)
36.7
(98.1)
39
(102)
38
(100)
29.4
(84.9)
22.2
(72)
8.5
(47.3)
39
(102)
Average high °C (°F) −12.8
(9)
−8.2
(17.2)
−0.8
(30.6)
10
(50)
18.9
(66)
23.2
(73.8)
25.7
(78.3)
24.9
(76.8)
18.2
(64.8)
10.4
(50.7)
−0.9
(30.4)
−10.1
(13.8)
8.2
(46.8)
Daily mean °C (°F) −18.5
(−1.3)
−14.2
(6.4)
−6.4
(20.5)
3.8
(38.8)
11.8
(53.2)
16.7
(62.1)
19.1
(66.4)
18
(64)
12.1
(53.8)
5.1
(41.2)
−5.3
(22.5)
−15.4
(4.3)
2.2
(36)
Average low °C (°F) −24
(−11)
−20.1
(−4.2)
−11.9
(10.6)
−2.5
(27.5)
4.5
(40.1)
10.1
(50.2)
12.4
(54.3)
11.1
(52)
5.9
(42.6)
−0.2
(31.6)
−9.6
(14.7)
−20.5
(−4.9)
−3.7
(25.3)
Record low °C (°F) −44.5
(−48.1)
−46.7
(−52.1)
−42.2
(−44)
−30.6
(−23.1)
−13.9
(7)
−4.4
(24.1)
0
(32)
−2.5
(27.5)
−8.3
(17.1)
−23
(−9)
−39.5
(−39.1)
−42.5
(−44.5)
−46.7
(−52.1)
Precipitation mm (inches) 25.8
(1.016)
18.6
(0.732)
24.7
(0.972)
31.4
(1.236)
55.6
(2.189)
91.6
(3.606)
70.4
(2.772)
74.8
(2.945)
60.9
(2.398)
45.7
(1.799)
33.3
(1.311)
25.5
(1.004)
558.3
(21.98)
Source: Environment Canada[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1], Censuses 1871-1931
  2. ^ [2], Census 1941-1951
  3. ^ [3], Census 1961
  4. ^ Manitoba Provincial Heritage Sites
  5. ^ Town of Beausejour
  6. ^ "ED Schreyer". University of Manitoba. Retrieved 2010-07-22. 
  7. ^ Town of Beausejour Profile
  8. ^ Sun Gro Centre
  9. ^ Paul, Alexandra (26 June 2013). "Lac du Bonnet, Beausejour papers to cease publication". Winnipeg Free Press. Retrieved 4 July 2013. 
  10. ^ Environment Canada - Canadian Climate Normals 1971-2000—Canadian Climate Normals 1971–2000, accessed 6 April 2011

External links[edit]