Beaver Dam, Wisconsin

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This article is about the city. For the adjacent town, see Beaver Dam (town), Wisconsin.
Beaver Dam
City
Looking east at downtown Beaver Dam
Looking east at downtown Beaver Dam
Beaver Dam is located in Wisconsin
Beaver Dam
Beaver Dam
Location of Beaver Dam in Wisconsin
Coordinates: 43°27′35″N 88°50′9″W / 43.45972°N 88.83583°W / 43.45972; -88.83583Coordinates: 43°27′35″N 88°50′9″W / 43.45972°N 88.83583°W / 43.45972; -88.83583
Country United States of America
State Wisconsin
County Dodge County
Settled 1852
Government
 • Mayor Tom Kennedy (D)
Area[1]
 • City 8.17 sq mi (21.16 km2)
 • Land 6.79 sq mi (17.59 km2)
 • Water 1.38 sq mi (3.57 km2)  16.89%
Population (2010)[2]
 • City 16,214
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 16,291
 • Density 2,387.9/sq mi (922.0/km2)
 • Metro 88,489
Time zone Central

Beaver Dam is a city in Dodge County, Wisconsin, United States, along Beaver Dam Lake and the Beaver Dam River. The population was 16,291 in 2012, making it the largest city in Dodge County. It is the principal city of the Beaver Dam Micropolitan Statistical area. The city is located within the Town of Beaver Dam.

Geography and climate[edit]

Beaver Dam is located at 43°27′35″N 88°50′9″W / 43.45972°N 88.83583°W / 43.45972; -88.83583 (43.459967, −88.836066).[4]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 8.17 square miles (21.16 km2), of which, 6.79 square miles (17.59 km2) is land and 1.38 square miles (3.57 km2) is water.[1]

Since 1996, the average annual snowfall in Beaver Dam has been 63.5 inches (161 cm). The 2007–2008 winter season was the snowiest on record with 119.7 inches (304 cm). [5]

Normal climate[6][edit]

Normal temperatures[edit]

(Official NWS climate station)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
Max °F 23.9 27.1 42.7 56.6 68.9 77.4 81.6 79.7 71.7 59.2 45.7 28.3 55.2
Min °F 7.1 9.5 23.2 36.5 46.7 57.3 60.3 59.6 50.6 39.8 29.5 12.5 36.0

Normal precipitation[edit]

(Official NWS climate station)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
Inch 1.52 1.97 2.86 4.61 3.35 5.76 4.22 4.46 3.00 2.63 2.14 2.51 39.02

Snowfall[edit]

(Official NWS climate station)
Year 1996–
1997
1997–
1998
1998–
1999
1999–
2000
2000–
2001
2001–
2002
2002–
2003
2003–
2004
2004–
2005
2005–
2006
2006–
2007
2007–
2008
2008–
2009
2009–
2010
2010–
2011
2011–
2012
2012–
2013
2013–
2014
Annual Avg. 10 yr Running Avg.
Inch 80.0 60.0 49.5 42.3 62.5 40.7 35.5 30.4 53.3 51.3 61.5 119.7 85.9 64.0 96.3 47.2 97.4 67.5 63.6 74.4

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 16,214 people, 6,819 households, and 4,113 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,387.9 inhabitants per square mile (922.0 /km2). There were 7,326 housing units at an average density of 1,078.9 per square mile (416.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 93.0% White, 0.8% African American, 0.3% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 3.4% from other races, and 1.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.5% of the population.

There were 6,819 households of which 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.1% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 39.7% were non-families. 33.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.95.

The median age in the city was 37.7 years. 25.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.1% were from 25 to 44; 25% were from 45 to 64; and 16.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.4% male and 51.6% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 15,169 people, 6,349 households, and 3,999 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,904.6 people per square mile (1,122.0/km²). There were 6,685 housing units at an average density of 1,280.1 per square mile (494.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.95% White, 0.44% Black or African American, 0.32% Native American, 0.61% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 1.61% from other races, and 1.04% from two or more races. 4.22% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 6,349 households out of which 31.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.0% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.0% were non-families. 31.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the city the population was spread out with 25.0% under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 29.3% from 25 to 44, 21.1% from 45 to 64, and 16.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 93.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,873, and the median income for a family was $46,346. Males had a median income of $33,267 versus $23,513 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,592. About 4.5% of families and 7.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.9% of those under age 18 and 5.5% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

Beaver Dam was first settled by Thomas Mackie and Joseph Goetschius in 1841, and by 1843 had a population of almost 100. The city was named for an old beaver dam located in a stream flowing into Beaver Dam River.[8] The area had also been known as Okwaanim, Chippewa for beaver dam.[9] The community was incorporated as a city on March 18, 1856.[10] That same year the Milwaukee Railroad reached the area, encouraging further growth.

Beaver Dam hosted a World War II POW camp called Camp Beaver Dam in the summer of 1944. The camp held 300 German prisoners of war in a tent city encampment where the Wayland Academy field house now stands.[11]

Beaver Dam is also home to the Williams Free Library, the first public library in the United States to have open stacks.

Education[edit]

School district[edit]

The Beaver Dam Unified School District provides public education in the area.

Primary education[edit]

In Beaver Dam, there are seven public primary schools for K to 5th grades: Jefferson Elementary, Lincoln Elementary, Prairie View Elementary, South Beaver Dam Elementary, Trenton Elementary, Washington Elementary, and Wilson Elementary.

There are two parochial primary schools: St. Katharine Drexel (grades: pre-K to 8th),[12] and St. Stephen's Evangelical Lutheran (grades: K to 8th).[13]

Middle school[edit]

Beaver Dam Middle School is the local public middle school teaching 6th through 8th grades.

Secondary education[edit]

Beaver Dam High School is the local public high school; its mascot is The Golden Beaver. The city is also home to Wayland Academy, a private school. There is also an alternative school, The Don Smith Learning Academy, which is part of the Beaver Dam Unified School District.

Post-secondary education[edit]

The Beaver Dam campus of Moraine Park Technical College is located in the city.

Events[edit]

The following events are held each year in Beaver Dam, WI:[14]

Government[edit]

Beaver Dam is represented by Tom Petri (R) in the United States House of Representatives, and by Ron Johnson (R) and Tammy Baldwin (D) in the United States Senate. Scott L. Fitzgerald (R) represents Beaver Dam in the Wisconsin State Senate, and by Mark Born (R) in the Wisconsin State Assembly.

References in popular media[edit]

Films shot in Beaver Dam[edit]

Films shot about Beaver Dam[edit]

Notable people[edit]

Government[edit]

Professional sports[edit]

Business[edit]

Science, media and the arts[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-18. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-18. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-24. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ Official Observation-National Weather Service Climate Station
  7. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  8. ^ "Beaver Dam [brief history", in Dictionary of Wisconsin History http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/dictionary/index.asp?action=view&term_id=15129
  9. ^ Virgil J. Voegl, Indian Names on Wisconsin's Map. Madison, Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press, 1991. ISBN 0-299-12980-2 p. 142
  10. ^ Private and Local Laws Passed by the Legislature of Wisconsin in 1856, ch. 143. http://books.google.com/books?id=ttY4AAAAIAAJ
  11. ^ Cowley, Betty (February 2002). "Camp Beaver Dam". Stalag Wisconsin: inside WW II prisoner-of-war camps. Badger Books, LLC. p. 77. ISBN 1-878569-83-X. "In trucks under heavy military escore, 300 German PW's arrived on the 17th of June." 
  12. ^ God's Little Miracles Preschool & 4K
  13. ^ http://www.saintstephen.org/school/showpage.cfm?p=135&Title=Grade 8
  14. ^ Beaver Dam Area Chamber of Commerce
  15. ^ "Claire B. Bird". http://genealogytrails.com/. Retrieved 27 November 2013. 
  16. ^ Votesmart.org.-Mark Born
  17. ^ "Samuel D. Burchard". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 27 November 2013. 
  18. ^ "Michael E. Burke". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 27 November 2013. 
  19. ^ 'Wisconsin Blue Book 1876,' Biographical Sketch of Columbus Germain, pg. 464
  20. ^ "Representative Andre Jacque". Wisconsin State Legislature. Retrieved November 16, 2013. 
  21. ^ 'Wisconsin Blue Cook 1940,' Biographical Sketch of William Jones,, pg. 42
  22. ^ "Robert Kastenmeier". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 27 November 2013. 
  23. ^ "Walter J. LaBuy". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 27 November 2013. 
  24. ^ "Silas W. Lamoreaux". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 27 November 2013. 
  25. ^ 'Proceedings of the State Bar Association on Wisconsin 1907,' Wisconsin Bar Association: 1907, Biographical Sketch of Henry W. Lander, pg. 590-593
  26. ^ 'Wisconsin Blue Book 1883,' Biographical Sketch of Edward C. McFetridge. pg. 471
  27. ^ "George F. Merrill". The University of Wisconsin: its history and its alumni, with historical and . Retrieved 27 November 2013. 
  28. ^ "Charles A. Pettibone.". Dodge County, Wisconsin, Past and Present. Retrieved 4 February 2014. 
  29. ^ Biography of John Samuel Rowell
  30. ^ "A. Scott Sloan". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 27 November 2013. 
  31. ^ "John Mellen Thurston". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 27 November 2013. 
  32. ^ "Eric Baldwin". CardPlayer.com. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  33. ^ "Paul Cloyd". Pro-Basketball Reference . Com. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  34. ^ "Ric Flair". Professional Wrestling Hall of Fame. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  35. ^ "Pink Hawley". Pro-Baseball Reference . Com. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  36. ^ "Addie Joss". Pro-Baseball Reference . Com. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  37. ^ "Lyman Linde". Pro-Baseball Reference . Com. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  38. ^ "Doug Lloyd". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  39. ^ "Jason Maas". .argonauts.ca. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  40. ^ "David Maley". National Hockey League. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  41. ^ "Bill Rentmeester". Forty Niners Football Company. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  42. ^ "Elmer Rhenstrom". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  43. ^ "Gil Sterr". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  44. ^ "Barney Traynor". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  45. ^ "Frederick Douglas Underwood". Wisconsin Biographical Dictionary. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  46. ^ "Delia Akeley". HighBeam™ Research, Inc. Retrieved 29 November 2013. 
  47. ^ "Brian Donlevy". .dodgecountyhistory.com. Retrieved 29 November 2013. 
  48. ^ "Lois Ehlert". Wisconsin Center for the Boo. Retrieved 29 November 2013. 
  49. ^ "Zona Gale". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 29 November 2013. 
  50. ^ "Raymond Gallun". Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  51. ^ "Bobby Hatfield". Legacy.com #sthash.8Pj5VXQu.dpuf. Retrieved 29 November 2013. 
  52. ^ "Fred MacMurray". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 29 November 2013. 
  53. ^ "Jon Menick". IMDB. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  54. ^ "Nancy Zieman". wpt2.org. Retrieved 29 November 2013. 

External links[edit]