Belton, Texas

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Belton, Texas
City
Downtown Belton near Bell County Courthouse
Downtown Belton near Bell County Courthouse
Nickname(s): Beltown
Location of Belton, Texas
Location of Belton, Texas
Bell Belton.svg
Coordinates: 31°3′32″N 97°27′48″W / 31.05889°N 97.46333°W / 31.05889; -97.46333Coordinates: 31°3′32″N 97°27′48″W / 31.05889°N 97.46333°W / 31.05889; -97.46333
Country United States
State Texas
County Bell
Area
 • Total 20.0 sq mi (51.7 km2)
 • Land 18.9 sq mi (49.0 km2)
 • Water 1.0 sq mi (2.6 km2)
Elevation 509 ft (155 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 18,216
 • Density 962/sq mi (371.6/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 76513
Area code(s) 254
FIPS code 48-07492[1]
GNIS feature ID 1351858[2]
Website www.beltontexas.gov
Bell County Courthouse
Workforce Solutions of Central Texas office in Belton
University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, once known as the "Female Baylor", is located in Belton.
Map of the city in 1881

Belton is a city in Bell County, Texas, United States. It is the county seat of Bell County.[3] as of the 2010 census it had a population of 18,216.[4]

Belton is part of the Killeen – Temple – Fort Hood metropolitan area.

Geography[edit]

Belton is located near the center of Bell County at 31°3′32″N 97°27′48″W / 31.05889°N 97.46333°W / 31.05889; -97.46333 (31.058904, -97.463382).[5] It is bordered to the northeast by the Leon River, across which is the city of Temple. Nolan Creek, a tributary of the Leon, runs through the center of Belton. The city limits extend south along Interstate 35 across the Lampasas River nearly to Salado.

By Interstate 35 it is 42 miles (68 km) north to Waco and 60 miles (97 km) south to Austin. U.S. Route 190 leads west from Belton 16 miles (26 km) to Killeen.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 20.0 square miles (51.7 km2), of which 18.9 square miles (49.0 km2) is land and 1.0 square mile (2.6 km2), or 5.08%, is water.[4]

History[edit]

Belton was platted in 1850 with the name of Nolandville. It was given its current name in 1851, named after Texas' governor, Peter Hansborough Bell. As the county seat of the like-named Bell County, the town seemed destined for growth. The 1880s marked the town's brightest age, with the building of the courthouse, Baylor Female College buildings, and a "railroad war" in which, by 1881, Belton was bypassed by the railroad which built Temple as the local junction and depot town. In 1913 the city experienced a major flood,[6] leading to the naming of Yettie Polk Park, from one of those who died. The town began to thrive again following the creation of Fort Hood in 1942.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[1] of 2010, there were 18,216 people and 5,380 households within the city, a 24.6% population growth from the 2000 census. The population density was 926.3 people per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 74.50% White, 8.10% African American, 0.90% Native American, 1.60% Asian, 0.20% Pacific Islander, 14.70% from other races, and 3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 29.10% of the population.

Out of 6,612 households in the city, 25.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them. 10.9% households were occupied by someone of 65 years and older. Multi-unit housing made up 30.20% of the households, and the homeownership rate was at 53.60%, which is 11.20% behind the state-wide average. The average household size was 2.73.

In the city, children of under 10 years old made up 14.90% of the population. Persons from 10 to 19 made up 16.70%, 20 to 29 made up 19.60%, 30 to 39 made up 11.60%, 40 to 49 made up 11.2%, 50 to 59 made up 10.80%, 60 to 69 made up 7.50%, and those 70 and older made up 7.75. The median age was 29.9 years.

The median income for a household in the city was $47,814. The per capita income for the city was $20,847. 18.7% of the city's population was below the poverty line.

Education[edit]

Belton is served by the following Belton Independent School District schools:.

  • Belton High School, serves 9th through 12th grade
  • Belton New Tech High School at Waskow, serves 9th through 11th grade (Expanding yearly)
  • Lake Belton Middle School, serves 6th through 8th grade
  • South Belton Middle School, serves 6th through 8th grade
  • Belton Middle School, serves 6th through 8th grade
  • Southwest Elementary, serves kindergarten through 5th grade
  • Leon Heights Elementary, serves kindergarten through 5th grade
  • Joe M. Pirtle Elementary, serves kindergarten through 5th grade
  • Miller Heights Elementary, serves kindergarten through 5th grade
  • Tarver Elementary, serves kindergarten through 5th grade
  • Lakewood Elementary, serves kindergarten through 5th grade
  • Tyler Elementary, serves kindergarten through 5th grade
  • Sparta Elementary, serves kindergarten through 5th grade

Belton is also home to the University of Mary Hardin–Baylor, a private university affiliated with the Baptist General Convention of Texas.[7][8] As of 2010, UMHB has an enrollment of 2,956.[9]

Sites of interest[edit]

The Bell County Museum is a Carnegie-funded structure.
Chuckwagon exhibit at Bell County Museum; the chuckwagon was invented by Texas cattleman Charles Goodnight.

The Bell County Expo Center is located in Belton and is the venue for many concerts, sporting events, and various ceremonies..

First Baptist Church of Belton
First Christian Church, next to the Bell County Courthouse

For recreation, Belton has two major lakes: Belton Lake on the Leon River, and Stillhouse Hollow Lake on the Lampasas River. There is also a water park, Summer Fun Water Park.

Belton is home to a number of historic churches including First United Methodist Church, founded in 1850, and First Baptist Church, founded in 1853.

Notable people[edit]

Culture[edit]

Belton Lake and Dam

Belton is home of the Texas Rodeo Cowboy Hall of Fame, housed in the Bell County Expo Center.

Footnotes[edit]

External links[edit]