Bedminster, New Jersey

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Bedminster, New Jersey
Township
Township of Bedminster
Map of Bedminster Township in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County in New Jersey.
Map of Bedminster Township in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Bedminster Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Bedminster Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°40′23″N 74°41′11″W / 40.673089°N 74.686325°W / 40.673089; -74.686325Coordinates: 40°40′23″N 74°41′11″W / 40.673089°N 74.686325°W / 40.673089; -74.686325[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Somerset
Royal charter April 4, 1749
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Named for Bedminster, Bristol
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Steven E. Parker (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator / Clerk Judith A. Sullivan[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 26.301 sq mi (68.119 km2)
 • Land 26.080 sq mi (67.547 km2)
 • Water 0.221 sq mi (0.573 km2)  0.84%
Area rank 100th of 566 in state
5th of 21 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 141 ft (43 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 8,165
 • Estimate (2013[10]) 8,222
 • Rank 283rd of 566 in state
12th of 21 in county[11]
 • Density 313.1/sq mi (120.9/km2)
 • Density rank 476th of 566 in state
20th of 21 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07921[12][13]
07931 - Far Hills
07934 - Gladstone
07979 - Pottersville
Area code(s) 908[14]
FIPS code 3403504450[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882176[17][2]
Website www.bedminster.us

Bedminster is a township in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 8,165,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 137 (-1.7%) from the 8,302 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,216 (+17.2%) from the 7,086 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Bedminster was settled in 1710 by Dutch, Germans, and Scots-Irish immigrants. It was named after Bedminster, then in Somerset, England and now a suburb of Bristol.[19] Bedminster Township was created by Royal charter on April 4, 1749, from portions of the Northern precinct. It was incorporated formally by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township were taken on March 28, 1912, to form Peapack-Gladstone.[20] The community of Pluckemin is part of the township as is part of Pottersville, which is split between Bedminster and Tewksbury Township in Hunterdon county. It is bordered on the north by Chester Township and on the northeast by Peapack-Gladstone.

Bedminster was the corporate headquarters of AT&T Corporation, prior to its merger with SBC Communications (the combined company is now known as AT&T Inc.).[21] AT&T's Global Network Operations Center, which monitors traffic worldwide on AT&T's network, is currently located in Bedminister.[22] It was also the corporate headquarters for Verizon Wireless before it was relocated to nearby Basking Ridge in 2006.

Bedminster Township is noted for having one of the most historic revolutionary war sites in the United States at what is known as the Pluckemin Continental Artillery Cantonment Site, which has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. General Henry Knox, chief of the Continental Army artillery, was the leader responsible for building what was the country's first military artillery training academy, the forerunner to United States Military Academy at West Point.[23]

Geography[edit]

Bedminster Township is located at 40°40′23″N 74°41′11″W / 40.673089°N 74.686325°W / 40.673089; -74.686325 (40.673089,-74.686325). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 26.301 square miles (68.119 km2), of which, 26.080 square miles (67.547 km2) of it was land and 0.221 square miles (0.573 km2) of it (0.84%) was water.[2][1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 1,197
1810 1,312
1820 1,393 6.2%
1830 1,453 4.3%
1840 1,589 9.4%
1850 1,826 14.9%
1860 1,996 9.3%
1870 1,881 −5.8%
1880 1,813 −3.6%
1890 1,749 −3.5%
1900 1,925 10.1%
1910 2,375 23.4%
1920 1,088 * −54.2%
1930 1,374 26.3%
1940 1,606 16.9%
1950 1,613 0.4%
1960 2,322 44.0%
1970 2,597 11.8%
1980 2,469 −4.9%
1990 7,086 187.0%
2000 8,302 17.2%
2010 8,165 −1.7%
Est. 2013 8,222 [10] 0.7%
Population sources:
1790-1920[24] 1840[25] 1850-1870[26]
1850[27] 1870[28] 1880-1890[29]
1890-1910[30] 1910-1930[31]
1930-1990[32] 2000[33][34] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[20]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,165 people, 4,100 households, and 2,021 families residing in the township. The population density was 313.1 per square mile (120.9 /km2). There were 4,349 housing units at an average density of 166.8 per square mile (64.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 86.41% (7,055) White, 2.06% (168) Black or African American, 0.02% (2) Native American, 8.68% (709) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.03% (84) from other races, and 1.79% (146) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 6.36% (519) of the population.[7]

There were 4,100 households, of which 19.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.0% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 50.7% were non-families. 44.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.97 and the average family size was 2.76.[7]

In the township, 17.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.6% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 33.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.3 years. For every 100 females there were 80.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.5 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $93,103 (with a margin of error of +/- $11,367) and the median family income was $124,057 (+/- $14,892). Males had a median income of $76,047 (+/- $23,293) versus $61,650 (+/- $7,236) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $66,422 (+/- $8,900). About 0.9% of families and 2.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.4% of those under age 18 and 2.9% of those age 65 or over.[35]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 8,302 people, 4,235 households, and 2,100 families residing in the township. The population density was 313.6 people per square mile (121.1/km²). There were 4,467 housing units at an average density of 168.7 per square mile (65.2/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 90.05% White, 1.75% African American, 0.11% Native American, 6.41% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.83% from other races, and 0.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.84% of the population.[33][34]

There were 4,235 households out of which 20.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.8% were married couples living together, 6.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 50.4% were non-families. 44.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.96 and the average family size was 2.76.[33][34]

In the township the population was spread out with 17.8% under the age of 18, 3.8% from 18 to 24, 40.3% from 25 to 44, 27.3% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 85.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.1 males.[33][34]

The median income for a household in the township was $71,550, and the median income for a family was $96,890. Males had a median income of $71,136 versus $48,589 for females. The per capita income for the township was $53,549. About 1.9% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.3% of those under age 18 and 3.8% of those age 65 or over.[33][34]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Bedminster Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[5] At an annual reorganization meeting held during the first week of January, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as mayor.[36]

As of 2013, members of the Bedminster Township Committee are Mayor Steven E. Parker (R, term as mayor ends December 31, 2013,; term on township committee ends in 2015), Carolyn Freeman (D, 2014), Lawrence F. Jacobs (R, 2015), Bernie Pane (R, 2013) and Katy Rupert (R, 2013).[37][38][39][40]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Bedminster Township is located in the 7th Congressional District[41] and is part of New Jersey's 23rd state legislative district.[8][42][43] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Bedminster Township had been in the 16th state legislative district.[44]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[45] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[46][47] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[48][49]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 23rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Michael J. Doherty (R, Washington Township, Warren County) and in the General Assembly by John DiMaio (R, Hackettstown) and Erik Peterson (R, Franklin Township, Hunterdon County).[50][51] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[52] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[53]

Somerset County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Director and Deputy Director from among its members.[54] As of 2013, Somerset County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Peter S. Palmer (R, Bernardsville, term ends December 31, 2014),[55] Freeholder Deputy Director Patrick Scaglione (R, Bridgewater Township, 2015).[56] Mark Caliguire (R, Skillman in Montgomery Township, 2015),[57] Patricia L. Walsh (R, Green Brook Township, 2013),[58] and Robert Zaborowski (R, Somerset in Franklin Township, 2014),[59][60][61] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Brett A. Radi (R, Somerville, 2017),[62] Sheriff Frank J. Provenzano (R, Raritan, 2013)[63][64] and Surrogate Frank Bruno (R, Branchburg, 2015).[65]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 6,183 registered voters in Bedminster Township, of which 1,258 (20.3% vs. 26.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 2,238 (36.2% vs. 25.7%) were registered as Republicans and 2,683 (43.4% vs. 48.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 4 voters registered to other parties.[66] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 75.7% (vs. 60.4% in Somerset County) were registered to vote, including 92.0% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.4% countywide).[66][67]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,431 votes here (51.7% vs. 46.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,203 votes (46.9% vs. 52.1%) and other candidates with 44 votes (0.9% vs. 1.1%), among the 4,702 ballots cast by the township's 6,102 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.1% (vs. 78.7% in Somerset County).[68] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,674 votes here (59.0% vs. 51.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,798 votes (39.7% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 42 votes (0.9% vs. 0.9%), among the 4,529 ballots cast by the township's 5,736 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.0% (vs. 81.7% in the whole county).[69]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,977 votes here (61.2% vs. 55.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 928 votes (28.7% vs. 34.1%), Independent Chris Daggett with 280 votes (8.7% vs. 8.7%) and other candidates with 26 votes (0.8% vs. 0.7%), among the 3,228 ballots cast by the township's 6,266 registered voters, yielding a 51.5% turnout (vs. 52.5% in the county).[70]

Education[edit]

The Bedminster Township School District serves students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2010-11 school year, Bedminster Township Public School had an enrollment of 590 students.[71]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Bernards High School, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Somerset Hills Regional School District, a K - 12 district serving students from Bernardsville, Far Hills and Peapack-Gladstone.[72]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The township had a total of 68.04 miles (109.50 km) of roadways, of which 38.67 miles (62.23 km) are maintained by the municipality, 16.01 miles (25.77 km) by Somerset County and 13.36 miles (21.50 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[73]

Bedminster is traversed by Interstate 287, which runs through the eastern section, while Interstate 78 runs mostly through the center of the township. U.S. Route 202 and U.S. Route 206 also pass through running parallel to I-287 from the Bridgewater area to Pluckemin.

Major county roads that pass through include CR 512 and CR 523.

Public transportation[edit]

The closest New Jersey Transit service offered is at the Far Hills station on the Morris & Essex Lines.[74]

Points of interest[edit]

  • Natirar - estate spanning Peapack-Gladstone, Far Hills, and Bedminster that was sold by Hassan II of Morocco to Somerset County and is now administered by the Somerset County Park Commission, with 40 acres (16 ha) of the estate's 404 acres (163 ha) located in the township.[75]
  • Historic Vanderveer-Knox House & Museum - a refurbished home used by General Henry Knox during the Revolutionary War with its earliest portions dating to the 1770s, the house was purchased by the township in 1989, and listed on the New Jersey and National Register of Historic Places in 1995.[76]
  • Trump National Golf Course - owned by Donald Trump, the course features 36 holes designed by Tom Fazio, with fees to join of $350,000.[77]
  • Pluckemin Continental Artillery Cantonment Site, also known as the Continental Artillery Military Cantonment Historic Site or Pluckemin Artillery Park, it was where General Henry Knox created America's first artillery training academy during the winter of 1778-1779, known as the "precursor to the United States Military Academy" at West Point.[23]
  • Donald Trump has proposed a 1.5 acres (0.61 ha), 500-grave cemetery to be located next to the Trump National Golf Course, with plots sold for upwards of $20,000.[78]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Bedminster Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Administrator, Bedminster Township. Accessed June 3, 2011.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 77.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Bedminster, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Bedminster township, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 9. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Bedminster township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Bedminster, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 25, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Bedminster, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 1, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  19. ^ Siegel, Alan A. (2004). "Bedminster". In Maxine N. Lurie. Encyclopedia of New Jersey. Rutgers University Press. p. 66. ISBN 0-8135-3325-2. 
  20. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 221. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  21. ^ Dalton Jr., Richard J. "SBC, spawn of AT&T, now in talks to buy it", Newsday, January 28, 2005. Accessed May 8, 2012. "AT&T's residential business, on the other hand, was once its core but has faced more competition amid lower profits as cellular service providers and cable companies edged their way into the phone business. So last year, AT&T, based in Bedminster, N.J., discontinued marketing residential long-distance service to new customers."
  22. ^ Staff. "AT&T Races to Expand the Network", The New York Times, September 3, 2009. Accessed May 8, 2012. "About an hour outside of New York City in Bedminster, N.J., AT&T's Global Network Operations Center monitors patterns of usage across AT&T's network of communications systems, including its wireless, IP and data networks."
  23. ^ a b Pluckemin Artillery Cantonment Academy & National Historic Site, Jacobus Vanderveer / Knox House & Museum. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  24. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  25. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  26. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 258, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed February 10, 2013. "Bedminster township is hilly, the soil fertile and well cultivated. It has several small settlements among which are Lamington, Peapack, Little Cross Roads, Greater Cross Roads and Pluckamin.. The number of inhabitants in 1850 were 1,826; in 1860, 1,996; and in 1870, 1,881."
  27. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 141. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  28. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  29. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  30. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  31. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  32. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  33. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Bedminster township, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  34. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Bedminster township, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  35. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Bedminster township, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  36. ^ Your Municipal Government, Bedminster Township. Accessed June 3, 2011.
  37. ^ 2013 Bedminster Township Committee, Bedminster Township. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  38. ^ WINNERS LIST; Somerset County - General Election November 6, 2012, Somerset County, New Jersey County Clerk's Office. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  39. ^ WINNERS LIST; Somerset County - General Election November 8, 2011, Somerset County, New Jersey County Clerk's Office. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  40. ^ SOMERSET COUNTY General Election November 2, 2010 - WINNERS LIST, Somerset County, New Jersey County Clerk's Office. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  41. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 54, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  44. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 54, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  45. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  46. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  47. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  48. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  49. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  50. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
  51. ^ District 23 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
  52. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  53. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  54. ^ Somerset County Government: At Your Service, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  55. ^ Peter S. Palmer, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  56. ^ Patrick Scaglione, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013. A term-end year of 2012 is listed as of date accessed.
  57. ^ Mark Caliguire, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013. A term-end year of 2012 is listed as of date accessed.
  58. ^ Patricia Walsh, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  59. ^ Robert Zaborowski, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  60. ^ Somerset County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  61. ^ Wichert, Bill. "Somerset Freeholders name Peter Palmer as director, Patrick Scaglione as deputy director ", The Star-Ledger, January 4, 2013. Accessed January 10, 2013. "Joined by family, friends and elected officials at the state and local levels, the county freeholders tapped Palmer to serve as director in 2013 and named Patrick Scaglione as deputy director. Scaglione and Freeholder Mark Caliguire, both Republicans, also were sworn in today to new three-year terms."
  62. ^ Biography: Somerset County Clerk Brett A. Radi, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  63. ^ Sheriff Frank J. Provenzano, Somerset County Sheriff's Office. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  64. ^ Sheriff, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  65. ^ Somerset County Surrogate, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  66. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Somerset, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  67. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  68. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Somerset County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  69. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Somerset County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  70. ^ 2009 Governor: Somerset County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  71. ^ Data for the Bedminster Township Public School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  72. ^ Somerset County School Districts-Sending/Receiving/Regional, Somerset County Superintendent of Schools. Accessed April 27, 2008.
  73. ^ Somerset County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  74. ^ Somerset County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 28, 2010. Accessed February 8, 2013.
  75. ^ Natirar, Somerset County, New Jersey Park Commission. Accessed May 8, 2012. "Natirar is a 404-acre property located in the scenic hills of Somerset County within the municipalities of Peapack/Gladstone, Far Hills, and Bedminster."
  76. ^ J. Vanderveer House & History, Jacobus Vanderveer House & Museum. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  77. ^ Bertoni, Steven; and Pendleton, Devon. "In Pictures: Millionaire Mega Toys", Forbes, November 6, 2009. Accessed May 8, 2012. "Trump National Bedminster sums up the billionaire himself: golf, luxury and real estate. The 36-hole, Tom Fazio-designed club costs $350,000 to join, plus $18,500 in annual dues."
  78. ^ Solomon, Nancy. "Fairway To Heaven: Trump Eyes A Golf Course Burial", National Public Radio, February 3, 2012. Accessed May 8, 2012. "You might think Donald Trump can buy anything he wants. But at least one purchase has eluded him: Trump wants to be buried on his golf course in Bedminster, N.J."
  79. ^ Staff. "Festival celebrates the De Lorean", BBC News, May 24, 2001. Accessed May 8, 2012. "De Lorean was instructed to sell off the 434-acre estate in Bedminster for $15m to a golf course developer."
  80. ^ King, Wayne. "Bill to Cut Florio's Aid To Schools Is Gaining", The New York Times, January 18, 1991. Accessed May 8, 2012. "Senator John H. Ewing of Bedminster, a Republican member of the Senate Education Committee, was more pointed, attributing rising costs in some districts to 'waste and thievery.'"
  81. ^ Hilzenrath, David S. "No Blank Checks for Forbes", The Washington Post, August 17, 1999. Accessed May 8, 2012. "To match Bush's record $37 million haul, Forbes could have no choice but to sell part of the family business, liquidate real estate in his home town of Bedminster, N.J., or go heavily into debt."
  82. ^ Sadlouskos, Linda. "Trump leads tribute to military, unfurls huge flag at golf course in Bedminster", Home News Tribune, September 21, 2008. Accessed May 8, 2012. "John Honeyman, a township resident who was a spy for Gen. George Washington, is buried 'around the corner' at the Lamington Church, the mayor said."
  83. ^ Sandomir, Richard. "The Jets Fill One Opening: New Owner at $635 Million", The New York Times, January 12, 2000. Accessed September 30, 2007. "Johnson, who is 52 years old, has homes in Manhattan and Bedminster, N.J."
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